Solved No TV video output

June 20, 2012 at 11:48:27
Specs: Windows 7 Ultimate SP1 x64
Hello everybody,

I'm in desperate need of your help.
I have a new computer. Along with it, I've purchased a legacy GeForce 8600 GT (256MB).
This video card has a TV-out: A 7-pin S-video output.

I'm using a 4-Pin S-Video to 3 RCA + 3.5mm audio jack (see here for more info, please), but I can't seem to get any picture. Audio works fine. I can hear whatever's being played but no video.

It seems the computer does detect the TV. When I click on "detect", I can see my desktop for a split second but then it goes away.

I installed the latest NVIDIA driver compatible with my OS (7, Ultimate, SP1, 64bit).

I tried to review the settings in the NVIDIA control panel but to no avail. The option to "Force TV detection" is disabled.

Any ideas what to do? Could it be the cable? Do I need a 7-pin or is the 4-pin compatible?

Thanks again. I really appreciate it!

"I'm tired. But then again I'm so hungry I can't sleep. But what's the point of eating if your sleepy?" - Sniff, The Moomins.


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✔ Best Answer
June 30, 2012 at 23:10:26
Hi.

So, as promised, I'm posting back with an update:
As far as the GeForce 8600 GT goes, nothing worked. I tried numerous options and changed several settings. My guess is that the TV-OUT port is malfunctioning.

Then I installed the GeForce 7200GS and everything worked perfectly!
The good news is that my friend, being the good friend that he is, has agreed to swap video adapters - seeing as he doesn't need the S-video/TV-OUT port.

@Tubesandwires: Again, I can't thank you enough for all your help. It's nice to have someone professional to talk to! And as far as the "dedicated 4-pin S-video port", I'd like to believe you learn something new every day. :)

Thanks again!

"I'm tired. But then again I'm so hungry I can't sleep. But what's the point of eating if your sleepy?" - Sniff, The Moomins.



#1
June 20, 2012 at 13:11:08
The TV must be set to the proper input source with it's remote control or otherwise - e.g. Video1, Video2, Aux1, VCR1, whatever - and the cables must be connected between the TV ports and the ports on the computer including on the video card BEFORE you boot the computer.

I'm assuming you have a computer monitor connected to the video card as well as the cable to the TV.

Windows only enables one display by default.
RIGHT click on a blank part of the main desktop screen, choose Personalize, then Display Settings.
Hold your cursor over each of the two icons that look like a monitor - one of them will display "Not Active" or similar - RIGHT click on that icon and ENABLE the display.

Windows will retain the second display as long as the cables are still plugged into the TV when the computer is booted, but if the S-Video plug and/or the RCA plug to the yellow RCA jack on the TV is ever not connected while booting, Windows will revert to only one display being enabled.
....

Windows looks relatively crappy on the TV in comparison to what you see on a computer monitor when you use a legacy composite video or S-Video connection.

If your TV supports a HD composite video connection - it has three RCA jacks for the video, red, blue, and green, you can buy newer video cards that have a port that supports connecting to the TV that way, and that will look much better.



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#2
June 20, 2012 at 14:53:42
Hi again.

First, thanks for replying.
The TV is indeed set to the proper input source. (In my case "Video 3", as "Video 1" is taken. and "Video 2" is not in use - although I tried that as well).
As for the cables, everything was connected even before I turned on the pc for the first time and installed my OS.

Your asuumption is correct. I do have a computer monitor connected as well as the cable TV.
I would like to point out, however, that I have another computer at another room and it is connected to a different TV. Again, with S-video. I don't have HD here, so it's legacy all-around. The display settings there are actually two desktops where I drag the video file to the other desktop (being the TV) and playing it full-screen.

As for your instructions, I'm afraid I don't have "enable". Only "Indetify" and "properties". Could this be realted to the fact I'm using a 4-pin S-video card whereas my video card has a 7-pin?

I just don't get it... NVIDIA Control Panel lists the TV but whenver I try to change any setting, my monitor goes blank. It's really all too confusing to explain, so forgive me if I'm throwing you off course.

