ram,hdd,optical drive check OK get hello beep but no boot

February 7, 2012 at 15:27:22
Specs: Windows xp, intel core dual/1GB
White box PC with ide hdd 2gb ddr ram. Have checked each part in operating PC . The cmos menu comes on and when it reads press any key to boot from cd drive nothing!

See More: ram,hdd,optical drive check OK get hello beep but no boot

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#1
February 7, 2012 at 19:03:16
Can you access bios?

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#2
February 8, 2012 at 08:41:55
Are you attempting to install an operating system? If so, you need a bootable CD/DVD in the CD drive before anything is going to happen when clicking on any key.



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#3
February 8, 2012 at 10:19:55
SATA HDD? Are you trying to install XP?

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Related Solutions

#4
February 8, 2012 at 16:23:47
I have an XP Pro image dvd in the drive. The disc works, has worked before and is working now; just not in the white box special. I have taken each and every componet and triple bench checked it. Every piece of , ram, each ide drive, each optical drive. Everything which is swapable I've run in a similar computer only the motherboard is different. Got the latest bios firmware. Now my question is, Would someone please post a step by step tutorial about flashing a motherboard. Also, do I need to reload the motherboard drivers? If so, how? Thanks everyone for your time and patience. I do understand this motherboard isn't worth the effort. Nor is the computer it is in. I just want to learn.

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#5
February 8, 2012 at 16:27:00
The Phoenix utility does allow me to access the bios. I've reset everything to default. But to no avail.

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#6
February 8, 2012 at 19:39:43
What happens that things aren't working as expected. You have provided no details.

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#7
February 8, 2012 at 21:02:57
Since you're getting the 'press any key to boot from cd' message it's finding you have a bootable cd in. Maybe it's not detecting that you're pressing 'any key'. Boot it up again and this time don't press a key. Does it act the same way as pressing a key did before? Try a different keyboard. PS/2 instead of USB or vice versa.

If that's not it, disconnect the hard drive and see if it then boots from the cd. Drop the ram to 1 gig or so.

You say you checked the optical drive in another computer. Does that mean that same disk booted ok in the drive when it was in the other computer?


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#8
February 8, 2012 at 21:32:29
Here are the details once again. Mother board is an Abit SG-80DC, which has three(unoccupied) PCI slots, an unoccupied AGP slot(removed the card to eliminate it as a problem) and connections for 6 2.0 usb ports, 2 esata ports etc. The CPU is an Intel Core Duo 3.4(standard clocking), ram is Kingston Hyperx KHK3200A/1G x 2, the single hard drive is a Seagate Barracuda(ide 80GB 7200 rpm) optical drive is a Philips(made in Germany!) DVD/CD R/RW combination.The power supply is a 450 watt Tiger Direct no-name. I had the system up and running with an AGP Card and Windows XP Professional. The system had a year nap and when I went to fire it up, well here we are!

Upon powering it up I cycled the machine several times(plugged it in but didn't power up). Then when I tried to boot the system I saw the quick self check run on the monitor, then nothing. The monitor was still receiving a signal(no blue screen) but nothing else. During the self check I tapped "Del" to get the CMOS menu(Phoenix Utility). Played with settings, then tried to boot from the optical drive; with a bootable DVD.. Swapped out everything that I could swap out but nothing would get the machine to boot. I've had a blue Windows screen asking for the recovery CD(which I have) but although the self-test recognizes both the hard drive and the optical drive it fails to start either. When swapping parts in and out the self-test "sees" the change and updates the file.

I don't think the mother board has died. I think the firmware has been corrupted

I'll be the first to admit I don't know anything about computers. Never have had any formal education in hard or software. That said, I'd really love to continue my computer education and if that means doing it through the various forums so be it.

You have all the details once again(the moderator moved my original and detailed posting) any ideas? Is the motherboard dead, is the bios file bad or is it something else? Thanks again for every one's time, patience and effort!

Remember, I have bench tested and rig tested each part which can be removed from the machine. Yes, ribbon cables too. Please don't post a test the hdd or whatever reply


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#9
February 8, 2012 at 21:55:44

Since you're getting the 'press any key to boot from cd' message it's finding you have a bootable cd in. Maybe it's not detecting that you're pressing 'any key'. Boot it up again and this time don't press a key. Does it act the same way as pressing a key did before? Try a different keyboard. PS/2 instead of USB or vice versa.

