PCI-E Graphics issue with Asus P5VD2 M/board

Asus P5vd2-mx se motherboard
February 20, 2010 at 01:30:14
Specs: Windows XP SP3
I have a desktop PC with an Asus P5VD2-MX motherboard. It has on board graphics (max 256Mb) but came with a PCI-Express graphics card. The PC worked fine for two years and then started looping during boot up, sometimes reaching the Windows logo page, other times not. The problem went away when I changed to the onboard graphics. Installed a new PCI-E graphics card and it seemed ok initially, but then started re-booting during use (especially games). Reverted to onboard graphics again and machine worked fine. I moved the PCI-E graphics card to our other PC and it has worked perfectly there for 6 months now, so the graphics card is fine.

Purchased another graphics card for the machne with the Asus P5VD2-MX motherboard and found that the same problem persists with a card in the PCI-E slot, i.e. rebooting during use. Sometimes will start looping during boot up again. Always works fine using onboard grpahics. BIOS has been updated, BIOS has correct options selected, and all graphics cards tried are compatible with the MB.

I am suspecting that there is a fault with the motherboard, or particularly with the PCI-E slot, and that I should replace the MB. Does anybody have any other suggestions?


See More: PCI-E Graphics issue with Asus P5VD2 M/board

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#1
February 20, 2010 at 01:42:18
I would look at the powersupply first. If this was an OEM readybuilt system the PSU might not be up to the task.

Is it a brandname unit? What model and what are the amp ratings on each rail?

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#2
February 20, 2010 at 01:46:00
Have u try to start the system in safe mode? Did u disable onboard video? Did u un-install the onboard video driver?

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#3
February 20, 2010 at 02:18:32
Thanks for the replies guys.

In reply to Richard59:
It's a system built up by the store:
Asus TA-881 Tower Case with 300W PSU
P4 630 3.0GHz (775)
Asus P5VD2-MX MB, PCIE/D2/SATA 2 * Core 2
2 x 512 Mb DDR2 PC4200 RAM
Seagate 160 Gb HDD (7200 rpm)
Gigabyte GeForce 7300 GS 256MB PCI-Express Video Card
(Original video card was Sapphire Radeon X550 128 Mb PCI-E)

Machine ran fine for 2 years on the original video card until the problems commenced, and the same problems have persisted with two new video cards.

In reply to kuwese:
Behaviour is the same in safe mode (i.e. looping on boot up).
Onboard video disabled. The only video driver currently installed is the GeForce 7300 GS driver.


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Related Solutions

#4
February 20, 2010 at 05:25:58
A 300W PSU tells nothing about it's real capabilities.

You need to look at what the Amp ratings are on each different voltage rail, and whether it has a single +12V rail or multiple rails. Being a couple of years old it is likely to be a dual +12V rail unit and unless the load is balanced across the rails it is possible to overload one while the extra capacity of the other remains unused.

More recent opinion on PSUs is that it is better to have a single +12V rail of around 30amp capacity or better. That way the entire output of the powersupply is available to meet peak demand such as at startup or during graphic intensive games when the PCIe card is drawing maximum current.

The information you need is located on a label on the side of the powersupply.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#5
February 20, 2010 at 05:29:11
Open pc case and look for psu label for +3.3v,+5v,+12v. Look for amps. U said u have another system try to swap psu.

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#6
February 20, 2010 at 06:33:29
I suspect the power supply as well. Removing the video card & switching to the onboard video lightens the load.

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#7
February 20, 2010 at 07:51:01
Your power supply must have at least the minumum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD ! )
If that info is not in the ad for the video card, you can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. Some power supplies have two or more +12v ratings - in that case, add those ratings to determine the total +12v current capacity.

E.g. for the Radeon X550 chipset, it appears from searching on the web, it requires your system has a minimum 350 watt PS ( 300 watt is found in a few cases, but a lot less often than 350 watt).

If you're a gamer....
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittant rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.

E.g. for the Radeon X550 chipset, 350 x 1.25 = 437.5 watt minimum.

If you need to get a PS with more capacity, you can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...


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#8
February 20, 2010 at 14:39:35
Thanks for the replies:

Info from the PSU is
Max total power 300W
+12V 15A
+5V 18A
+3.5V 15A

Also states "+5 and +3.5V 130W max".

Maybe its just my ignorance but how can this PSU be no problem for 2 years with a PCI-E card in the machine, and suddenly be a problem now?


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#9
February 20, 2010 at 16:03:21
Because over time the unit loses efficiency. It was barely sufficient to meet the requirements of the PCIe card to begin with and now that it is no longer at peak efficiency it is faulting under heavy load. Replace it before you go buying any more graphic cards or you do risk real damage to to your existing card/motherboard if the PSU goes into meltdown.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#10
February 20, 2010 at 16:33:45
Thanks for the advice, I'll go hunting for a PSU. Should I look for about 400W ?

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#11
February 20, 2010 at 17:17:07
Re-read response 7

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#12
February 20, 2010 at 17:25:15
Oops, ok got it this time. Thanks.

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#13
March 1, 2010 at 19:38:05
Thanks guys. I installed a new 500W power supply and the boot up issues have gone away. Still have an occasional blank screen event, and I'm now thinking this is a separate problem. I swapped the monitor with one on another PC and the blank screen problem followed the monitor. Screen (BenQ LCD) comes back after powering it down for 5 minutes.

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#14
March 2, 2010 at 06:18:20
We're glad to hear you found a solution.

"Still have an occasional blank screen event...
...blank screen problem followed the monitor..."

See the link in Response 1:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
It's about laptop LCD display problems but many things have the same causes for external LCD displays.


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