Solved Power switch fails to start first time

August 17, 2012 at 08:00:41
Specs: Windows XP, Pentium 3GB/4GB ram
Power switch does not start PC the first time it's pressed

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✔ Best Answer
August 17, 2012 at 11:32:12
You could also follow the wire from the switch to the Mobo. Disconnect the switch and short out the two pins by touching a screwdriver to both pins at once, then quickly remove it. If the computer starts and continues with no problems, you have a bad switch. Unplug the computer and ground yourself before you go in to disconnect the switch. Then replug the computer and try the shorting thing. If it works, just unplug it again and reconnect a new switch.


#1
August 17, 2012 at 08:21:51
Might be easier to just live with it. The switch, wiring, power supply, motherboard all could be suspect.

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#2
August 17, 2012 at 08:40:06
Thanks. The switch actually works when first pressed, but the power supply does not send enough power to the board to get things going. Pressing and holding the switch a second or third time does the trick, and everything works normally all day long. I'm replacing the power supply and hoping that will solve the problem.

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#3
August 17, 2012 at 08:48:00
The switch actually works when first pressed, but the power supply does not send enough power to the board to get things going.
You know this how?

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Related Solutions

#4
August 17, 2012 at 08:53:50
If you bought a new psu, I guess you're about to find out.

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#5
August 17, 2012 at 09:05:31
Because obviously by the second try on the switch, when held in, the power supply has built up enough power to do the job, and does it, Sharp one...

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#6
August 17, 2012 at 09:11:56
Yeah, that tells me nothing about the MB, RAM, and/or CPU. Unless you've probed the PSU and see under voltages or an issue with the power good signal at room temperatures, it's probably not the PSU.

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#7
August 17, 2012 at 09:17:45
Sure. It could be anything. But once the computer starts, it works like a charm, all day long. I'll let you guys know what happens when and if I replace the PSU...

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#8
August 17, 2012 at 10:00:01
I suggest you re-seat all the wiring and RAM. A spotty connection can cause that problem. I may well be the PSU too.

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#9
August 17, 2012 at 11:14:35
This is a fun one (not really). I replaced the PSU and the problem continues, as I had to press the switch a second time, and the PC is working normally, otherwise. The silver lining, I have a higher power PSU 450W up from 400, which goes with a better display card of 256MB ram, up from 126MB, since at first I thought it was the video card that failed when I switch on and the monitor would only show a message saying "no signal received". Since I checked all connections while replacing the PSU, that leaves RAM as the main suspect, but let's not forget the MOBO...or just the CPU..?

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#10
August 17, 2012 at 11:23:16
I'm with OtheHill. Check the connections. I'd start with RAM, because that's easy to reach and reseat.

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#11
August 17, 2012 at 11:32:12
✔ Best Answer
You could also follow the wire from the switch to the Mobo. Disconnect the switch and short out the two pins by touching a screwdriver to both pins at once, then quickly remove it. If the computer starts and continues with no problems, you have a bad switch. Unplug the computer and ground yourself before you go in to disconnect the switch. Then replug the computer and try the shorting thing. If it works, just unplug it again and reconnect a new switch.

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#12
August 17, 2012 at 11:38:32
Thanks. I read that one somewhere, and I'll try it next.

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#13
August 17, 2012 at 13:11:24
We had a server like that. Finally we got tired and replaced it. Turns out the lan (copper PCB layer) in the board from power switch to the power connector went from the new board 1 ohm to some 3K ohm. Not sure if a via broke or the backplane was damage or what but the 3K was enough to cause this issue.

We really could have lived with it but we replaced the board for a different reason. We could have put in a wire add to bypass the lan.

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#14
August 17, 2012 at 15:15:00
Interesting. I already ordered a replacement switch, as I tend to forget the old dictum that 'the best solution to a problem is often the easiest or simplest one', and go off in all directions looking for complicated problems.

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#15
August 17, 2012 at 15:29:47
Question: Did you test the switch before ordering a replacement?

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#16
August 17, 2012 at 15:29:54
The power button is just a momentarily switch, like a doorbell button. They rarely go bad. You didn't tell us anything about either power supply other than wattage. In fact, you haven't provided any system specs. Going from a 400W to 450W isn't necessarily an upgrade. It depends on the manufacturer, quality of the unit, single or multi +12v rail design, amperage specs, active or passive PFC, efficiency rating, etc, etc. Please post the make/model & specs of both PSUs, & while you're at it, include the rest of your system specs.

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