Replacing OLD HDD's 50 Pin HDD's

July 26, 2012 at 17:24:38
Specs: MS DOS, IDK
My friend owns a local Medical Supply Company. The PC they use to store patient data on is going bad, and they need it replaced. The problem is that this PC is SOOO old, there is no network adapter, and the HDD's are 50 Pin Seagate ST39173N Hdd's. So I cannot even take the drive and put it into my current PC as it is SATA only. How can I copy the data off the old HDD So I can put it on the new one?

The HDD is hooked up in the Old PC via a DTP Adapter card.

I am Including photos of everything for clarity.

What I need, for clarification, is to back up the data on one ST39173N 50 Pin HDD to A NEW Seagate ST39173N HDD. Please help with a solution.


Pictures as promised:


[url=www.rethinkassociates.com/Old%20PC/bad_drive.jpg]Old Drive[/url]

[url=www.rethinkassociates.com/Old%20PC/new_drive.jpg]New Drive[/url]

[url=www.rethinkassociates.com/Old%20PC/backplate.jpg]Old PC[/url]

[url=www.rethinkassociates.com/Old%20PC/backplate2.jpg]Old PC Closeup[/url]

[url=www.rethinkassociates.com/Old%20PC/DPT_card.jpg]DPT Adapter Card[/url]


See More: Replacing OLD HDDs 50 Pin HDDs

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#1
July 26, 2012 at 17:34:18
I used to use intrlnk/intersrv. Microsoft still has it and it is called something like file transfer or such. You just need either a special serial or parallel cable.

If it has a modem then you can call up to some other place to use zmodem or kermit transfer or (I forget the terminal in xp and below).

Google is evil


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#2
July 26, 2012 at 18:41:39
Both new and old drives are SCSI (you probably already knew that). If the drive-cable has multiple connectors (most SCSI cables had 3 to 7 of them), then (assuming you can still read the old drive) you can just connect the new drive to the chain---making sure you use a different SCSI address---and copy the data over using the customers' machine. You don't mention what OS he's using, so there may be only one (or multiple) option for moving the data.

If that's not "doable" then you can still find SCSI CD-RW's available (generally used) online. Problem with that again is the OS he is using may be so old that finding burning software to support SCSI drives may also be nearly impossible.

As a last resort, you could back it up to a parallel-port device (Zip, CD-RW), but that could take quite a while if there's a large amount of data to backup.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#3
July 26, 2012 at 18:45:08
Except their PC is DOS based. It doesn't even use a mouse. Can I install the SCSI Card into my machine and then do it through Windows?

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Related Solutions

#4
July 26, 2012 at 18:49:14
"Can I install the SCSI Card into my machine and then do it through Windows?"

If you can find a SCSI card compatible with your machine, probably. But while I've mixed IDE and SCSI with success, I've never tried it with SATA and SCSI.

Again, there may be LPT port options still available...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#5
July 26, 2012 at 18:52:26
I have an old Win 98 Machine and my HTPC machine which runs 7. the SCSI card is a DPT PM2124. I dont see much on it..

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#6
July 26, 2012 at 18:57:13
You mean this?:

http://stason.org/TULARC/pc/hard-di...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#7
July 26, 2012 at 19:04:40
In looking over the drive specs:

http://computers.pricegrabber.com/h...

it appears to be 9.1GB. Given that you say their OS is MS-DOS, then the most that DOS would recognize is 8.4GB (partitioned off into (4) 2.1GB partitions). That's still potentially a tremendous amount of data to move, so I'd suggest you need to find out exactly how much data you're going to have to deal with here first. I'd also still advise to try to copy (not move) it over with the customers' machine.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#8
July 26, 2012 at 19:10:36
Lol. I feel like a chastised child. Though, that said, How do I make the SCSI card a slave? When I try and start the computer with the SCSI card installed, I get an error saying "Disk I/O error, replace the disk, and then press any key"

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#9
July 26, 2012 at 19:13:03
If the card is connected to the drive (and there should be some recognition of both the controller and the drive somewhere in the boot sequence), and you're getting that message, then the drive may already be irreparable. Just as with any interface, it's telling you that it can't find a drive to boot from...

BTW: I'm not trying to punish. It's something I've had to do many times myself and I know it can be very frustrating...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#10
July 26, 2012 at 19:25:39
Lol, all in fun. Trust me. I was joking.

During the Boot process:

Award BIOS Detects the System HDD (IDE) and then the DPT Adapter loads, and after verifying the DMI Pool Data,

Disk I/O error
replace the disk, and then press any key.

****Note... I currently have the DPT SCSI Card installed, with the Boot Drive from their old system connected. I know for a fact that drive works because I loaded it up in the old machine at their offices. However, once I try to boot it up here, with the SCSI card installed in my machine, this is what happens.

Any Ideas?


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#11
July 27, 2012 at 02:53:08
You need to determine if the BIOS is looking for a bootable IDE drive. If so, you need to somehow disable it and then the machine theoretically "should" boot from the SCSI drive.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#12
July 27, 2012 at 03:56:16
Does the SCSI Card support booting of drives ? If it does have it's own Boot Bios you can enter the Card Bios to ascertain what is connected and what ID Number has been assigned:

http://256.com/gray/docs/scsi.html

Googling is quicker than waiting for an answer....


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#13
July 27, 2012 at 08:01:23
New Challenge. I was installing it in the Win 98 machine before. So This morning I got up, Plugged the DPT 2421 SCSI Controller card into the Win XP Machine and it booted straight to windows. W00T.

Now, Windows is trying to install a driver for it... But I cannot find a Driver ANYWHERE for this thing. Any Ideas? Ultimately, My plan is to be able to boot into Windows, Go to explorer, and use Explorer copy the bad drive to the good one.


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#14
July 27, 2012 at 09:40:38
Guys I could use a hand here. I got a driver installed and all configured. But Now I boot into windows, and I still only see the C drive. How can I access the SCSI Drives in Windows???

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#15
July 27, 2012 at 13:24:12
Been easier to read up on interlink.

Google is evil


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#16
July 27, 2012 at 13:29:21
I couldn't find anything that helped looking up anything on Interlink. Tell me what I am looking for, and I can start all over with yet another process that requires me to go buy equipment I guess.

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