PS2 Keyboard not working

July 7, 2010 at 09:54:52
Specs: Windows XP
HI,
I need to reformat and reinstall XP Pro, when I boot from the CD drive, and get to the screen with the options to repair, exit or continue, my keypad which is a PS2 will not work. I have tried a different PS2 keyboard with the same results. Any ideas?

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#1
July 7, 2010 at 12:52:00
Can you use the keyboard to access bios?

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#2
July 7, 2010 at 18:28:58
Yes, the keyboard worked fine in BIOS. It worked up until I got to the screen to select enter to continue, then nothing worked on it. It just froze.

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#3
July 7, 2010 at 20:37:19
Have you tried a usb keyboard to see if the same thing happens ? Also, why did you have to reinstall Windows ?

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Related Solutions

#4
July 7, 2010 at 21:11:22
It might not be a keyboard problem. The PC may be locking up at that point due to some other reason.

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#5
July 11, 2010 at 10:34:44
I do not have a USB keyboard, I do have a USB mouse, and it will not work in BIOS. I do suspect that the keyboard is not the problem, but not sure what else to try. I need to reformat and reinstall XP because of a virus that I am not able to get rid of unless I delete all files manually, and there are just too many. The reg files have been changed.

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#6
July 11, 2010 at 11:12:50
Tell us the make and model of your brand name system, or if you have a generic desktop system, the make and model of the mboard.
The specific model of a brand name system is shown on a label on the outside of the case somewhere, or it can often be determined by going to the brand name's web site.
The model, sometimes the make, of a mboard in a generic desktop system is usually printed on the mboard's surface in I have tried a different PS2 keyboard with the same results.
obvious larger characters, often between the slots.

The model is often also displayed on a logo (graphical) screen early in the boot, but it's often not as specific as the specific model number.

For Dell computers, they have a Service Tag number - the specific model can be determined by using that on their site, or can often be determined there automatically by you downloading some software. The Service Tag number should be on a label on the outside of the case, probably on the bottom on a laptop, on the back on a desktop, and is often also shown in the bios Setup.
......

"....I do have a USB mouse, and it will not work in BIOS."

In most cases, a mouse of any type can't be used in the bios Setup, although I have seen that in bioses for some older mboards.

If the keypad works in the bios, the computer is recognizing it.

"I have tried a different PS2 keyboard with the same results."
"It worked up until I got to the screen to select enter to continue, then nothing worked on it."

Then what DAVEINCAPS said applies:

"The PC may be locking up at that point due to some other reason."

In that case, a USB keyboard probably won't work at that point either.
.......

NOTE that if you were trying to use a keyboard (or keypad) that has a USB connector on the end of it's cord, along with a simple USB to PS/2 gender adapter...

- the keyboard must be a"combo" one that was designed and wired up to be used for either a USB or PS/2 connection, otherwise the simple gender adapter cannot make it work as a PS/2 device

- if it is a "combo" keyboard....

- it came with a simple gender adapter when new
- the adapter for a "combo" mouse, often green, will often not work with a "combo" keyboard, and the adapter for a "combo" keyboard, often purple, will often not work with a ""combo" mouse
......

Try unplugging everything connected to the exterior ports on the computer that is not necessary for running Setup, and booting with the CD again.

If that doesn't help, if your computer is experiencing even a tiny amount of ram errors you may not have noticed previously , you can get all sorts of strange symptoms while running the computer from the Windows CD.

A common thing that can happen with ram, even ram that worked fine previously, is the ram has, or has developed, a poor connection in it's slot(s).
This usually happens a long time after the ram was installed, but it can happen with new ram, or after moving the computer case from one place to another, and I've had even new modules that needed to have their contacts cleaned.

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

For a laptop, or netbook, you must remove both its main battery and AC adapter before you do that.

For a brand name computer, see the Owner's or User's manual if you need to - how to remove or replace the ram is usually in that - it may already be in your installed programs. If you can't get into Windows, it may be on a disk that came with the computer, or you can go online and look at it or download it - it's in the downloads for your specific model.

For a generic desktop computer, see the mboard manual if you need to - how to remove or replace the ram is usually in that.
......


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#7
July 13, 2010 at 17:21:04
I have a Dell Dimension XPS desktop computer.

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#8
July 13, 2010 at 20:52:07
Did you try any of the things I suggested in Response 6 ?

If not, try them.
A poor connection of the ram in it's slots, alone, can cause your symptoms.

If you did try them , was there any change in symptoms?
.......

"I need to reformat and reinstall XP because of a virus that I am not able to get rid of unless I delete all files manually, and there are just too many. The reg files have been changed."

About 95% of malware these days is NOT a virus. I doubt the registry files have changed much, they're huge, but some lines may have added to or altered in it.

Describe everything that you can and can't do, and what you see that wasn't that way before.

You may have crap that was installed by you merely visiting a contaminated web site that you clicked on while searching for something that was put there by the makers of a "rogue" anti-malware program - those are common these days, and most legitimate anti-malware programs can't get rid of the symptoms properly. They symptoms make it seem like your system is severely contaminated, but the symptoms are FAKED, and no harm has actually been done. However, Malwarebytes specializes in getting rid of that crap, and it's likely it will get your system working as it was again.

For more info, see Response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...
.......

"I have a Dell Dimension XPS desktop computer."

I was already assuming you had a desktop computer.

Dell Dimension XPS what ? - there are numbers / maybe letters after that. There are many different XPS series.

The specific model of a brand name system is shown on a label on the outside of the case somewhere.

Or supply the Service tag number....

The Service Tag number should be on a label on the outside of the case, probably on the bottom on a laptop, on the back on a desktop, and is often also shown in the bios Setup.
(It doesn't necessarily say Service Tag beside it on the label, but it might in the bios.)

Does it have two optical (CD or DVD) drives?

If so, try booting with the Windows CD in the other drive, however,. many bioses will only boot from one optical drive when two or more are installed.
If you do NOT see "Press xxx key to boot from CD" or similar while booting, go into the bios Setup and find the list of optical drives, and make the drive you want to boot the CD from the first one in the list, Save bios settings.
......

Other things you could try.

Go into the bios Setup and find the current voltage readings for what is supposed to be +3.3v, +5v, and +12v - those should be within 10% of their nominal values.

Use a laser lens cleaning CD in the optical drive. If you don't have one, many places that sell CD and DVDs have them, and even some "dollar" stores have them for a buck or two.


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