Nothing happens when I try to boot using a cd

Microsoft Windows xp professional w/serv...
June 22, 2010 at 07:23:47
Specs: Windows XP, 2048
Ok Now I'm having a problem when trying to install windows... for some reason when I have a cd in the dvd/cd drive after it shows the first screen telling you to press f1 for boot menu f2 for set up and f10 for system recovery

It goes to a black screen and says Set up is detecting your hardware configuration it doesn't go to the part where it says press any key to boot from the cd


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#1
June 22, 2010 at 07:34:28
Try entering using the F1 or F2 keys without the cd in the drive. Select boot from cdrom first, then select save and exit. Then insert the cd and see what happens.

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#2
June 22, 2010 at 07:49:40
I had already did that, I made the first boot to be from the cd group

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#3
June 22, 2010 at 08:22:36
"It goes to a black screen and says Set up is detecting your hardware configuration it doesn't go to the part where it says press any key to boot from the cd"

If there is no operating system detected on your hard drive by the bios, and if the mboard's bios Setup settings are already set so the computer will boot from a bootable CD, and if there is a bootable Windows CD in a drive, you don't get the line on the screen while booting "press any key to boot from the cd" or similar - the bios automatically boots from the Windows CD.

However, if the CD doesn't load the initial files needed to run Setup and when you run Setup find the hard drive normally, or if Setup partially runs but does not complete, you have some other problem.

E.g.
If the hard drive is a SATA hard drive, the XP CD has no built in support for recognizing SATA drive controllers. By default, the initial files will load from the Windows CD, then you see a screen where you can choose to run Setup. If you choose that, Setup will NOT find the SATA hard drive, unless......

- the bios Setup has the SATA drive controller in an IDE compatible mode, a.k.a ATA, EIDE, Compatibility, PATA mode, etc. In that case Setup detects the SATA drive as an IDE compatible drive and Setup finds the SATA drive fine.
E.g. Sometimes the bios has the drive controller set to a SATA mode by default - in that case, find a setting in the bios where it's set to SATA or AHCI - change that to some sort of IDE compatible mode, Save bios settings, then boot from the Windows CD.

- or - if the the bios Setup has the SATA drive controller in SATA mode, a.k.a, AHCI mode, or RAID SATA or AHCI mode, then
near the beginning of loading files from the CD, you see a line "Press F6 to load ....." - Press F6 while that line is on the screen, then later while loading the intial files from the CD, you will be prompted to provide drivers. At that point you must insert a floppy disk into a connected legacy floppy drive, the floppy disk must have the proper drivers for your SATA controller already on it. When Setup gets to the point where it looks for hard drives, it will then find all SATA hard drives.
If you don't have a legacy floppy drive connected (a regular internal floppy drive, it's data cable connected to a header on the mboard) that presents a problem, because XP's Setup will NOT look for the drivers on a CD or DVD, or on another hard drive or hard drive partition, or a USB connected flash drive or external hard drive, and it can only recognize a small number of models of USB connected floppy drives, mostly models that were available way back when XP was first released, circa 2001, that are no longer being made.
It's much easier to set the SATA controller in the bios to an IDE compatible mode, if you can (you usually can).

- or, if the the bios Setup has the SATA drive controller in SATA mode, a.k.a, AHCI mode, or RAID SATA or AHCI mode, then
you could make yourself a "slipstreamed" CD, preferably a CD-R, that has the contents of your Windows CD with the proper SATA controller drivers for your mboard integrated into it. If you Windows CD does not have SP3 updates integrated into it, then you might as well integrate the SP# updates into the contents of your CD while you're doing that.
Then you use the slipstreamed" Cd rather than your original CD to boot the computer with and install Windows
......

Your laser lens may be "dirty".

Try cleaning the laser lens on the optical drive you have the Windows CD in.
If you have a laptop, it's usually easy to clean the laser lens when the tray is ejected and there is no disk on the tray.
If you have a desktop computer, use a laser lens cleaning CD. If you don't have one, most places that sell CDs or DVDs have them, or even some "dollar" stores have them for a buck or two.

If you have more than one optical drive, you could try booting from the CD when it's in another drive.
However, some bioses will only boot from one optical drive - in that case, you need to find the list of optical drives in the bios, and make the first one in the list the drive you want to boot the CD from.
.....

If Setup gets through the first stage, you see "Setup will restart the computer in xx seconds " or similar, then the computer reboots and Setup does NOT get all the way through the second stage after you see "Setup is detecting hardware" or similar - typically the time remaining stalls for a long time at the same figure, then the computer black screens and starts the second stage of Setup all over again, in an endless loop, then Setup is having a problem detecting some hardware properly. In that case, for any computer, unplug everything plugged externally into the computer that is not essential for running Setup - e.g. a printer. If you have a desktop computer, remove the AC power to the case, make sure all cards and ram modules are all the way down in their slots, then try booting from the CD again. If you have a laptop, remove the AC adapter and the main battery, and re-seat your ram, then try booting from the CD again.
If you still get the endless loop during the second stage of Setup, if you have a desktop computer, remove the AC power to the case, remove all cards in slots that are not essential to running Setup, then try booting from the CD again. Them install the cards one by one after Setup has completed.



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#4
June 22, 2010 at 09:37:56
It sounds to me like your computer is bypassing your Windows disk and trying to boot to an existing installation.

What kind of Windows disk do you have? OEM restore type or full version?


