PC case was electrically charged, attempted fix, now no powr

June 29, 2012 at 12:01:54
Specs: Windows 7, t5-3550/8gb dual channel corsair
Upon discovering the case was charged (constant flow like touching an outlet), I immediately turned it off and attempted to fix it. Unhooked everything on the exterior, depressed the power button to drain off any lingering electricity then opened her up. Nothing noticeable. moved around the wires made sure nothing was touching, slapped her back together then attemepted to power on. Nothing. The power button light remains lit when the psu switch is 'on' but the button does nothing. Thought it was the PSU so I Took MOBO(TZ77B) out and did an exterior boot with only the gpu+RAM. Turned right on. Haven't tried connecting the HDD or a monitor but i assume its functional. The case im using is a corsair carbide 300r with what appear to be built in stand-offs it came with 2 brass ones that i assumed were for the 2 holes that were too low to use only screws in. 1 of the brass ones does not have a screw hole on top(if that matters) the rest screw directly into the case. Any advice? Should I go buy brass standoffs or washers? or could it possibly be my 550watt PSU does not have enough power?

See More: PC case was electrically charged, attempted fix, now no powr

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#1
June 29, 2012 at 12:04:27
What do you mean electrically charged?

I am a hardware guy not a software guy but i try to help.


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#2
June 29, 2012 at 12:07:00
heres my complete specs, built this pc about 2 weeks ago:

BioStar Tz77B mobo
RoseWill 550Watt psu
GTX570 DualFan GPU
Corsair XMS3 8gb ram
t-3550 cpu


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#3
June 29, 2012 at 12:09:00
it felt as if i had touched a plug outlet, just a constant shock, not static electricity.

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Related Solutions

#4
June 29, 2012 at 12:17:27
The power supply might be grounding or the live contact of the outlet is touching the case, have you tried using a different power cable?

I am a hardware guy not a software guy but i try to help.


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#5
June 29, 2012 at 12:37:13
I have not! i did try using the cable in a different PC with no problems though. my mobo is currently unseated along with the psu. I'm worried that all that flowing electricity might have/will fry my mother board or CPU, though it was working fine before i shut it down, im still hesitant to put it all back in and try. Would that, or could that even happen?

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#6
June 29, 2012 at 12:39:35
I wouldn't put it back in the case until i know whats causing it to happen.

Have you got a multimeter?

I am a hardware guy not a software guy but i try to help.


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#7
June 29, 2012 at 12:59:09
When you switch the computer on with the power supply outside the case, does the power supply give a charge?
Try testing it with a multimeter.


I am a hardware guy not a software guy but i try to help.


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#8
June 29, 2012 at 13:14:17
DO NOT POWER THIS ON. TAKE IT TO A PROFESSIONAL BEFORE YOU KILL YOURSELF OR SOME INNOCENT BYSTANDER. Or have a licensed electrician check your home.

There is some immediate danger here that you do not understand.

You never test this with a touch test,. NEVER EVER. Always use proper safety equipment. Use a meter to decide. Use of rubber gloves and other safety mats may even be in order.

If you ever "feel" electricity at all then never try to touch it again. Don't use it unless you have to proper training and tools to test and repair it. Your life depends on it. Household electrical deaths happen by the hundreds each year.

Hang up and live.


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#9
June 29, 2012 at 13:21:00
Send it back from where you bought it from, say its a death hazard.

I am a hardware guy not a software guy but i try to help.


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#10
June 29, 2012 at 13:36:25
To back up what jefro said, have an electrician check the outlet that you are plugged into, sounds like you could have a HOT grounded outlet, this will some times come about when someone has hooked a ground lead into what is called the "grounded conductor" or neutral some where in the house.
Dont fool around with this, BTW where are you located?

Keep the old stuff running


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#11
June 29, 2012 at 16:06:57
If this was pumping 110/220V through the case you would have felt a lot more than a tingle from it. It would have thrown you across the room. I suspect the case with it's built-in pressed "standoffs" is grounding on an inappropriate place on the motherboard causing either a 5V or 12V leakage. Return that case and get a better one with relocatable standoffs, then make sure that standoffs are only placed beneath the appropriately insulated screwholes in the motherboard.

Goin' Fishin' (Some day)


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#12
June 29, 2012 at 16:33:09
It wouldn't 'throw you across the room', i've been shocked a few times with 240v, i,ve always stayed in the same place though i don't recommend you touching 120v/220v/240v at 50Hz/60Hz.

