Question about old vinyl records + speeds

March 7, 2011 at 03:31:21
Specs: Windows 7
Hey,
I just bought a turntable off ebay but it only plays at 33.3 and 45 RPM.
(45 rpm for the little seven-inchers with the big center holes, and 331/3 rpm for long-playing discs.)
But there are those 78.26 rpm for the old-fashioned standard shellac records. So im just wondering if these are still found much. I'm only 17 so I know barely nothing about turntables. So are these 'old fashioned shellac records' still found in vinyl shops and if so what era in music?

Cheers


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#1
March 7, 2011 at 03:52:32
Nice to see someone appreciate vinyl history.

From Wikipedia:

"After World War II, two new competing formats came on to the market and gradually replaced the standard "78": the 33⅓ rpm (often just referred to as the 33 rpm), and the 45 rpm...

Finding a good quality "78" would be rare indeed. Most of them originated around the early 1900's and were pretty much out of production by the late 1950's.

In case you're still curious:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gramop...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#2
March 7, 2011 at 03:57:23
Awesome thanks for that. So i shouldn't be put an at disadvantage with finding records and not being able to play them?

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#3
March 7, 2011 at 04:21:22
You could still likely find a good quality new or used turntable that would handle 78's. The question becomes what condition is the vinyl in, and how can you keep it in a good state, or even better, to preserve it to some type of digital media so you don't have the wear on the vinyl (plus, eventually, vinyl will stop being produced). Audio Technica manufactures a decent turntable that will output to either RCA jacks or USB (to convert to digital format, likely using Audacity or something similar):

http://eu.audio-technica.com/en/pro...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#4
March 7, 2011 at 04:51:58
Please note - the stylus used for optimum playing of each type of record is different as is the tracking pressure, Using the wrong stylus can ruin the record in one playing. A purist would have a different turntable for each speed,

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#5
March 7, 2011 at 04:55:58
Unless you enjoy music from the 20's & 30's, you won't be at a disadvantage by not having 78 speed. Personally, I never got into 45's (singles) but I still have 100's of Rock Albums (LPs) from the 60's & 70's, though I rarely listen to them anymore.

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#6
March 7, 2011 at 09:31:24
Something else to consider when playing very old 78"s. 45 & 33 rpm records use what's known as an RIAA equalization curve and all modern recievers/pre amps incorporate this equalization into the phono input. Old 78's do not use this. if you try to play an old 78 on a new receiver, it may sound a little off. You can probably use an audio editing program like Adobe Audition or Audacity (freeware) to correct the EQ.

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#7
March 7, 2011 at 13:08:33
When I was a kid there were all three speeds around. Some non-mainstream records were on 78's and some odd sized ones out there.

There were all sorts of equalization curves. American and British were the most common.

To get really wild even some records needed various sizes and shapes of needles. I think there is a single laser turntable out there that can read them all. Like $20,000 for it.

Most audiophiles feel that the vinyl record is a more true playback since it is analog. Combine it with a tube class a amp and you are in the golden age of music.

"The era of big government is over," said Clinton 1996


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#8
March 7, 2011 at 16:47:27
There was a 16X speed too.

There's money in old vinyl:

http://www.moneymusic.com/

Goodwill is a good place for old vinyl. Hey maybe you'll find a Beatles butcher album cover:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yester...

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