Each time I press a key a period(.) shows on the monitor. If I don't press a key, the monitor will go blank, but is still receiving a signal(no check cable or no signal message on monitor). I've tried both styles of keyboard..same result.

If that's not it, disconnect the hard drive and see if it then boots from the cd. Drop the ram to 1 gig or so.

I've got the ram to one gig. Will try disconnecting the hard drive and report back.

You say you checked the optical drive in another computer. Does that mean that same disk booted OK in the drive when it was in the other computer?

Yes, the same disk booted up installed Windows XP Pro. Did the same time with another optical drive in the test rig. Same result, booted up formatted the drive(because I was so happy something worked) and installed XP Pro again. Wonder how many copies of Windows XP Pr, that little ide 40GB drive, will hold?

Thanks for your time and patience!



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#10
February 8, 2012 at 23:17:33
What is the type of WinXP disk you are using? Is the disk a full version CD that is marked Windows XP home or professional on it?

Below is a link to the specs of that motherboard.

http://www.abit.com.tw/page/en/moth...

This is your ONLY post on this site.

That motherboard has connectors for both IDE and SATA hard drives. You indicate you are using an IDE hard drive. Are both the hard drive and the optical drive connected to the same data cable?

After you reset all the screens in the BIOS to default settings (must do for each screen), did you save when you exited by tapping F10?


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#11
February 9, 2012 at 07:22:34
"I have an XP Pro image dvd in the drive"

What exactly is on the disc? XP comes on a CD, not a DVD, so it must be a disk that you created. If it's an image from a different PC with different hardware, it probably won't work properly anyway, even if you are able to boot off it. Try using a real XP disc.


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#12
February 9, 2012 at 09:08:01
You SHOULD get normal video while booting BEFORE Windows is supposed to load from the already installed Windows installation.

Are you getting that ?

If, NO, describe what happens

(The already installed Windows installation will probably NOT load all the way- see the end of this post.)

"The system had a year nap and when I went to fire it up, well here we are! "

If your mboard is not new (usually the mboard is at least 2 years old when this happens)......

Some mboards develop this problem - electrolytic capacitors were installed on them that were not properly made, and they fail eventually - the mboard manufacturer didn't know they were improperly made at the time the mboard was made.

Open up your case and examine the mboard to see if you have bad capacitors, and/or other findable signs of mboard damage .

What to look for, mboard symptoms, example pictures:
http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Home page that site
- what the problem is caused by
- he says there are STILL bad capacitors on more recent mboards.
http://www.badcaps.net/

Pictures of blown capacitors, other components, power supplies, fried Athlon cpus, etc.:
http://www.halfdone.com/Personal/Jo...
.....

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittent, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.

80 wire data cables must have the proper end connector connected to the mboard IDE header - usually that's blue, but in any case it's the one farther from the middle connector on a 3 connector data cable.


Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.
...........

"The cmos menu comes on and when it reads press any key to boot from cd drive nothing!"

"Each time I press a key a period(.) shows on the monitor. "

You haven't mentioned trying a different keyboard.

If you haven't done that, try that.

NOTES
- you can't get into the bios Setup with a corded USB keyboard unless "Legacy USB" or "USB keyboard" or similar is set to Enabled or Auto in the bios. For newer mboards, that's usually set to Enabled or Auto by default, so if you load bios defaults, or remove te Cmos battery for a few seconds and replace it, a corded USB keyboard will get you into the bios.
OR - if your mboard has a PS/2 port for a keyboard, a PS/2 keyboard can always get into the bios - you can change that setting for a USB keyboard..

- you may NOT be able to get into the bios with ANY wireless keyboard.

- PS/2 keyboards (and mice) are NOT "hot swappable" . Plugging in or unplugging a PS/2 keyboard (or mouse) while the computer is running can DAMAGE the device's circuits or the PS/2 port's circuits. I've only seen this for one mboard so far, but sometimes the keyboard PS/2 port's circuits have been damaged on the mboard and cannot work properly. If you're using a PS/2 keyboard, try a corded USB keyboard.

