Random, abrupt shutdowns

July 14, 2011 at 00:35:03
Specs: Windows XP, 2 Ghz/1024
First off I apologize if this post is not categorized correctly as I am not exactly sure what hardware is the problem. Secondly, I just want to say that these "Tom's" sites are always my first google hit whenever I have a problem and you guys have it solved before I post, as others with similar problems posted before me. You guys have made me life easier many times. Thank you!

Unfortunately I wasn't able to find any answers on this. I am running windows XP on 2 Ghz AMD desktop. The last two days I have been experiencing abrupt shut downs. No error message, no attempt to shut down correctly, but rather like someone pulling the plug out of the powerstrip. Since this usually occurs after a couple hours or if I am running a game that is cpu/graphics card intensive, I decided to install a temperature monitors program (speedfan) and noticed two of my readings seem to be a bit hot. My "core" and my GPU were both running at around 59C-63C and had a little flame symbol next to this. I'm no technician but I am pretty sure that's a bad thing. I pulled the case off and cleaned the main fan, the GPU fan on the graphics card, and some random fan on the side, its purpose being a mystery to me. I also left the case on the left side off. Helped a bit, I am now generally between 49-57 degrees. I still crashed twice more since then. My Video card is an Nvidia GEforce 7600 GT, and a google seemed to imply that this is less than ideal for my card. Still, it also seems as if this is well below the danger threshold. I don't even know what the program means bye "Core."

A friend told me that it is likely the power supply over heating, but I figured I would ask the experts here to weigh in. Any advice is appreciated.


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#1
July 14, 2011 at 01:36:34
If u only see "Core" in speedfan it means CPU, if u have multiple cores u will see Core0 & Core1. U can use BIOS to check system and CPU temp.

A bad psu can cause system to shutdown without any error but i also suspect overheating.
Http://www.computing.net/answers/cp... response #2

The system fan will not work well until the side panel is closed.
Post the system specs.
We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let he who desires peace prepare for war - PROPHET.


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#2
July 14, 2011 at 12:41:02
Shut downs can be either hardware or software or even firmware.

Temps and voltages and bad hardware can cause it.

Bad software can cause it.

Bad firmware can cause it.

Start by at least seeing if you have any event logs or dump logs.

Boot to bios to see if you can watch any health settings such as speeds and temps and any logs it may have.

Obvious signs like stopped fan or bulk dust may be clues too.

Usually can't hurt to take a special vacumm to it. A vacuum with a paper towel end on it usually is static safe. If you want to use compressed freon (canned air) then take it outside and be careful with it.

1/3 of highway deaths are caused by drunks. The rest are by people who can't drive any better than a drunk.


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#3
July 14, 2011 at 14:11:44
Thanks for the replies! I removed the CPU and GPU heatsinks and removed all dust.

My Specs according to dxdiag:

OS: XP SP2

Manufacturer: GBT

Model: AWRDACPI

Processor: AMD Sempron processor 3400+, 2 GHZ

Memory: 1024MB RAM

I removed the cpu and gpu heatsinks and removed all dust. This seems to have helped a bit. Here is a screenshot of speedfan now:

http://i689.photobucket.com/albums/...

"GPU" and "CORE" have been at 49-50 since I cleaned it out and have had my computer on for at least an hour. Speedfan shows 49 as acceptable and 50 as dangerous.

I noticed that the thermal paste on both my gpu and cpu are completely dry and kind of.... falling off. Would this be the source of my problem?

EDIT: I also neglected to mention that when it shuts off automatically, it doesn't respond to the power button for several minutes. After being off for a while, I can turn it back on. This is the main reason I suspect overheating as it seems to need some time to "cool down."


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Related Solutions

#4
July 14, 2011 at 14:26:23
Replying via "reply to kuwese" to flag you to come back :D

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#5
July 14, 2011 at 14:31:59
I noticed that the thermal paste on both my gpu and cpu are completely dry and kind of.... falling off. Would this be the source of my problem?
Yes, the old thermal paste must be removed before applying new one.
CPU http://www.indium.com/_images/0811/...
VIDEO CARD http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SZJ...

We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let he who desires peace prepare for war - PROPHET.


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#6
July 14, 2011 at 14:44:41
Great! This looks easy enough - I didn't even know this stuff existed until last night so I must ask, can it be bought at retail locations or must I order it online? I saw in another thread you linked me to that extreme conductivity paste can damage some computers, is this worth worrying about?

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#7
July 14, 2011 at 17:07:21
Yes you can buy it. In almost all cases LESS is more. Many people put way too much on.

1/3 of highway deaths are caused by drunks. The rest are by people who can't drive any better than a drunk.


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#8
July 14, 2011 at 17:51:07
Done and done. Got ceramique from radio shack and gpu is back to normal. Problem solved? Nope. It shut off abruptly again so I went to the one thing I think it could possibly be - the PSU. it is WAY too hot.I took the case off of it and inspected for dust, debris, or anything else. Nothing looks to be wrong with it. The fan works. I wish there was something that could be done other than replacing the PSU but I doubt it.

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#9
July 15, 2011 at 12:52:18
I'd guess the power supply is going bad.

The best way is to swap with known good psu.

1/3 of highway deaths are caused by drunks. The rest are by people who can't drive any better than a drunk.


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