"I'm tired. But then again I'm so hungry I can't sleep. But what's the point of eating if your sleepy?" - Sniff, The Moomins.


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#3
June 20, 2012 at 16:46:11
"Windows only enables one display by default.
RIGHT click on a blank part of the main desktop screen, choose Personalize, then Display Settings.
Hold your cursor over each of the two icons that look like a monitor - one of them will display "Not Active" or similar - RIGHT click on that icon and ENABLE the display"

I answered this topic when I was using XP.
I wasn't sure what you see in Windows 7, which is probably exactly the same as I see in Vista, so I loaded Vista on my dual boot system.

I have a video card installed that supports two displays - I'm seeing two icons there.

Are you seeing two icons that look like a monitor at the described location ?

If NO, the software for the NVidia Geforce 8600 GT card has NOT been installed properly. There should be (at least) two icons there even when the TV is not connected to the computer.

If YES, when you RIGHT click on the icon that displays "Not Active" when you hold your mouse cursor over it, select Attached to ENABLE the display, when the cables have been connected properly from the computer to the TV.

"Could this be realted to the fact I'm using a 4-pin S-video card whereas my video card has a 7-pin?"

The port on the video card is an "S-Video" port, as in, it's not actually called that, but it's physically and electrically / electronically compatible with plugging in a standard legacy 4 pin S-Video connector into it - a legacy S-Video port has only 4 pin holes.
Your cables don't need what's available from the other three pin holes in order for you to get TV Out video from the video card on the TV.


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Related Solutions

#4
June 21, 2012 at 07:23:42
I've added screenshots, so you could see the exact thing I'm seeing:

First one is of the "screen resolution" menu, where you can see several monitors. I'm guessing the 3rd one is the TV.
Second screenshot is of the NVIDIA settings. Notice the TV is showing.
However, if I click the "My display in not shown", I get screenshot #3.
When I click on "Rigorous Display Detection", I can see my desktop background on the TV, but just for a split second before the TV goes dark (or blue, in my case) again. Then I get a notice (screenshot #4) where whether I click "Yes" or "No" nothing happens.

I've also added a fifth screenshot. In there, no matter what option I set, my PC monitor goes dark and I am forced to restart -- going back to square one.

Thank you for you help. I can't thank you enough.

"I'm tired. But then again I'm so hungry I can't sleep. But what's the point of eating if your sleepy?" - Sniff, The Moomins.


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#5
June 21, 2012 at 08:45:18
Assuming there's nothing iffy about the connection of the S-video to RCA plug cable to the yellow RCA jack on the TV, at the location in your 5th image, you must correctly select the type of TV you have.

If you're in North America and the TV was bought in North America, the TV Format must be set to NTSC of some sort.
If you're in the UK or Europe, and the TV was bought in the same country as you live, that must be set to PAL or SECAM of some sort, probably the former.

The Resolution setting depends on what the TV is capable of displaying.

Older TV models CANNOT display xxxxi or xxxxp anything.

For older TVs, the (vertical) Refresh rate is 60Hz for North American TVs; for most other places in the world 50Hz

The Color depth also depends on what the TV is capable of, but that may not result in you getting no display - it just may look better or worse depending on what you choose. I would guess it should be the same as what you computer monitor is using for the best looking result.

I do not have NVidia video drivers installed on any of my computers, so I don't know what other things you can select there.

If you don't know what to set those to, supply the make and model of the TV - the specific model is probably either printed on the back of the TV or on a stuck on label there.


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#6
June 21, 2012 at 14:23:16
Well, if it helps my previous computer worked just fine with this cable. It was a Geforce 5500FX.

And about the 5th image - that's just it -- whenever I change the settings there, my PC monitor goes blank and I have to restart in order to get it working again.
I did manage to change settings after several attempts but nothing happened. :(

We use PAL over here and My TV is Toshiba 29" (2990XEL), if it helps. The TV is set to support both PAL and NTSC. I guess that if that was the case, I'd get the picture in black and white instead of color.