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#5
June 22, 2010 at 12:40:55
I have a couple I was trying to use Windows XP Professional with service pack 3 for refurbished computers and it had gotten to like 7%, 9%, then to 35% and then froze

Then I tried using an OEM Restore one that my father gave me and that wudnt even load when it was in the blue set up part, and I also had this other cd that is it's own hacked XP OS called BartPE or something like that (it didn't need an install it just loaded it's own thing) All 3 don't load I have a feeling the CD drive is messed up


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#6
June 22, 2010 at 12:55:04
You should get NO ERRORS AT ALL when reading files from the CD during Setup. If clicking on Retry or similar does not help...
If you DO / DID get errors, something was not right !
See Response 7 in in this,
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
starting at

BELOW

"Errors reading from the CD can be caused by....."
.......

"...I tried using an OEM Restore one that my father gave me and that wudnt even load "

That probably won't work unless the Restore disk is for your same brand name and same model, or a model in a small group made by the same brand. The first Restore CD often checks to see whether the bios has the brand name's bios version, and/or has a specific mboard or a mboard in a small group of mboards - if it doesn't find something acceptable, the Restore program quits.
..........

You haven't supplied much useful information so far.

We need more info.

E.g. Answer these.

Is this a desktop computer or a laptop.

What brand name system and model is it, or if it's a beneric desktop system, what make and model of mboard does it have?

The specific model of a brand name system is shown on a label on the outside of the case somewhere, or it can often be determined by going to the brand name's web site.
The model, sometimes the make, of a mboard in a generic desktop system is usually printed on the mboard's surface in obvious larger characters, often between the slots.

The model is often also displayed on a logo (graphical) screen early in the boot, but it's often not as specific as the specific model number.

For Dell computers, they have a Service Tag number - the specific model can be determined by using that on their site, or can often be determined there automatically by you downloading some software. The Service Tag number should be on a label on the outside of the case, probably on the bottom on a laptop, on the back on a desktop, and is often also shown in the bios Setup.

Why are you trying to reload Windows?

Were you having problems previously?
If so, what were they ?

Did you install a new hard drive, or did you delete the data on the hard drive you had ?

Pressing F10 won't work properly if the data on the brand name system hard drive that makes possible running the Recovery procedure is is damaged, or if the hard drive is defective.

If it's not a new hard drive, did you test it with the hard drive manufacturer's diagnostics?


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#7
June 22, 2010 at 12:59:31
Why are you installing Windows anyway? Is this a new build or what?

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#8
June 25, 2010 at 14:28:53
I'm installing windows b/c I'm really not used to or experienced with other Operating system XP is the one I'm most used to as far as Windows

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#9
June 25, 2010 at 17:54:04
Do you have a SATA type hard drive? If so, you must somehow supply SATA controller drivers. Either at the beginning when it asks you or by slipstreaming them into the files currently on the disk and then burning a new disk.

Is there currently any version of Windows on the hard drive?


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#10
June 25, 2010 at 18:24:42
Hello,
It depends on the motherboard, as to whether sata is supported
some of the older ones, maybe not. All my computers are sata
and i had an old compaq with sata, Never had a problem with
windows xp and sata drives and i even use an ide to sata
adapter, on two computers right now.

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#11
June 25, 2010 at 18:38:40
Oops i meant sata to ide, anyway, many companies know
most people are still running xp and set them up to work
without extra drivers, this is a sata/xp computer no extra work.

( Ps i even got windows 98se to load on a sata drive but not
supported. Did run in fail safe mode.)

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#12
June 25, 2010 at 20:47:57
heh heh

See response 3 starting at :
"E.g.
If the hard drive is a SATA hard drive, the XP CD has no built in support for recognizing SATA drive controllers."
etc. etc.

If the mboard's bios has the SATA controller(s) in an IDE compatibilty mode, you DO NOT need to load SATA controller drivers - XP's (and 2000's) Setup will find the SATA drives fine, as an IDE compatible drive. 98SE will work fine if the SATA controller(s) is(are) in that mode, as well as XP and 2000, providing the mboard is not so new that ME and previous are not supported by the mboard (can't get main chipset drivers, etc.) .

Some new retail mboards come already set to that mode, e.g. I've seen that for several Asus models.
2000 and XP have no built in SATA controller drivers at all, but you may think they do if the mboard's bios has the SATA controller(s) in an IDE compatibility mode.


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#13
June 27, 2010 at 14:09:17
Yeah it is SATA but when the diagnostic thing starts before the bios it shows the SATA drive as an IDE hard drive

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#14
June 27, 2010 at 15:59:40
Answer the questions I asked in the last part of Response 6.

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#15
June 28, 2010 at 15:32:23
I pretty much had problems with Windows rebooting itself at different points, whether it was loading Windows with the bar going or when I finally got into a user it would load and then reboot... So I decided to just reinstall windows and it didn't really work reinstalling it onto the original HD that came with the computer.

The Windows CD I use now will always freeze in the part where it is copying the files necessary to install windows, aka sometimes it freezes when copying drivers.cab or some other files


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#16
June 29, 2010 at 10:42:05
See the first thing in Response 6.

Included in that info - (after you have made sure you do not have a ram problem or any drive connection problem)

It's a waste of your time trying to install anything on a defective hard drive.

Check your hard drive with the manufacturer's diagnostics.
See the latter part of response 1 in this:
http://www.computing.net/windows95/...

(thanks to Dan Penny for this link:)
Hard Drive Diagnostics Tools and Utilities
http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm...

If you don't have a floppy drive, you can get a CD image diagnostic utility from most hard drive manufacturer's web sites, but obviously you would need to make a burned CD, preferably a CD-R for best compatibility, on another computer if you need to.

If the hard drive itself tests okay, any data problems found can be fixed, one way or another.


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#17
June 30, 2010 at 14:49:38
please check the cd rom is working fine
otherwise change the cd rom
i think slove your problem

if any problem then talk with me on msn messenger

thanks
ghazanfarali_1@hotmail.com


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