- if the mboard has two PS/2 ports, make sure the keyboard is in the right port - usually it's colored purple. If it has one PS/2 port, it's wired up so that it can be used with either a keyboard or a mouse, or with both if you use a standard Y cable meant for that purpose.

- if you're usnig an adapter with the end connector on a corded USB or PS/2 keyboard, simple gender adapters, USB to PS/2 adapters with circuitry between the ends, "combo" keyboards and mice:
See Response 1
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
.............

"Everything which is swapable I've run in a similar computer only the motherboard is different. "

"Yes, the same disk booted up installed Windows XP Pro. Did the same time with another optical drive in the test rig. Same result, booted up formatted the drive(because I was so happy something worked) and installed XP Pro again."

When you install a hard drive that already has Windows 2000 or XP on it that was set up on another computer, if the difference in hardware is more than a little different, 2000 or XP often cannot deal with the change and will not boot all the way into Windows - typically you see the first bit of Windows graphics, then a black screen with a blinking cursor top left and nothing further happens.
Or - sometimes you get other symptoms, such as the operating system reboots the computer before Windows has fully loaded, in a endless loop. .

In that case, if you don't want to lose your personal data you've added, you need to run an XP Repair installation of Windows, often called a Repair install.

Details - See Response 1:
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...


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#13
February 10, 2012 at 05:24:06
Thanks again for your help. While I did post I don't don't know anything about computers I do know electronic circuitry. As an avid SWL I've done my fair share of replacing paper capacitors and other failed components. My experience started when bread board circuitry was still mainstream. You may think this odd; I can smell bad electrical components.

When I wrote everything I meant everything . Not just the major components. I replaced/swapped the ribbon cables and used a VTVM to check for power at the power cables. I've tried both type of keyboards.

With all of the aforementioned said I have/am experiencing the endless loop problem. I'm going to try another couple of repair discs.

Thanks again!


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#14
February 10, 2012 at 10:38:34
We have no idea what the expertise of a person who posts about a problem is, and what they tried and didn't try, unless they tell us, thanks for the details you initially and eventually provided about that, but even when the person has expertise and has done or checked the right things it often helps for them to be reminded about possible causes in case they missed something.

It also helps if the person comments about EVERYTHING we said, and/or answers ALL of our questions, in detail - they often don't do enough of that

You haven't said whether there has been any change regarding whether you can boot the computer from the burned Windows disk that works fine with other computers,
- or - whether it works fine with other bootable CDs or DVDs but NOT with the burned Windows disk.


Media problem ?
All optical drives are somewhat (e,g. LG), or some are very (e.g. Pioneer) , particular about which media - types and brands of disks - work with them properly, particularly burnable disks.
A disk burned in one brand's model may not be recognized properly in another brand's model.
If the latter situation applies, the Philips drive may not be 100% compatible with the brand and type of the burned Windows disk. If you copy the disk to another brand's disk that IS listed as compatible in the media list for the Philips drive on another computer, it will probably work fine.

As I side note, I HAVE had problems with a burned CD-RW disk that had a copy of the Windows CD installed on it deteriorating as time went by - it worked fine with all the computers I tried it with for about two years, then it wouldn't work fine with some of the same optical drives, same computers. I copied it's contents when it was in a drive that could read it fine to a CD-R, and had no problems with that CD-R in the same drives after that.
.........


".....I have/am experiencing the endless loop problem."

See the latter part of response 12 starting at.....

""Everything which is swapable I've run in a similar computer only the motherboard is different. ""

""Yes, the same disk booted up installed Windows XP Pro. Did the same time with another optical drive in the test rig. Same result, booted up formatted the drive(because I was so happy something worked) and installed XP Pro again.""
......

".....Would someone please post a step by step tutorial about flashing a motherboard."

You NEVER flash the bios unless you MUST !
Flashing the bios is the riskiest thing you can do with a computer ! Even if you use the right bios update version and the right flash utility version, the flash chip can physically fail while flashing, sometimes that happens the first time you flash, or something else can go wrong, you may end up with a mboard that will not boot at all, and you may not be able to fix that problem !

If the mboard EVER worked properly with the bios version it already had, then you problem IS NOT caused by the present bios version !
The bios's code DOES NOT get spontaneously corrupted !

