Solved OCZ ZX Series 1000W PSU Blown out?

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September 6, 2011 at 11:10:25
Specs: Windows 7, Core i7 2600k/16 GB RAM
Hi all,

I've got a 1000W, gold rated OCZ PSU that I think just blew up, and it's only two months old. I hit the power button on my desktop this morning and there was a loud pop, followed by all of the electricity in the room going out. I unplugged everything and had to flip the breaker to get it back on. Now the PC won't power up at all. I've already got a new PSU coming in tomorrow, and I'm hoping that's the only part of my computer that's been damaged. My question is what could cause this to happen, and how can I prevent something like this in the future... Thanks!


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✔ Best Answer
September 8, 2011 at 08:22:16
> My question is what could cause this to happen, and how can I prevent something
> like this in the future...

Many failures are manufacturing defects. Manufacturing defects can finally cause a failure even years later. Ie those counterfeit electrolytic capacitors that failed months or years later.

Most want to blame it on something immediate. So urban myth purveyors speculate surges. If a surge did that damage, then how many other appliances also failed during that microsecond event?

Some will blame low voltages again on speculation. Incandescent bulbs can dim to less than 50% intensity. That is normal voltage for all electronics. Utility must cut power long before voltage stays that low. Because low voltage is harmful to motorized appliances - not to electronics. Either the appliance works perfectly normal. Or it powers off normally. No damage.

Infant mortality is when manufacturing defects most often cause failures. But such defects can cause failures even years later.

Little can avert a manufacturing defect. However one excellent tool to find some manufacturing defects is heat. Electronics in a 100 degree F room can fail. Later, as that defect gets worse, the same appliance fails at 70 degrees. Heat is a fabulous diagnostic tool to find defective electronics before the warranty expires. 100 degrees F is normal temperature for all consumer electronics.

Considering the number of possible reasons for failure, it is amazing that any electronic device works more than a month.



#1
September 6, 2011 at 13:23:43
Cause? There are no guarantees with Electricty man...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mydT...

MOOOOooove! OH and you're welcome!


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#2
September 6, 2011 at 13:26:07
It could be several different things... faulty psu, surge or brownout, dust or something else causing a short, etc. You can get a power supply tester pretty cheap at a computer supply shop and that will tell you for sure if it's hosed, but I'm pretty sure it is. It would probably be a good idea to put your system on a UPS from now on, or at the very least a good surge protector. A good UPS will protect from both brownouts and surges, and give you enough time to save and shutdown when the power goes out.

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#3
September 6, 2011 at 14:17:13
Too many variables to know for sure. Either or both power supply or the ac system is at fault.

Oddly, places that may have a large number of electronic devices now have a unique issue. Many electronic devices and vfd drive motors have what is called harmonics that can't easily be read by normal volt meters. These harmonics may be providing too high of voltage to your system.

Could be a big bug died in your PSU.

Could be a mouse ate a wire.

Condensation causing shorts.

Low ac voltages, high voltages. Static electricity.

The list goes on.

1/3 of highway deaths are caused by drunks. The rest are by people who can't drive any better than a drunk.


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#4
September 8, 2011 at 08:22:16
✔ Best Answer
> My question is what could cause this to happen, and how can I prevent something
> like this in the future...

Many failures are manufacturing defects. Manufacturing defects can finally cause a failure even years later. Ie those counterfeit electrolytic capacitors that failed months or years later.

Most want to blame it on something immediate. So urban myth purveyors speculate surges. If a surge did that damage, then how many other appliances also failed during that microsecond event?

Some will blame low voltages again on speculation. Incandescent bulbs can dim to less than 50% intensity. That is normal voltage for all electronics. Utility must cut power long before voltage stays that low. Because low voltage is harmful to motorized appliances - not to electronics. Either the appliance works perfectly normal. Or it powers off normally. No damage.

Infant mortality is when manufacturing defects most often cause failures. But such defects can cause failures even years later.

Little can avert a manufacturing defect. However one excellent tool to find some manufacturing defects is heat. Electronics in a 100 degree F room can fail. Later, as that defect gets worse, the same appliance fails at 70 degrees. Heat is a fabulous diagnostic tool to find defective electronics before the warranty expires. 100 degrees F is normal temperature for all consumer electronics.

Considering the number of possible reasons for failure, it is amazing that any electronic device works more than a month.


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