Any ideas what I should do?

"I'm tired. But then again I'm so hungry I can't sleep. But what's the point of eating if your sleepy?" - Sniff, The Moomins.


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#7
June 22, 2012 at 08:17:15
"And about the 5th image - that's just it -- whenever I change the settings there, my PC monitor goes blank and I have to restart in order to get it working again."

That CANNOT happen unless you're trying to change the settings for the computer monitor instead of the TV.

Windows shows the settings for the primary display - identified as #1 - in Display Settings by default.
In this case, that's the external computer monitor.

To set anything for other displays, you have to click on the icon for the appropriate display in Display Settings, BEFORE you change any settings.

In your (linked to) second screen shot, you click on the icon identified as #2 for the TV

By the way, you haven't mentioned whether "Not Active" was displayed when you held your cursor over the TV display in Display Settings, and if so, whether you have RIGHT clicked on the icon for the TV display in Display Settings and selected Attached.
There MUST be a check mark before Attached there.
...........


"We use PAL over here and My TV is Toshiba 29" (2990XEL), if it helps."

"We use PAL..."

That helps, somewhat.

What country was the TV bought in ?

".....My TV is Toshiba 29" (2990XEL), "

That doesn't.

Is it a CRT TV or a LCD TV ?

I cannot find any Toshiba 29" model 2990XEL or 2990 anything

It appears all Toshiba LCD and LED LCD TV models have at least one letter after the diagonal size of the screen.
E.g. the LCD model 26SL400U

From the Toshiba FAQs......

Where can I find the model number?
Your model number is on the ratings label situated on the rear of the unit (next to the serial number).

"The TV is set to support both PAL and NTSC."

I have never come across a specific TV model that supports both PAL and NTSC legacy TV standards, but I have come across the same model that supports one or the other of them, depending on which country it was sold in.
If there is a setting in the TV's own settings where you can choose one or the other, which I doubt, it must be set to whatever the 8600 GT card's TVOut supports, which is probably PAL if the video card was bought in a country that uses the PAL legacy TV standards.

Also, there ARE some video card video chipsets that support both the PAL and NTSC legacy TV standards for TVOut, but only one of them at a time, and the right one must be selected for your situation.
If you want to know whether that applies to your 8600 GT video card, you need to supply it's make and specific model. The specific model is probably either printed on the surface of the video card, or on a stuck on label on it.


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#8
June 22, 2012 at 12:24:09
I'm really sorry I haven't been able to be more specific in regards to the TV model.
I was wrong. It's a CRT. And the correct model is: 29A3SH.

As for your questions:
(1) "That CANNOT happen unless you're trying to change the settings for the computer monitor instead of the TV."
I'm afraid it does happen. And I really can't understand why. I can't set these settings for the computer monitor, because they don't exist (i.e - PAL/NTSC). Notice that in the 5th screenshot, TV is selected (green rectangular around it). The computer monitor has different settings.

(2) Number 2 is actually my current/primary display. And I realise that. I've tried to change settings to my 3rd display (by clicking it or selecting it), which is the TV but nothing budges. I've no idea why there's another one (#1). I'm guessing it's the DVI connector - but I have nothing connected to it.

(3) As for "Active/Not Active", I don't have that option. Upon right clicking any monitor (just helding my cursor over the display does nothing, except allow my to change the order), I either get 'Identify' or 'Properties'. The 'Identify' just presents a large number on my computer monitor (#2) and nothing else on the TV. And 'Properties' gets me to my NVIDIA 8600 properties (via device manager). I'm afraid there's no "Attach" option either.

TV was bought in Israel (Meaning, PAL). I tried setting the TV to PAL and NTSC, but it doesn't seem to work. As for the video card itself, I can only say that it was purchased from Korea. At the moment, I can't provide a specific label.

However, In the following week or so, I will be able to acquire a different graphic card (NVIDIA GeForce 7200GS 512MB. This one has a dedicated 4-pin S-video port) from a friend of mine. If you have any other ideas or suggestions, I'll happily accept them.