Improper settings you have made in the bios Setup - the Cmos contents portion of the bios - CAN cause problems - if you're in doubt about that, loading bios defaults usually fixes the prioblem, although that may cause another problem when the computer has more than one hard drive installed.

There IS the remote possibilty that the bios code could be corrupted by malware, but that's extremely unlikely these days if you were using any anti-malware software at all, and in that case, it's likely there would be a lot more wrong, such as the computer would no longer boot.

Some bios versions have an anti-malware setting that prevents anything from altering the bios code if that's enabled.
If your bios has that and it's enabled, then it's not possible for malware to alter the bios code, and that setting must be disabled when you flash the bios - if it isn't disabled before flashing, the flash will fail, and that sometimes results in the computer won't boot at all after that.




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#15
February 10, 2012 at 14:28:21
r
Tubesandwires February 10, 2012 at 10:38:34 Pacific

We have no idea what the expertise of a person who posts about a problem is, and what they tried and didn't try, unless they tell us, thanks for the details you initially and eventually provided about that, but even when the person has expertise and has done or checked the right things it often helps for them to be reminded about possible causes in case they missed something.

That is understandable and I do relate to your remarks. However, my very first post was in detail.. I received an email which stated my initial posting had been moved. However, returning to this forum via the email link, posted below, is what I saw.

White box PC with ide hdd 2gb ddr ram. Have checked each part in operating PC . The cmos menu comes on and when it reads press any key to boot from cd drive nothing!

That was the introductory paragraph to a very detailed post. I went on to describe the type of part, its maker, version, part number and how I had tested that particular component(bench, bench rig or swap). Additionally, I posted the version of the Phoenix Utility, how I went through each section and saved the settings(fs10) and reported nothing had changed. Therefore, if my tone seemed a bit strained it was/is. I have have had several suggestions to try a different keyboard platform; ie.PS/2 vs, usb and received a lecture concerning their inability to be "hot swapped". As a thinking person a redundant questions seem to be a waste of every person on this forums time. HOW COULD I'VE GOT INTO THE PHOENIX UTILITY, CHANGED AND SAVED THE SETTINGS MINUS A SYSTEM COMPATIBLE KEYBOARD?

Then I received this reply.

What happens that things aren't working as expected. You have provided no details.

?What does the above first sentence mean?

It also helps if the person comments about EVERYTHING we said, and/or answers ALL of our questions, in detail - they often don't do enough of that

?Again, who are they?

You haven't said whether there has been any change regarding whether you can boot the computer from the burned Windows disk that works fine with other computers,

And again, above question had been asked and answered

"Yes, the same disk booted up installed Windows XP Pro. Did the same thing with another optical drive in the test rig. Same result, booted up formatted the drive(because I was so happy something worked) and installed XP Pro again.".


More redundantcy below.

Media problem ?
All optical drives are somewhat (e,g. LG), or some are very (e.g. Pioneer) , particular about which media - types and brands of disks - work with them properly, particularly burnable disks.
A disk burned in one brand's model may not be recognized properly in another brand's model.
If the latter situation applies, the Philips drive may not be 100% compatible with the brand and type of the burned Windows disk. If you copy the disk to another brand's disk that IS listed as compatible in the media list for the Philips drive on another computer, it will probably work fine.

Again, above question previously asked and answered

"I've tried two different optical drives and two factory repair discs."

As I side note, I HAVE had problems with a burned CD-RW disk that had a copy of the Windows CD installed on it deteriorating as time went by - it worked fine with all the computers I tried it with for about two years, then it wouldn't work fine with some of the same optical drives, same computers. I copied it's contents when it was in a drive that could read it fine to a CD-R, and had no problems with that CD-R in the same drives after that.
.........


".....I have/am experiencing the endless loop problem."

See the latter part of response 12 starting at.....

""Everything which is swapable I've run in a similar computer only the motherboard is different. ""

""Yes, the same disk booted up installed Windows XP Pro. Did the same time with another optical drive in the test rig. Same result, booted up formatted the drive(because I was so happy something worked) and installed XP Pro again.""
......

".....Would someone please post a step by step tutorial about flashing a motherboard."

