Solved Physical memory cache wont reset.

August 14, 2012 at 15:07:46
Specs: Windows 7, amd phenom II 555BE / 12gig ram
Help! My memory (RAM) seems to stick cached. I´m running Windows 7, my memory usage is 7,5Gb of my total 12Gb. I couldn´t find a way to clear my (RAM)cache. Even If I reboot computer, it wont help. And I cannot find anything odd on resource monitor. So I am sure there's something stuck on memory cache.

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#1
August 14, 2012 at 15:49:16
✔ Best Answer
7,5Gb of my total 12Gb.

Thats good. Nothing wrong with that.

I couldn´t find a way to clear my (RAM)cache.

You cant and you do not want to, Windows will take care of the Cache in its own sweet time.

Stuart


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#2
August 14, 2012 at 16:58:18
Stuart is right. Unless you are running Photoshop with massive high resolution files (or similar), you probably will never need any where near that much memory.
"If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
August 15, 2012 at 17:15:43
Guys, youre wrong. If you guy really think that 7,5gb RAM usage is normal for IDLE Windows 7, you might need to do something to your computers. This isn't normal. It wouldn't clear, even if you waited for very long. Normal idle usage is ~1,5gb ram on windows 7 with full aero. That's five times less. But however, I'll teach you guys something. If anyone else gets same issue, you can flush your cache by removing CMOS battery and unplug your powersupply for while. Thats the solution which worked for me.

So you are ready to throw away 6 gigs ram for nothing? ;)


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Related Solutions

#4
August 15, 2012 at 17:40:34
you can flush your cache by removing CMOS battery and unplug your powersupply for while

This resets the bios, so your saying the bios is using 6gb of memory all the time!


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#5
August 15, 2012 at 17:55:26
hurjuus

I dont wish to sound rude but quick frankly you are talking total rubbish. What in heavens name has the CMOS battery got to do with main memory? Absolutely nothing at all. The idea of removing the CMOS battery and unplugging the power supply to clear main memory is absolutely ridiculous.

The cache is cleared every time you turn you computer ofs. That's what happens with RAM, it loses it contents when power is removed. The only memory that retains it contents when power is removed is the CMOS memory and there is only 128 bytes of that. That is what the CMOS battery is for.

Windows fills main memory again when the computer reboots and how much free memory you have is dependant on what else is loaded at boot time and what the computer has been doing while it has been running. There is no such thing as normal idle RAM usage. Windows will attempt to use as much memory as it can get its hands on and unused memory is wasted. The memory in the cache is released and re-used as required by Windows Memory Management. Trying to pre-empt it will just slow your computer down. You need to learn how Windows Memory Management works.

Stuart


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#6
August 15, 2012 at 18:02:05
This resets the bios, so your saying the bios is using 6gb of memory all the time!

It doesn't even reset the BIOS because the BIOS is Read Only Memory and doesn't need power to retain its contents.

It is the CMOS memory that is reset. The CMOS memory stores information that is used by the BIOS a boot up. The BIOS can actually use quite a lot of memory, but like I said earlier, that is cleared when the computer shuts down.

Stuart


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#7
August 15, 2012 at 18:41:18
I agree of-course that RAM itself is volatile. However there are large capacitors around (inc PSU) which can maintain voltages on the motherboard.

I had a situation on my now rarely used W98 computer. The Wifi worked fine in Windows until I booted to a Linux Live CD and went online with it. When I went back to Windows the Wifi failed. It could be revived by reloading the Wireless Adapter software.

Someone here suggested that I unplugged the mains from the tower, then held the power on/off button in for about 20 secs after using the Linux CD. When I did so I noticed a quick flash from the light on the tower (which also happens on other PC's).
I powered up again and my Windows Wifi worked immediately. This is still quite repeatable.

Whether it was RAM or some other chip I really don't know but I can assure you that "something" gets stored "somewhere" when you power off, and for a long time too.
I was using a Belkin USB Wifi stick so I suppose that could have been storing the settinga - dunno.

Since that experience I suggested that "discharge trick" on a couple of threads where I thought it had possibilities - it worked on one of them.

More recently when my Win 7 netbook wouldn't start at all I did the same thing to revive it (taking the main battery out too before pushing the power off/on button).

I know this sounds like "magic". I had little faith when it was initially suggested but I'm not making it up.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
August 15, 2012 at 19:09:20
Interesting. I maby found something related to this issue. Now theres some software which uses ram to make a virtual hdd, which is way faster than normal hdd's. So you are practically able to store data on ram. And I think thats what happened to my physical memory. [Maby some random surge caused this?]

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#9
August 15, 2012 at 19:24:33
Yes, stuart. I know cmos has nothing to do with ram, and I dont have a clue how my method "solved" this problem. I never said it actually had nothing to do with it. I just told you the solution which helped me with it.

And I am still saying that shutting down the computer didn't help at all. And for addition, bios can't reserve 6gigs of memory, fyi.

Nipticking isn't approtiate, stuart. I am quoting "There is no such thing as normal idle RAM usage." Yeah fine, AVERAGE. And theres no way that background apps\processes uses such amount of ram, and as it is I also closed all unnecessary processes.