Regardless, I'll post back again.

Can't stress enough: I appreciate your effort in helping me solve this problem.

"I'm tired. But then again I'm so hungry I can't sleep. But what's the point of eating if your sleepy?" - Sniff, The Moomins.


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#9
June 22, 2012 at 15:43:52
"It's a CRT. And the correct model is: 29A3SH."
"TV was bought in Israel (Meaning, PAL)."

I cannot find any English info, specifications, or free manuals for 29A3SH.

Toshiba no longer has any support for any of it's CRT TVs models on any of the web sites I looked at - Israel, Europe, headquarters in Japan in English.

This web site says you can Buy the manual for Toshiba 29A3SH from them:
http://getmanual.com/

Do you have a printed manual for it ?

PAL
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PAL

Excerpts:

PAL, short for Phase Alternating Line, is an analogue television colour encoding system used in broadcast television systems in many countries.

PAL broadcast systems
This table illustrates the differences:

PAL B PAL G, H PAL I PAL D/K PAL M PAL N
Transmission Band VHF UHF UHF/VHF* VHF/UHF VHF/UHF VHF/UHF
Fields 50 50 50 50 60 50
Lines 625 625 625 625 525 625

PAL-B/G/D/K/I

The majority of countries using PAL have television standards with 625 lines and 25 frames per second,

(50 cycles/second = 50 Hz vertical frequency - the same as the AC power in the country uses; 625i, i = interlaced; the odd lines are displayed for a frame, then the even lines for a frame, alternately; frames per second = half the vertical frequency for an interlaced display. )

Countries and territories that once used PAL

Israel
Switched to DVB-T 14 June 2011

DVB-T
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVB-T
.....

If the TV was made before June 2011 it's using a PAL standard of some sort.
.....

"As for the video card itself, I can only say that it was purchased from Korea. "

Korea used the NTSC TV standard, which i assume has been changed to a digital TV standard recently, as it has been in the US and Canada.

NTSC
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NTSC

Excerpts:

NTSC, named for the National Television System Committee,[1] is the analog television system that is used in most of North America, parts of South America (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and French Guiana), Burma, South Korea, Taiwan, Japan, the Philippines, and some Pacific island nations and territories (see map).
.....

If the 8600 GT video card supports ONLY NTSC TVOut standards, then it's impossible to get a legacy composite video or S-Video display on a TV that supports only PAL standards.

As I said in response 7....

""The TV is set to support both PAL and NTSC.""

"I have never come across a specific TV model that supports both PAL and NTSC legacy TV standards, but I have come across the same model that supports one or the other of them, depending on which country it was sold in.
If there is a setting in the TV's own settings where you can choose one or the other, which I doubt, it must be set to whatever the 8600 GT card's TVOut supports, which is probably PAL if the video card was bought in a country that uses the PAL legacy TV standards. "

However, as I said in response 7...

"Also, there ARE some video card video chipsets that support both the PAL and NTSC legacy TV standards for TVOut, but only one of them at a time, and the right one must be selected for your situation.
If you want to know whether that applies to your 8600 GT video card, you need to supply it's make and specific model. The specific model is probably either printed on the surface of the video card, or on a stuck on label on it. "
..............

""And about the 5th image - that's just it -- whenever I change the settings there, my PC monitor goes blank and I have to restart in order to get it working again.""

"That CANNOT happen unless you're trying to change the settings for the computer monitor instead of the TV."

"I'm afraid it does happen."

I have no idea what the effect would be if your 8600 GT card can only support NTSC TVOut, or if it can either PAL or NTSC TVOut and it is set to NTSC

Other than that, there's no way the settings for the TV display could affect the computer monitor's display.

I live in Canada which used NTSC standards until recently, and have never installed a video card that supports only PAL TVOut, or a video card that supports both PAL and NTSC TVOut and the card was set to PAL.

"Number 2 is actually my current/primary display."

