Solved Replace both black printer cartridges at same time

September 19, 2018 at 03:11:18
Specs: Windows 10
The printer is an Epson XP 710 multi function inkjet. Surely I can print by just replacing 1 black cartridge. I know it would mix colours to print black once upon a time without a new cartridge but doesn't show that message any more. Perhaps it is better to buy a new printer rather than 2 new black cartridges. Ideas Please??

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✔ Best Answer
September 20, 2018 at 00:32:14
It’s not unknown, nor impossible, for both black cartridges to run out at the same time.

Rather than splash out for a new printer, perhaps consider replacing the (presumably larger?) black cartridge used only for black (mono) printing?



#1
September 19, 2018 at 04:53:29
If there is (usually) a larger black cartridge as well as the usual three smaller colours and the equivalent matching black - which is what my Canon has; i.e. a larger black cartridge for black printing only, and a set of smaller cartridges (cyan, magenta, yellow, and a matching (in size) black. then yes you ought to be able to simply replace whichever cartridges need to be replaced?

I often replace a single cartridge regardless of colour or size (if black) without needing to replace any other.

Incidentally I have found Amazon generally have competitive pricing on genuine (in my case Canon) cartridges; presumably similarly for Epson?

I don't recall Canon (or current Epson) mixing colours to produce black, at least not when there are separate black cartridges present; one for mono/black only printing and the other when printing in colour?


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#2
September 19, 2018 at 11:46:38
I have an Epson with 4 ink tanks. If the black ink tank is low the software WILL ask if you wish to mix colors to continue printing. If you push NO, then the black tank will be used for black until all ink is exhausted. What will happen is the black tet will become fainter until it is no longer visible.

IMO this is a scam by the printer manufacturers in order to sell you more ink.

I am currently using my black tank on the extended use (after low ink warning). I have printed at least 50 or 60 pages of black text with no degradation in quality yet. BTW, these are not genuine Epson tanks. When replacing tanks I get 2 warnings the indicate the tanks are NOT genuine Epson and do I wish to continue. After which the printer goes into an extended cleaning cycle before actually printing anything.

The low ink warnings are not based on ink measurements but by copy count and an estimate of what ink should have been used. To my knowledge, there are no sensors INSIDE the ink tanks so how can anyone know the remaining ink?


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#3
September 19, 2018 at 11:58:06
Magic?

Or some technology indistinguishable therefrom?

The things they can do these days...

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#4
September 19, 2018 at 13:14:05
A while back it was considered fairly common knowledge that Epson (in particular) had fixed/doctored their cartridges to indicate they needed to be replaced; when there was in fact still a lot of usable ink in the cartridge(s).

All part of Epson attempt to sell ink and rip off the end users.

This situation gave rise to a few sites which detailed ways in which to override/disable that fix; and use the cartridge until truly empty.

Also the use of all-in-one cartridges packs seems to be another scam. One colour requires to be replaced, while the others are OK. Thus one ends up throwing away good ink reserves when having to buy a full all-in-one set simply to replace a single empty cartridge. I think hp use this approach - amongst others?


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#5
September 19, 2018 at 15:14:26
You CAN use the cartridge until it is empty. Only thing I recommend is after the printer give a Low Ink message, don't send large print jobs in one batch. If the ink does run out in the middle of the run you may need to reprint some.

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#6
September 19, 2018 at 19:13:48
Thanks everybody for your comments. I think I will bite the bullet and buy a new printer. I might have confused some of you also. The printer has 2 black cartridges. One is black and the other is photo black.
It is possible both ran out of ink at the same time but I think that is unlikely. Cheers

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#7
September 19, 2018 at 19:39:24
"I think I will bite the bullet and buy a new printer."

Sadly, you'll likely find that the cost of most printers winds up being less than the OEM cartridges for it.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#8
September 20, 2018 at 00:32:14
✔ Best Answer
It’s not unknown, nor impossible, for both black cartridges to run out at the same time.

Rather than splash out for a new printer, perhaps consider replacing the (presumably larger?) black cartridge used only for black (mono) printing?


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#9
September 20, 2018 at 06:19:35
Do you use that printer primarily for photos? I ask because you have more than normal amount of color cartridges and they appear to be small volume. That probably drives the cost to print a page up.

Have you run the head cleaning cycle a few times?


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#10
September 20, 2018 at 10:02:05
Having five ink reservoirs - cyan, magenta, yellow, and black for color/photo
printing, plus a separate black reservoir for everything else, sounds like a
good, sensible way to minimize costs if you want to do both kinds of printing
with the same printer. The CMYK printheads all have to be precisely aligned
to each other, so the black-only, with a separate reservoir, must also have a
separate printhead.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#11
September 20, 2018 at 10:38:24
My Canon MP600R (kwaite elderly by current standards) has the four the cartridges for colour printing; and the larger (5th) for mono (black only) printing much as Jeff In Mineappolis describes. It is indeed a most economical way to run a printer.

For me any printer that doesn't have that configuration for inks is a "pass me by..."

message edited by trvlr


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#12
September 20, 2018 at 13:43:33
The printer in question has 6 ink tanks and they appear to be small. See the link below for specs.

https://www.cnet.com/products/epson...

edit

It appears there are 2 different printers by Epson with very similar model numbers.

The model linked above, probably isn't the model Baronia has. The link below should cover the model you have.

https://www.manualslib.com/products...

message edited by OtheHill


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