old 386 computer

Toshiba SATELLITE
qim January 27, 2009 at 03:49:48
Specs: Windows XP, intel 1 Gb
How can I transfer old DOS data from 386 disks (no loger attached to computer) to be read in modern Windows based computer?

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#1
January 27, 2009 at 04:05:11
What do you mean 386 disks? Do you mean 5.25" floppy disks. If they are 5.25" disk then you might have problems. Read this thread and decide if it can be done.

http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

If they are 3.5" floppy disks then any PC with a 3.5" drive will read them.

If it is a hard disk then you can temporary attach the hard disk to a modern computer as a slave and read the data that way.

Having got the data onto a modern computer making use of it may be another matter altogether.

Stuart


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#2
January 27, 2009 at 04:25:55
Sorry.. I mean old hard disks

The data is in DOS format using a software called Infostar, and particularly a member of that family called Datastar.

Any clues?


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#3
January 27, 2009 at 05:01:29
Getting the data onto the modern computer is the simple part. Just attach the hard disk as a slave drive and copy the data.

However in order to read it you are going to need the software that created it in the first place. As this is a DOS application it may or may not work in a modern Windows computer. The only way to find out is to try it.

Being a DOS application the chances are the data is in a proprietary format and will need converting to a format that can be read by a modern application.

Try contacting the manufactures of the software if they still exist and see if they have a conversion facility and/or an updated version of the software.

Stuart


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Related Solutions

#4
January 27, 2009 at 05:18:44
Thanks

In fact, I am sure I still have the original programme disks, although they will be, I seem to recall, in 5 1/4 floppies, and I don't have a floppy drive any more. Are they still on sale?

I was hoping that transferring the whole 386 drive across to a partition on a modern one would get the programmes readable and workable. Doesn't worl like that, I guess?

qim


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#5
January 27, 2009 at 06:39:10
Regarding 5.25" floppies, see the link in my first post. Finding a %.25" drive will be difficult but not impossible and there are other considerations as well.

You could transfer the whole partition across and try it. You could do that with a DOS application but whether it will work in a Windows environment is another matter as Windows XP only has a DOS emulator.

If you have a copy of Windows 98 around you could try installing that and running the application under windows 98. That does have a DOS sub-system.

Stuart


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#6
January 27, 2009 at 06:47:41
Thanks Stuart, just one more to recap

Assume I get a virgin drive,can I load it with an MS-DOS operating system (I still have one, and also have a 98SE)and then transfer the old drive across to the new one?

I suppose th would be equivalent to trying the old drive as it is coupled to the new computer (with a 98SE partition)

Makes sense? No?

Thanks for everything

qim


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#7
January 27, 2009 at 07:09:57
That would be the best solution if you still have a copy of MS-DOS knocking around. It would be relatively easy to install MS-DOS on a virgin drive. It can be problamatic trying to install MS-DOS on system that already has Windows on it.

You could put both MS-DOS and Windows 98 on the virgin drive but do MS-DOS first.

Stuart


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#8
January 27, 2009 at 07:14:24
You could also install Microsoft Virtual Machine (it's free) and run DOS from within Windows.

"So won’t you give this man his wings
What a shame
To have to beg you to see
We’re not all the same
What a shame" - Shinedown


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#9
January 27, 2009 at 07:14:27
I have seen alot of similar ones at thift stores.
http://cgi.ebay.com/Packard-Bell-PB...

larry


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#10
January 27, 2009 at 07:16:19
Thank you Stuart

qim


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#11
February 1, 2009 at 00:55:40

Do yo know if I can load a portale drive with dos and use it as a normal drive? I could never understand if portable externaldrives do the same job as internal ones, or whether they are just for data storage.

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#12
February 1, 2009 at 08:43:25
You could boot from an external portable drive providing you computer has the ability to boot from a USB device. If this is so than you can. There should be setting in the BIOS that will indicate whether you can boot from a USB.

Stuart


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