5v/12v hasn't got enough potential to even tingle you unless you put 5v on you tongue, you tongue has more water on it so less resistant to electric.

I am a hardware guy not a software guy but i try to help.


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#13
June 29, 2012 at 16:52:28
It does sound like 110 Volts AC from the description.
Definitely test the outlet, preferably by a professional, at the minimum by purchasing one of the plug in testers that had coded lights that will tell you if it is normal or one of the many faults that are possible.
Only after the outlet tests OK then you should plug only the power supply in (when on a non-conductive surface) and put one of the meter's leads to the ground screw on an outlet and the other to the metal of the power supply (try a few spots). If there is power there, you will get a reading, if you get ANY reading except zero, return it for a refund or exchange it for a better one.
If the power supply tests OK there, remount it in the empty case and test it again. I do agree that you probably should exchange the case for one that allows you to use only the stand offs that are required for your board though.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#14
June 29, 2012 at 18:28:24
Each person has different resistance to current and they also have different sensation to electricity. To say it is or is not a lethal voltage by some "feel" is deadly foolish.

Do not ever think a test by touch is safe. It could easily kill you.

Current kills you. It takes as low as 60 milliamps to kill a person. This is not a joke people. Do not suggest to anyone that feel is OK to judge how close to death they are.

Hang up and live.


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#15
June 29, 2012 at 19:54:10
"Do not ever think a test by touch is safe. It could easily kill you.

Current kills you. It takes as low as 60 milliamps to kill a person. This is not a joke people. Do not suggest to anyone that feel is OK to judge how close to death they are."

Agreed. And if your perspiring, touching water, etc., your body's resistance drops dramatically. This allows more current to flow through your body (i.e.--even less voltage could kill).

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#16
June 29, 2012 at 23:23:50
Isn't current or amps how many electrons are flowing through the wire, and the volts the force pushing the electrons?

I am a hardware guy not a software guy but i try to help.


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#17
June 29, 2012 at 23:37:43
Maybe a live contact in the power supply isn't separated from the PSUs case by the layer of plastic material and is conducting electric.

I am a hardware guy not a software guy but i try to help.


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#18
June 29, 2012 at 23:42:41
And the power outlet gives out low voltage high current ( is converted to high voltage, over 10Kv, low current via a transformer to and from the power station).

I am a hardware guy not a software guy but i try to help.


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#19
June 30, 2012 at 06:22:48
jay_nar2012, I think that some people if not all can edit posts instead of making one after another.

In a very simple sense current is like the water size of a water hose. A 1 inch hose and a 2 inch hose. The 2 inch has more current. This is a very simplistic statement.
Voltage is like the pressure. 100 psi versus 200psi. The 200psi would be like higher voltage.

I have heard of welders that have been killed. The welding machine is like 40 volts but had enough current to kill. You do need enough voltage to usually break the skin. Like the guy above said, being moist or wet or having salt on your skin or just having a path through your heart can kill.


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#20
June 30, 2012 at 11:35:54
Almost 100% percent certain the outlet is as you say it is. and to everyone worried about me dying, thank you but fret not lol i promise i wont kill myself. Im having a friend bring over a multimeter so I will be testing everything including the psu. Also, i recently noticed the "Ground" light on my Surge protector is off If thats any indication of anything.

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#21
June 30, 2012 at 11:48:28
It is not just you that we are worried about. I am concerned that anyone who has a similar issue might be tempted to do something stupid and get killed.

I hope your friend is a skilled and trained individual who knows how to proper detect and repair this. Otherwise, pay for a real professional. Who knows what is going on here.

I have worked around high voltage for decades. I had a friend electrocuted and I was almost vaporized. Even being trained I have been poked by others doing stupid stuff. You simply have to treat electricity as a loaded gun and the hammer is falling.

Hang up and live.


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#22
June 30, 2012 at 12:10:30
Ill be testing the PSU and outlet soon, but when i power it on outside the case it works perfectly, fan turns on and does not shock anything(PSU). also i noticed that everytime ive plugged in a monitor via VGA it seems to electrify the case, on both pcs.

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#23
June 30, 2012 at 13:19:05
VGA cables are around 1-4v and and less than 100ma i think.

I am a hardware guy not a software guy but i try to help.


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#24
June 30, 2012 at 16:11:33
Then you are using some meter and using protective gear to do these tests?

I don't know what is causing this issue but you need to test everything there. It could be a faulty monitor.

Hang up and live.


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