You NEVER flash the bios unless you MUST !
Flashing the bios is the riskiest thing you can do with a computer ! Even if you use the right bios update version and the right flash utility version, the flash chip can physically fail while flashing, sometimes that happens the first time you flash, or something else can go wrong, you may end up with a mboard that will not boot at all, and you may not be able to fix that problem !

If the mboard EVER worked properly with the bios version it already had, then you problem IS NOT caused by the present bios version !
The bios's code DOES NOT get spontaneously corrupted !

Improper settings you have made in the bios Setup - the Cmos contents portion of the bios - CAN cause problems - if you're in doubt about that, loading bios defaults usually fixes the prioblem, although that may cause another problem when the computer has more than one hard drive installed.

There IS the remote possibilty that the bios code could be corrupted by malware, but that's extremely unlikely these days if you were using any anti-malware software at all, and in that case, it's likely there would be a lot more wrong, such as the computer would no longer boot.

Some bios versions have an anti-malware setting that prevents anything from altering the bios code if that's enabled.
If your bios has that and it's enabled, then it's not possible for malware to alter the bios code, and that setting must be disabled when you flash the bios - if it isn't disabled before flashing, the flash will fail, and that sometimes results in the computer won't boot at all after that.

OK despite the madding amount of redundant questions I've gleaned that the motherboard and firmware are not the problem. I will try a totally different approach to loading and booting the machine. The machine was built at the time when floppy drives were just going away. I'm going to try a factory floppy disc in a floppy drive and report back with success or failure. Thanks to one and all. If anyone is planning a trip to Maryland's beautiful Ocean side beaches, let me know well in advance. And I'll be sure to leave town!!

Thanks again for your time and patience. Please don't take any of the remarks I've made personally. I imagine by my style of writing some of you have concluded that I'm not the atypical J


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#16
February 10, 2012 at 15:42:22
Tried taking the hard drive out of the loop. The self-test dually noted the change, then went on to run the rest of test.

Despite others continuing to ask the same question abeit in different manners. I believe my assumption the bios was corrupt was wrong.

I know I always say " Thanks for your time and patience", but I'm not just typing those letters. I truly do appreciate everyone giving of their time and being patient with me.


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#17
February 10, 2012 at 15:50:02
The hard drive is an ancient "IDE" style. Yes, I'm trying to instal Windows XP Professional in an effort to boot the machine.

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#18
February 10, 2012 at 15:58:28
Despite your insistence that your very first post was in detail, we aren't seeing that. If you posted in the wrong forum and this thread was moved to this forum it would have been moved intact.

You last response #15 above is very hard to follow. If you wish to quote from other responses then either use quotation marks or italics.

I am the person that wrote "What happens that things aren't working as expected. You have provided no details".

That was in response to your #4 response which indicated you weren't getting the expected results but did not detail what was happening.

You should not use CDRW media for a bootable disk. In #4 above you indicate you are using a DVD. Many optical drives will not recognize it. You also indicate you are just trying restore disks at random. You need a restore disk that was designed for your particular computer.

So again I ask, what type of disk are you using? An Image of some hard drive from some other computer?



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#19
February 10, 2012 at 16:38:39
I got it running. I found the original Abit motherboard manual in pdf form. Therein is described a method of jumping pins to restore the board to the way it was when it left the factory. I followed the procedure step by step and voila! I have since reinstalled all of the original components and the upgrades, Audigy Sound Blaster and AGP graphics card. All is well in the world. I wanted to save the board in particular because of the Esata ports and its ability to run a hardware based RAID. Thanks to all for your time and effort. Time for another learning experience.

A last thought before leaving my new acquaintances. This is a forum with possibly thousands of members, associates and the like. All dedicated to the premise that computers do fail. But yet, OtheHill refuses to believe my original posting was subject to a glitch. Doesn't that negate everyone who reads, contributes and advertizes "raison d'etre"?



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#20
February 10, 2012 at 16:43:17
I provided a link to your motherboard in #10 above. If you actually did reset all the screens in the BIOS as you stated above, that accomplishes the same thing as clearing the CMOS.

Did you enter the BIOS screens after your cleared the CMOS to reset the values that needed it. The date and time for sure and possibly the boot order.


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#21
February 10, 2012 at 19:11:50
"I got it running." Etc.

That's good to hear.

I had already downloaded the manual for your model, so now that I saw the additional responses I looked at it.

