Solved Replaced my motherboard and now the hard drive will not boot

November 17, 2013 at 00:00:40
Specs: Windows 7
When my motherboard went bad, I used my hard drive as a second drive on another computer.
when I did this, it ran check disk on the drive. I replaced my motherboard and now my XPS 420 gets to the Launch startup repair or start normally screen. If I choose repair, it immediately goes right back to the same screen. if I choose normal, it acts like it is rebooting and comes back to the same screen.

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✔ Best Answer
November 17, 2013 at 08:33:27
This chap goes through all the issues relating to various windows (XP not the least) in terms of changing components various - the motherboard especially. This particular area/link deals with your situation perfectly…

http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/m...

If you have an OEM installation originally - it came with recovery disks and/or partition… likely you will not be able use that approach - see above link for more on this.

If you had an non branded OEM disk (i.e. you built the system yourself and purchased an OEM XP disk not tied to a given manufacturer - Dell, HP etc. - to do it…) then "possibly/possibly" you can use that to run a repair installation. But again I defer to the info. in the link above…

The principal difference. between full retail and a non-branded/badged OEM disk is that M$ would provide some support to users of the retail; OEM vendor had to supply support to the end user. Also the OEM is tied to actual motherboard, and less rigidly so to the HD… once you have activated the XP installation. Which having said… I have changed a drive or two in the past and had no problems getting the rebuilt XP re-activated - on-line and/or over the phone.

Michael Stevens "how to things various" are very detailed and specific… I find them a very useful resource.

These two links discuss it more from an "I'm in trouble and general chat approach" on - one here in days gone by and the other from another forum: but worth to read nonetheless?

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum...

http://www.city-data.com/forum/comp...

Retail and OEM full installation disks are around for very few £££/$$$ on line (eBay/Amazon etc.) and many computer fairs and clearance houses.

But again have a read of the Michael Stevens info as he is much more knowledgeable about it all than am I!

Also - to repeat.. safeguard your personal "stuff" on the HD as is; via another working system (obviously) - as advised n my earlier post here.

I would also encourage making an image of your HD as is - as MS suggests too; and keep it safe… Ensure it is a "true image" that includes any and all "hidden" partitions as well (those hidden partitions are usually used as part of a built-in recovery process - with or without additional recovery CD use).

I have Acronis; many like EaseUS products; and there are others too.



#1
November 17, 2013 at 04:32:33
Whenever you change the motherboard you have to re-install Windows on the hard drive.
The existing Windows installation won't boot if the motherboard is a different one.

You will have buy a Windows installation disc if you don't have one.

message edited by phil22


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#2
November 17, 2013 at 04:41:18
Before you go any further... Using another computer... Copy all your personal files etc. (stuff you wouldn't want to lose) to optical media or another HD) and verify they can be read accessed ok.

Then as per phil22 get yourself an xp disk. I seem to recall that a "repair installation" may work here. And if it does... then data (personal files etc. ) ought to be safe... But always wise to have those files safely copied elsewhere -first!

When i get on-line properly later today will offer a little more input - if needed...


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#3
November 17, 2013 at 06:50:59
The XPS 420 uses an obsolete BTX motherboard design. You would have been better off buying an ATX case & retail (non-Dell) ATX board then swapping all your components into the new case.

Dell XPS 420 Tech Specs

How did you determine the board was bad & not one of the other components - bad caps?

Bad caps on Dell XPS 420 motherboard

As the others have stated, now that the board has been changed, Windows will have to be reinstalled. And unless the new board is exactly the same as the old board, the Dell recovery partition and/or recovery discs will most likely be useless which means you will have to do the reinstall using a retail copy of Windows. Or you can try Linux instead.


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Related Solutions

#4
November 17, 2013 at 08:33:27
✔ Best Answer
This chap goes through all the issues relating to various windows (XP not the least) in terms of changing components various - the motherboard especially. This particular area/link deals with your situation perfectly…

http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/m...

If you have an OEM installation originally - it came with recovery disks and/or partition… likely you will not be able use that approach - see above link for more on this.

If you had an non branded OEM disk (i.e. you built the system yourself and purchased an OEM XP disk not tied to a given manufacturer - Dell, HP etc. - to do it…) then "possibly/possibly" you can use that to run a repair installation. But again I defer to the info. in the link above…

The principal difference. between full retail and a non-branded/badged OEM disk is that M$ would provide some support to users of the retail; OEM vendor had to supply support to the end user. Also the OEM is tied to actual motherboard, and less rigidly so to the HD… once you have activated the XP installation. Which having said… I have changed a drive or two in the past and had no problems getting the rebuilt XP re-activated - on-line and/or over the phone.

Michael Stevens "how to things various" are very detailed and specific… I find them a very useful resource.

These two links discuss it more from an "I'm in trouble and general chat approach" on - one here in days gone by and the other from another forum: but worth to read nonetheless?

http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/forum...

http://www.city-data.com/forum/comp...

Retail and OEM full installation disks are around for very few £££/$$$ on line (eBay/Amazon etc.) and many computer fairs and clearance houses.

But again have a read of the Michael Stevens info as he is much more knowledgeable about it all than am I!

Also - to repeat.. safeguard your personal "stuff" on the HD as is; via another working system (obviously) - as advised n my earlier post here.

I would also encourage making an image of your HD as is - as MS suggests too; and keep it safe… Ensure it is a "true image" that includes any and all "hidden" partitions as well (those hidden partitions are usually used as part of a built-in recovery process - with or without additional recovery CD use).

I have Acronis; many like EaseUS products; and there are others too.


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