Problems booting custom-built PC after cleaning it

August 30, 2013 at 12:54:43
Specs: Windows Phone OS 7.5, phenom xII, 4gb ddr2
Hello everyone,

My PC was overdue for a cleaning so I completely cleaned it last night. However, I now regret it because it won't start. Would like to mention that I've cleaned my PC numerous times before and sometimes I would forget to replug something, but it's not the case this time. Since the problem started Ive completely rebuilt the PC a couple of time to no avail.
more info on the problem. The computer is receiving power: the power supply turns on, the motherboard's lights are on, the fans and so is the video card. But no boot screen or any connection to the monitors. none of the input devices turn on: the mouse, keyboard and all that stuff are not turning on and I've noticed that the light from my sound card is also out. Interestingly enough I've also noticed that there is one particular system fan plug that just stops working 5 secs after i boot (np matter which fan i plug in. This just happens for this one, the other fans are receiving power. I really just don't know what to do anymore or what the root of the problem is, given that everything is plugged in please help. Thank you for your time


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#1
August 30, 2013 at 13:16:35
Re-seat (remove and re-insert fully) all signal connectors, also any SATA drive power and signal plugs.

Sometimes when working on a computer something gets very slightly moved causing the edge connectors to move onto an oxidized area. Clean the RAM edge connectors with a pencil eraser, then plug the stick(s) in any out a few times to clear any oxide off the sockets themselves. Same applies to any addon cards (Graphics, Audio, etc).

Were you using a vacuum cleaner? If so static might have zapped something.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#2
August 30, 2013 at 13:25:53
I clean PCs all the time, rarely do I find the need to disassemble anything. I use a compressor with the pressure set at 90 PSI, an air nozzle, & do it outside.

Anyhow, did you remove the heatsink from the CPU? If so, did you reapply thermal paste using the correct amount & either a middle dot, vertical line, or horizontal line (depending on the CPU)?

message edited by riider


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#3
August 30, 2013 at 13:31:03
No the CPU was the only thing I didn't remove. I wanted to get all the parts out to make site I got all the dust out

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#4
August 30, 2013 at 13:32:06
So you're suggesting I take an eraser and do what exactly to the connectors of the parts?

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#5
August 30, 2013 at 13:36:15
Only those parts such as RAM and addon cards which have edge connectors. You simply rub across them with a clean eraser. SATA hard disks also have edge connectors although they are more fiddly to clean. RAM is the most likely, very easily moved.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
August 30, 2013 at 15:02:08
"No the CPU was the only thing I didn't remove"

I didn't ask if you removed the CPU, I asked if you removed the heatsink from the CPU.

Does the system beep when you power it up? Have you tried disconnecting everything except the bare essentials? All you need is the board, CPU w/HSF, one stick of RAM, graphics + monitor (use onboard video if available), & keyboard. Nothing else is required. See if you can bring up the POST screen & enter the BIOS. If not, try using the clear CMOS jumper to reset the BIOS (make sure to unplug the power cord 1st) & then try again.


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#7
August 30, 2013 at 18:04:07
So I tried the eraser and resetting the bios through the jumper but it didn't work. I didnt remove the heatsink by the way. I didnt take out the ram, CPU and its cooler when I cleaned by the way.
I tried turning the system on with close to nothing but didnt change. Whatever I do it seems I get the same problem. Bios won't start, the mouse and all wont start, system fan input 1 stops after 5 seconds.

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#8
August 30, 2013 at 18:33:27
Make 100% sure that the long connector on the motherboard that comes from the PSU is firmly home.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#9
August 30, 2013 at 19:12:50
Firmly home meaning its correctedly plugged in?

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#10
August 30, 2013 at 21:16:08
So, what did you do to clean it out--compressed air, vacuum or something else?

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#11
August 30, 2013 at 21:53:41
I used compressed air to clean it out. Could it have damaged the psi or something?

Btw just wanted to thank you guys for all the advice you e been giving me


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#12
August 30, 2013 at 22:28:51
A lot of the cans of compressed air use CO2 and it comes out cold which can cause some condensation on the motherboard. It usually dries pretty quick but it's a good idea to wait a few minutes after using it before you start up the computer. Using a compressor like riider suggests is probably best. I have a little pancake air compressor I use to fill a 15 gallon tank. It works good to clean out dirty PC's and also to air up tires when they get low.

If you're sure you have everything reconnected right then something happened while you were cleaning it out. It could be either the motherboard or power supply (I assume you blew the dust out of it too).

One thing to check, if your power supply has a 110/220 voltage switch make sure it's in the correct position. Don't guess and don't move the switch unless the power cord is removed.


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#13
August 31, 2013 at 04:50:03
Did you take antistatic precautions by grounding yourself before you began?

I did experience once a power supply that died on an old computer after blowing dust out of it from both ends, it is possible that there was a poor solder joint, mostly broken off wire, or something metallic/conducting within the dust that the blowing out effected. It probably would have failed over time anyway, this was just the nudge that sent it over the top. This is a possibility for you as well.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#14
August 31, 2013 at 13:19:40
Well thank you guys for all your help, but it looks like my psu is on the verge of dying...just as I threw out my old one too. Sigh

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#15
August 31, 2013 at 13:46:28
If you haven't done so already, take out the PSU and do the paper clip test:
http://dodji.seketeli.com/downloads...

With the paperclip in situ the fan should run.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#16
August 31, 2013 at 14:48:10
"it looks like my psu is on the verge of dying"

How did you determine that? And why haven't you listed any system specs? You can start with the make/model/wattage of your PSU.


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