It sounds like all you did was clear the Cmos.
".....restore the board to the way it was when it left the factory."
That's only the case if the bios version is the same as it was when it left the factory. If the bios version has ever been updated, it's that bios version you're clearing the Cmos contents of.
Along the lines of what OtheHill said in response 20, if you had actually loaded bios defaults AND Saved bios settings, it would have accomplished the same thing, without setting the time and date to defaults.
Removing the Cmos battery for a short time then installing it again does the same thing as clearing the Cmos - doing that sets the time and and date to defaults too

By the way, when you DO flash the bios, you should always load bios defaults in the bios Setup, Save settings, because you can't be sure that flashing the bios cleared the previous Cmos contents otherwise.

I have no idea how your mboard's bios got into the state it was in, but it's extremely likely you MUST have done something to cause that.
.....

I've been composing an answer post to your response 15 but wasn't quite finished yet.

As a last resort, I also looked up the bios updates for your model and found the Abit instructions for how to flash link, and added some additional info.
......

Here's what would probably have been response 16 if I was a much faster typist and hadn't stopped for supper:

""text"" = was in a post previous to the last one (previous to response 15).

"text" = was in the last post (response 15).

"r
Tubesandwires February 10, 2012 at 10:38:34 Pacific"

""We have no idea what the expertise of a person who posts about a problem is, and what they tried and didn't try, unless they tell us, thanks for the details you initially and eventually provided about that, but even when the person has expertise and has done or checked the right things it often helps for them to be reminded about possible causes in case they missed something.""

"That is understandable and I do relate to your remarks. However, my very first post was in detail.. I received an email which stated my initial posting had been moved. However, returning to this forum via the email link, posted below, is what I saw."

""White box PC with ide hdd 2gb ddr ram. Have checked each part in operating PC . The cmos menu comes on and when it reads press any key to boot from cd drive nothing!""

"That was the introductory paragraph to a very detailed post. I went on to describe the type of part, its maker, version, part number and how I had tested that particular component(bench, bench rig or swap). Additionally, I posted the version of the Phoenix Utility, how I went through each section and saved the settings(fs10) and reported nothing had changed. Therefore, if my tone seemed a bit strained it was/is. I have have had several suggestions to try a different keyboard platform; ie.PS/2 vs, usb and received a leture concerning their inability to be "hot swapped". As a thinking person a redundant questions seem to be a waste of every person on this forums time. HOW COULD I'VE GOT INTO THE PHOENIX
UTILITY, CHANGED AND SAVED THE SETTINGS MINUS A SYSTEM COMPATIBLE KEYBOARD?

Response 21 note - Phoenix utiliy ?
Your mboard has an Award bios version !
However, Phoenix merged with Award before this mboard was made.

"Then I received this reply."

""What happens that things aren't working as expected. You have provided no details.""

"?What does the above first sentence mean?"

Replacing "What" with "That" and "that" with "when" would made sense.
OtheHill answers a lot more than I do. We sometimes miss our typos.

""It also helps if the person comments about EVERYTHING we said, and/or answers ALL of our questions, in detail - they often don't do enough of that""

"?Again, who are they?"

The person who started the topic, of course.

""You haven't said whether there has been any change regarding whether you can boot the computer from the burned Windows disk that works fine with other computers,...""

"And again, above question had been asked and answered"

""Yes, the same disk booted up installed Windows XP Pro. Did the same thing with another optical drive in the test rig. Same result, booted up formatted the drive(because I was so happy something worked) and installed XP Pro again."."

So - your answer is the situation hasn't changed. Fine.


"More redundantcy below."


""Media problem ?
All optical drives are somewhat (e,g. LG), or some are very (e.g. Pioneer) , particular about which media - types and brands of disks - work with them properly, particularly burnable disks.
A disk burned in one brand's model may not be recognized properly in another brand's model.If the latter situation applies, the Philips drive may not be 100% compatible with the brand and type of the burned Windows disk. If you copy the disk to another brand's disk that IS listed as compatible in the media list for the Philips drive on another computer, it will probably work fine.""

"Again, above question previously asked and answered"
""I've tried two different optical drives and two factory repair discs.""

OK, I missed that ".....two factory repair discs." I'm assuming the disks were bootable on other computers, and that they didn't boot either on this computer - you didn't say that specifically.

