Solved Revive CD-RW drive on ancient HP Pavilion 8756 desktop

November 29, 2016 at 07:25:27
Specs: Windows ME, not enough
I'm trying to revive my ancient Pavilion since the only problem with it is it's CD-RW stopped working. Bought it new in 2000 and rarely used the CD-RW. Then in 2013 it just stopped working. I'd insert a CD and push the tray in with it kicking the tray out a few seconds later without trying to read it. The CD reader below it stopped working too, later on.
Before all this started, the system caught a virus or something which made it cascade a constant stream of error messages. Got it straightened out by using the recovery discs. I'm wondering if that virus is still lingering inside causing the CD drives not to function? I do have a flash drive to download onto then jab into a USB port on the Pavilion. Just curious if there's a troubleshooting program for inoperative CD drives.

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✔ Best Answer
November 30, 2016 at 19:19:52
"I had the hose on the cordless vac grounded....

That won't prevent ESD not one d*mn bit. ESD would be generated by the rapid movement of air (and charged dust particles) across the surface of a electronic component. Very low levels (below anything you could feel) could cause damage to electronic components.

http://ecmweb.com/content/electrost...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A



#1
November 29, 2016 at 10:38:32
Normally one doesn't need drivers for reasonably current CD/DVD units.

When yo inspect the contents of Device manager - and look at the CD/DVD entry, is there a yellow exclamation mark there?

Long shot - is to run something like Kaspersky Rescue disk which will scan the entire system for pest etc. Many can and will hide within windows system files when booted up. and consequently escape detection/removal.

Download the ISO and burn to a usb stick:

Presuming the HP allows a usb boot - bot with that stick. Presuming it does boot ok it wi go online to update definitions. After-which it will scan the
entire system and clear what it can.

https://support.kaspersky.co.uk/vir...

https://support.kaspersky.co.uk/4131

https://support.kaspersky.co.uk/8092

and this from another site - how to use it in various ways (well explained):

http://tinyurl.com/373ojxb


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#2
November 29, 2016 at 15:09:25
Open the case & check the cabling to the CD drives. Are they both on the same IDE cable? Make sure that the HDD is on the primary IDE channel by itself & jumpered as master. Try one or the other CD drive on the 2ndary IDE cable, once again, by itself & jumpered as master.

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#3
November 29, 2016 at 16:02:44
Do you have 1 or 2 CD drive installed?

Did you EVER install any CD/DVD burning software on that computer?


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#4
November 30, 2016 at 04:38:38
I did check those in Device Manager when they first went out and saw nothing showing they had problems. Rechecked them recently and nothing had changed. I do smoke at the desk so am now wondering if some smoke residue has covered the lens inside those to prevent them from reading? Is there any way to open them up to clean things up inside? Everything inside was rather foul with a combination of dust and smoke residue but got that mess cleaned off using a vacuum and dampened Q-tips.
The IDE cable connectors to the drives and board have never been removed since new. There's an open IDE connector on a cable coming off the hard drive but it'll only reach where a third CD drive can be installed below the HD. I have a can of De-Oxit so may try cleaning their connections with that.
There's two odd things that I noticed after powering it back up after it sat for 3 years. Back in 2011 one fan went out then the other one. I cleaned them off which didn't bring them back to life. Since one was wired into a connector and the other's soldered to a board, I rigged up a small personal fan in back with a housing to pull cooling air the inside. Later on the CD readers went wonky. This Fall I cleaned up the insides before powering it up and the fans began working again.
The second oddity is the internal dial-up modem (Yep, I'm still using dial-up). I thought it crapped out in 2013 so bought a new HP tower and external dial-up modem. The modem cratered in July of this year and the HP's hard drive in September. A neighbor had given me a 2001 IBM ThinkCenter tower w/XP that had developed issues (no data transfer off CD's, couldn't open files, etc. )in 2014 so tried getting that straightened out so I could use it. Turned out it only needed a new battery and a major file dump to get the CD reader operating again and to open files. It didn't have an internal dial-up modem so I installed the one from the old HP and it worked. Then I swapped the old HP battery into the IBM and the new IBM battery into the HP. The original Sony battery in the old HP was still good so did fine in the IBM and the new battery made no difference inside the old HP.

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#5
November 30, 2016 at 05:57:55
You should never use a vacuum cleaner on a computer. There can be a static charge buildup in the hose that can zap sensitive electronics. Instead, try canned, or compressed air to blow out the innards. be sure to blow out the power supply from both ends too.

You did not reply to questions in #3 above.


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#6
November 30, 2016 at 11:55:17
It has a HP CD-Writer Plus and a HP CD reader.
I never installed any CD burning software on it either.
Before using my cordless vac w/mini-brushes to clean the insides I took the precaution to ground myself to the tower and the vacuum hose to a ground on a nearby wall outlet.

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#7
November 30, 2016 at 13:18:20
No sure if the problem is solved or not. If you removed the CMOS battery, you reset the BIOS to its defaults. You should immediately enter the BIOS to correct the date/time & the rest of the settings. As I stated in response #2, the HDD should be by itself on the primary IDE channel & jumpered as master. Pick ONE optical drive, jumper it as master, & connect it to the 2ndary IDE channel. The drives should be plugged into the end connector, not the middle connector. I won't bother going into why it's best to setup IDE drives this way, if you want to know, try searching the forums. It was a hot topic 10+ years ago, prior to SATA.

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#8
November 30, 2016 at 15:26:25
I'll search the forums about that before switching IDE's around. Right now the drives are connected to an IDE that says Master.
I did reset the time & date after installing a new battery. Just noticed that my previous vacuum job left quite a bit of crud behind so will use my air compressor to blow that out. The vacuuming got the fans running again so maybe some of remaining crud is shorting some circuits which disabled the drives?

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#9
November 30, 2016 at 15:34:42
How did you ever burn any disks without installing burning software?

I am not sure about Windows ME, but there were optical drive issues with XP that required deleting the upper and lower filters in Windows.

The issue with a vacuum cleaner is the airstream itself will build up a tatic charge on the hose. Using a grounded vacuum will not solve that issue.

Think of rubbing a balloon on your head and then sticking it to a wall or ceiling. That is the static charge.

If you didn't damage the computer you may not be so lucky the next time.

message edited by OtheHill


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#10
November 30, 2016 at 16:43:02
I guess the burning program was part of ME and got reloaded when using the recovery discs. I'm an old house painter and motorcycle mechanic who doesn't know jack about computers. I had the hose on the cordless vac grounded since I have to do that when using fiberglass pole sander with a vacuum pick-up on the end. The pole will accumulate a charge that will give you a nasty shock if your hands slip off the rubber insulation on the pole while working it.

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#11
November 30, 2016 at 19:19:52
✔ Best Answer
"I had the hose on the cordless vac grounded....

That won't prevent ESD not one d*mn bit. ESD would be generated by the rapid movement of air (and charged dust particles) across the surface of a electronic component. Very low levels (below anything you could feel) could cause damage to electronic components.

http://ecmweb.com/content/electrost...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."

message edited by T-R-A


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