Pc shutdown and won't power up again.

Asus P5n-d motherboard
March 15, 2011 at 11:53:59
Specs: Windows xp home sp3, Dual core
My pc was loading some scenery files for a flightsim and the power cut out and pc will now not power up. If I turn on the power switch a green led comes on on the mother board but nothing else working. Does this mean the power supply is dead?

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#1
March 15, 2011 at 13:03:16
Power failure events can produce power spikes or power surges that can damage the computer or anything connected to it.
If the power failure event was caused by a lightning strike, that can damage the computer or anything connected to it even when you have the computer and everything that connects to the computer that connects to AC power directly or indirectly, and the cable that connects you to the internet, connected to something that protects against damage from power spikes or surges.

If this is a desktop computer, if you are fortunate, only the power supply was damaged.
Try connecting a used power supply that is from another working computer you have or that a friend has to your computer if you can.The computer may then start up fine.


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#2
March 15, 2011 at 13:25:13
Alright, unplug your computer from power and press and hold the power button for a few seconds, plug back in and it should work...... If not then try

Reseatting the RAM just remove the RAM and reinstall it.

If not then im sorry your PSU is most likely damaged even though it is lighting up the LED on the MOBO it may not be providing proper voltage.


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#3
March 15, 2011 at 17:15:22
Many thanks for the advice. I was hoping to try a power supply from my old pc but that is only 250 watts, whereas the one that has gone down is rated 650 watts. Have no other way to test it so will have to get hold of another power supply.
Regards
John

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#4
March 15, 2011 at 17:18:56
Thanks for that. Tried the first thing you mentioned but no change. Will removing the ram and re-installing make any difference as it has never been moved so unlikely to be loose in it's socket?
Regards
John

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#5
March 15, 2011 at 18:48:33
If you're only using onboard video - video built into the mboard - a 250 watt PS may be enough for testing purposes.

If you're using a video card in a mboard slot......

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD ! )
If that info is not in the ad for the video card, you can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. Some power supplies have two or more +12v ratings - in that case, add those ratings to determine the total +12v current capacity.

If you're a gamer...
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittent rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.


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#6
March 16, 2011 at 00:56:33
Many thanks for all the info. I will take that in to account for a new psu.
Regards
John

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#7
March 16, 2011 at 08:06:08
Thanks for the thanks.

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