"OK despite the madding amount of redundant questions I've gleaned that the motherboard and firmware are not the problem. I will try a totally different approach to loading and booting the machine. The machine was built at the time when floppy drives were just going away. I'm going to try a factory floppy disc in a floppy drive and report back with success or failure. Thanks to one and all. If anyone is planning a trip to Maryland's beautiful Ocean side beaches, let me know well in advance. And I'll be sure to leave town!!

Thanks again for your time and patience"
......

As time went by, fewer new computers came with a floppy drive installed, some cases didn't even have an external slot space to install one in, but almost all mboards except very recent mboards still have the floppy data header on the mboard, and if it does have that header a conventional floppy drive can be connected to it.
If it doesn't have that header , a USB floppy drive can be connected - in most cases it is recognized fine by the bios, at least for newer bioses.

I still frequently use programs on floppy disks on the computers I work on.
.....

If your only problem is the mboard cannot recognize the burned Windows disk as bootable, for whatever reason, you can probably still solve your installing or repairing Windows problem, but you still won't be able to boot from any optical disk that's bootable, unless you solve whatever is causing that problem.

Response 21 note
(If you HAD checked and done everything right, the only thing left is the mboard is damaged !)

Detecting bootability of a bootable optical disk is a function of both the optical drive and the bios - both must be working properly.

I assume you've tried loading bios defaults, SAVING them.

Don't press the key if you see the line "Press any key to boot from CD." or similar while booting

There are downloads on the Microsoft web site (you must chose the right one for your Windows version, Home or Pro, and for whether it does or does not have a Service Pack integrated into the CD), that you can make a set of 6 floppy disks for XP's Setup. They load the same initial files that the CD loads when the computer has no problem booting from the CD. If you have your Windows CD in a drive when they have finished loading, you can then continue on and run Setup from the CD, no problem.
.....

You are probably getting the rebooting loop because Windows was installed on the hard drive when the hard drive was on a different mboard.

- If you run the Repair installation of Windows procedure (see above) rather than doing a regular Setup and installing Windows from scratch, Setup will not delete any of the personal data you added after Setup was finished when the hard drive was on the other computer, on the partition Windows was installed on. It takes a little less time than a regular Setup does because it already has it's Windows settings and all the device drivers.

- If all you did was install Windows on the other computer, or that and not much more such as installing mboard and device drivers, then it wouldn't matter much if you ran Setup from scratch and deleted and remade the existing partition Windows will be installed on.

..........

Last resort.
I DO NOT recommend your flash the bios !

How to update the bios ? Click here (goes to)
http://www.abit.com.tw/page/uk/down...

Before you read it...
Go into the bios and look for a setting that does not allow / allows the bios to be altered - if does not allow it , change that to allowing it, Save bios settings.

Additional notes....

Step 2 - the newest bios version is 18 (Sg8018)
This link downloads it:
http://file.abit.com.tw/pub/downloa...

If it doesn't pop up, look for an orange tab in your bottom taskbar on the main desktop screen "0% of sg8018.zip..."

Step 4 - your bios update download is type 4b

Step 5 - Floppy disks that have developed undetected bad sectors over time are common. Check the floppy disk
- do a FULL format of it, without copying system files to it.(A FULL format checks for previously undetected bad sectors and is very good at it; a Quick format does NOT.)
- in ME and back to Win 95, a summary is displayed - there should be no bad sectors.
- in 2000 or XP, when the format has finished, RIGHT click on A drive, select Properties - there should be no bad sectors.
There should be 1,457,664 bytes capacity and 1,457,664 bytes available for a 1.44 mb floppy.

If it has any bad sectors don't risk using it.
If it doesn't have any, use Format to copy system files to it.

Step 7 - just type runme to keep it simple.
If you use the other method make sure you haven't made any typos.

Step 8 - instead of doing that you can load bios defaults in the bios - any bios defaults - Save bios settings. .
......

Manual - this link downloads it :

http://file.abit.com.tw/pub/downloa...

If it doesn't pop up, look for an orange tab in your bottom taskbar on the main desktop screen "0% of sg-80dc.zip..."

Abit Motherboard Review (of your model):
http://www.diy-computer-repair.com/...



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