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#10
August 15, 2012 at 19:42:40
I agree of-course that RAM itself is volatile. However there are large capacitors around (inc PSU) which can maintain voltages on the motherboard.

But no where enough to maintain RAM.

When a computer is switched of there is still power going to the motherboard; it is needed to switch it back on again. But it is only to power the North Bridge and and the network card to enable Wake on LAN. That is why you should always unplug the power cable before messing around inside the case. There is still power there even though the computer is switched off.

Taking the battery out and unplugging the mains is a common trick with a laptop because of the power that is going to the motherboard even when it is powered off.

DRAM has to be constantly refreshed. That's where the D meaning Dynamic comes in. It is refreshed around once every 150 milli seconds, otherwise the values decay because the memory cells themselves are capacitors.

To do this it needs a well regulated power supply, otherwise the timings go to pot and is doesn't work. You wont get well regulated power from a decaying capacitor.

However, what all this has to do with clearing Cache memory I have no idea.

Stuart


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#11
August 15, 2012 at 19:55:48
And theres no way that background apps\processes uses such amount of ram, and as it is I also closed all unnecessary processes.

You would be surprised. When a application terminates, not all memory used by that application is cleared, especially is it uses a lot of DLLs. It is retained in memory in case it is needed again which it often is. It speeds things up instead of loading it from disk again. The time it takes to clear a page of RAM is tiny compared to the time it takes to load it from disk. Clearing the cache negates this process and WILL slow your computer down.

There is no such thing as average idle RAM usage either. There are too many variables involved to come up with a meaningful number.

As I said earlier, you need to learn how Windows Memory Management Works.

Stuart


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#12
August 15, 2012 at 22:13:25
You just dont get it.. Did not I just tell you that I rebooted computer, and as I checked the usage, it was still high. "When a application terminates, not all memory used by that application is cleared, especially is it uses a lot of DLLs." I dont have startup programs except windows's own processes.

And everything you told me I knew already, Im not surprised. Btw, I told that I have no clue why unplugging the powersupply fixed it, I just mentioned it, you called it ridiculous...

You still trying to tell me that "Thats good. Nothing wrong with that.". ?

Maby it wasn't cache but it was NOT normal ram usage.

"The time it takes to clear a page of RAM is tiny compared to the time it takes to load it from disk." ->

->" I maby found something related to this issue. Now theres some software which uses ram to make a virtual hdd, which is way faster than normal hdd's."

I am trying to find out what was the problem even though it doesn't concern me.


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#13
August 16, 2012 at 01:18:25
I can't understand why someone buys 12GB of RAM and then wants 10.5GB of that RAM to remain unused. Why not just use 2GB to start with and save yourself a bit of cash?

Windows 7 (like any other modern OS) has extremely sophisticated algorithms that will make use of as much memory as possible. One such usage is caching disk reads. If the RAM is needed for other purposes then the caches will be cleared and the memory released. But to want to see "10.5GB" free all the time is madness - it just proves that the OS isn't using the computer's resources very wisely.


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#14
August 16, 2012 at 04:54:01
I just mentioned it, you called it ridiculous...

I'll teach you guys something.

That's the ridiculous bit. To taught nobody anything From your first post you thought you knew something no one else new and if fact you knew nothing as you subsequent posts show.

Stuart


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#15
August 16, 2012 at 05:45:55
He apparently will never learn anything. He should be looking to see if he has a real problem (possibly not) by reducing programs at start up and double checking for malware with Malwarebytes and let Windows 7 manage his memory as it is supposed to do. If he has high memory usage at idle (he never mentioned at idle originally) then there is something running that he does not realize is running. As mentioned, he purchased the memory to use so he should expect that as he launches additional programs, more of the memory will be used. If he shuts down programs then the usage will go down but poorly designed anti virus programs and other background programs including automatic updates (Windows, antivirus programs, Java, Adobe, etc) will be sucking up memory and CPU usage and some of these can be tenacious.

Just because something appears to 'work' does not mean that it is the answer or that the explanation he gives through some twisted logic has any basis in fact. That would be the same as a caveman throwing a rock over a tree and assuming (when it went out of sight) that it was flying up to join 'Father Sun' in the sky and it would become a new star at night.

I add this just to be a warning for anyone else who reads this post, he apparently is happy in his own world.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#16
August 16, 2012 at 06:20:23
Re #10

However, what all this has to do with clearing Cache memory I have no idea.
Agreed, this is nothing to do with clearing Cache memory. It was just an aside to say that information can at times be retained somewhere in the hardware - no idea where.

But no where enough to maintain RAM
If there is little or no current being drawn then the voltage on charged capacitors will still remain high. This could be sufficient to retain information held in microchips. I have no evidence to suggest this was being held in RAM.

Anyhow, I'll keep my little asides to myself from now on LOL.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#17
August 16, 2012 at 10:51:07
Back on topic. I can see no reason why anyone should want to clear any cache (unless the cache is corrupted), because they are there to speed up the computer. A cache will use some RAM but you appear to have plenty.

As was said earlier, RAM is there to be used.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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