PC Crash after dust cleaning

January 30, 2012 at 10:59:45
Specs: Win XP , 3 GHz Celeron D Intel
My PC crashes Windows after I did dust cleaning. I removed the heatsink but I didnt know that I had to apply new thermal paste. So after I bought new paste Its the same problem. Windows refuses to load up and the PC just crashes. How do i fix this?

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#1
January 30, 2012 at 11:07:11
Did you use a vacuum cleaner?

Did you unplug the PC BEFORE doing anything inside?

Did you reconnect the CPU fan to the correct CPU fan header?

Did you clean off all old paste/pad and then apply according to instructions for your CPU?

Respond to all questions.

Check all wiring, card, memory, etc for secure connection by first removing the connection and then reconnecting.


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#2
January 30, 2012 at 11:18:58
I slightly used a vacuum cleaner. I unplugged the power. I used 70% alcohol spiri
and a plastic card to wipe off the old paste. I reconnected the fan header correctly.

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#3
January 30, 2012 at 11:37:56
Using a vacuum cleaner can damage sensitive electronics. Static can build up in the hose and discharge into the components.

Try the other items I questioned.

Just reread your original post. Try performing a Windows repair install.


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Related Solutions

#4
January 30, 2012 at 11:42:39
The fact is I think the whole system stops responding after about 20 secs of power boot up

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#5
January 30, 2012 at 12:16:05
OK. I reassembled and reconnected everything and it got past the Windows startup. I saw the cursor but a few seconds later it froze again. What do you think could be the source of the problem??

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#6
January 30, 2012 at 12:47:58
How did you apply the paste? The Celeron D uses the "middle dot" method. No spreading of the paste is required. Just a tiny dab in the center of the CPU, then install the heatsink. Something like this:

http://www.indium.com/_images/0811/...


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#7
January 30, 2012 at 12:54:35
By now I think it isnt the CPU problem. More likely its the motherboard or one of its components. Im bringing it into repairs probably tommorow and see if they can fix it.

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#8
January 30, 2012 at 12:58:50
Boot to bios and see if there are health readings to get a clue as to how hot the cpu is getting. It only takes a few seconds to burn up a cpu without the proper cooling. At one time the chip was under the top but has now been moved to the top of the processor package. It has to be in very good contact at all times when powered..

Vacuums are the correct way to remove dust in most major companies. It is unsafe to blow the dust out. It will just end up back in the system, your eyes or lungs. The problem with a common vacuum is the static could build up. A simple cardboard extension would have protected it. You have to be careful that jumpers don't get removed no matter how you remove dust. Normally a special vacuum is used.

If you must use canned air (which is freon and still a cfc) then do it outside and use face shield and mask.

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#9
January 30, 2012 at 13:53:48
"By now I think it isnt the CPU problem"

If the thermal paste & heatsink weren't installed properly, that IS the problem.


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#10
January 30, 2012 at 14:12:52
I agree with the heat sink most likely being the issue.

jefro, vacuuming is OK if you have a special anti-static vacuum. Household vacuums are not in that category. Blowing is much safer for the components.

Freon is not used as a propellant in any aerosol for years. It is against federal laws to do so.

See the link below.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeroso...


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#11
January 30, 2012 at 17:34:55
A very common name brand dusting can claims they don't have freon. The single claimed component inside the can is Ethane, 1,1-difluoro-

That happens to be actually a refrigerant http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1,1-Di...


To say that any chemical that only has a shorter atmospheric lifetime (1.4 years) as being safe is madness.

It would be best to use a special vacuum but one could have adapted a home vacuum for proper use.

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#12
January 30, 2012 at 17:42:38
At any rate, I use a 60 gallon commercial air compressor to blow out computers. Have been doing it for 20 years with no damage.

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#13
January 31, 2012 at 11:00:02
I tried putting on the paste as a dot. Same problem.

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#14
January 31, 2012 at 13:25:20
Cause you burned out the cpu would be my guess.

An ESD course I took didn't approve using high pressure low volume air. It tended to be too much of a risk for static. They suggested a low pressure high volume more like a shop vac sort of deal. Still the dust gets everywhere. Not safe but a lot of people do it. California even banned it but all major companies have banned blowing out of computers unless it is ins a special cabinet that has a hepa vacuum attached.

The good old days of floating that boards in a vat of open freon are gone. Darn OSHA and EPA;

A Pit Bull is like a gun you can pet. And there is no safety on it.


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#15
February 3, 2012 at 02:57:01
I thought Intel processors would stop working after reaching a certain temperature. Is there any solution to fix this?

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#16
February 3, 2012 at 06:12:10
The following is from #5 above. "OK. I reassembled and reconnected everything and it got past the Windows startup. I saw the cursor but a few seconds later it froze again".

If you got that far then the processor is obviously still functioning. First thing I would suggest is to boot into the BIOS (setup) and monitor the temperatures to see if the processor is running at design temperatures and the 3.3, 5.,12 voltages are all within +-5% of those numbers.

Post back with the results.


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#17
February 3, 2012 at 09:08:12
Well I got into the BIOS and heres the info i wrote down after it froze.

CPU Voltage regulator DEFAULT
DDR Voltage regulator 2.65 V
CPU Clock 133 MHz
Auto detect PCI Clk ENABLED

CPU Vcore 1.29 V
+3.3 V 3.24 V
+5.0 V 5.13 V
+2.5 V DIMM 2.59 V
VDD 1.63 V
Voltage Battery 3.23
CPU Temp 88 oC (It was rising and now im guessing its not getting properly cooled)
CPU Fan speed 2556 RPM

I dont know what could be wrong with the heatsink...


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#18
February 3, 2012 at 09:15:58
Did you clean the CPU and heatsink before applying more thermal compound?

Are you absolutely sure that all the clips holding the heatsink in place are fully seated? It's easy to get this wrong.

As you say, the figures show you that the processor isn't being cooled properly.


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#19
February 3, 2012 at 09:22:37
I dont know what im doing wrong with this. I followed all the reapplying thermal paste instructions...
Im using the TITAN NANO GREASE. Should i try reapplying again? Ive already done it twice.

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#20
February 3, 2012 at 10:20:23
Well I cleaned up some more dust and reapplied the paste again and problem solved. The CPU stays at about 50 celsius so now it wont freeze. Thanks for the help everyone :)

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#21
February 3, 2012 at 12:29:25
You did not post the +12V voltage, which may be the most important.

50c is still to high a temperature when you are idling in the BIOS. Is your heat sink a retail cooler that came with the Processor?

Clean the processor and the mating heat sink surfaces with a solvent like lacquer thinner.

See the link below to learn the proper method of applying thermal paste. Click on Celeron D and follow the prompts.

http://www.arcticsilver.com/intel_a...


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