Apparently your 8600 GT card must have two monitor ports as well as the "S-Video" port, which isn't what it's actually called - you're seeing three possible displays in Display Settings in Windows.
One of the monitor ports is the card's (video chipset's) primary port; the other one is the card's secondary port.
Going by what I've seen in the past when the video card has two monitor ports, when you have only one computer monitor connected to one of the two computer monitor ports, it may identify (number) the monitor according to which port the card sees it as - if the monitor is plugged into the card's secondary monitor port, the Display Settings may see it as #2.
Your first screen shot image shows that. However, it's still the default = pirmary monitor in Display settings in Windows.

That is DIFFERENT from what number the NVidia software identifies it as in your second sreen shot image.


"As for "Active\Not Active", I don't have that option."

I didn't say it was an option. I said when you hold your mouse cursor over the icons, in your case, at least one for the monitor port nothing is connected to, if not two for both that and the TVOut connection, should display "Not Active" in a small baloon when you do that.

"Upon right clicking any monitor (just helding my cursor over the display does nothing, except allow my to change the order), I either get 'Identify' or 'Properties'. The 'Identify' just presents a large number on my computer monitor (#2) and nothing else on the TV. And 'Properties' gets me to my NVIDIA 8600 properties (via device manager). I'm afraid there's no "Attach" option either."

Did you RIGHT click on the icons ?

I was talking about what you see in Display Settings in Windows itself. I have no idea what you see in the NVidia software.
If you ARE talking about you see in Display Settings in Windows itself, I don't have a Windows 7 installation to look at, but as far as I know you should see the same things in Display Settings as I see in Vista.
Windows 7 is based on Vista and most things are exactly the same in both.

Are you SURE you installed the software for the 8600 GT card properly ?
E.g.
You DO NOT install drivers for it when Found New Hardware pops up for it !!


"However, In the following week or so, I will be able to acquire a different graphic card (NVIDIA GeForce 7200GS 512MB. This one has a dedicated 4-pin S-video port) from a friend of mine"

Make sure it supports PAL TVOut.

There is no such thing as a video card or a video adapter that has a legacy S-Video port with only 4 pin holes - all the "S-Video" ports, which isn't what they're actually called, for video adapters have more than 4 pin holes, but as I said above "..... it's physically and electrically / electronically compatible with plugging in a standard legacy 4 pin S-Video connector into it - a legacy S-Video port has only 4 pin holes. "
The video card may come with a "dongle" that plugs into the more than 4 pin hole "S-Video" port that has a cable that has a 4 pin legacy S-video inline port connector (4 pin holes) , or just a standard legacy S-Video 4 pin male to one RCA jack female gender adapter.


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#10
June 23, 2012 at 01:09:45
Thanks for the input!
I don't have a manual. I have this TV for quite some time now.

I have indeed right click the icons - which only allowed to "Identify" or check "Properties". (As similar to the way you would right click a folder and get options). "Hovering" over the icons doesn't display a tooltip.

I've installed the latest driver from the official NVIDIA website.

"There is no such thing as a video card or a video adapter that has a legacy S-Video port with only 4 pin holes - all the "S-Video" ports, which isn't what they're actually called, for video adapters have more than 4 pin holes."
I'm not sure what you mean. My other computer is equipped with a Geforce and it has a 4-pin S-video output (see here).

I'll review the settings once more and check with my friend's card. I'll keep you posted.

Thanks again!

"I'm tired. But then again I'm so hungry I can't sleep. But what's the point of eating if your sleepy?" - Sniff, The Moomins.


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#11
June 23, 2012 at 06:41:26
"My other computer is equipped with a Geforce and it has a 4-pin S-video output (see here)."

Okay, so I was wrong, some video cards have a true legacy 4 pin hole S-Video port. However, that's the very first one I've EVER seen. I've fiddled with lots of video cards that had a "S-Video" port, and as I recall and for the ones I have on hand, ALL of them have had more than 4 pin holes.


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#12
June 30, 2012 at 23:10:26
✔ Best Answer
Hi.

So, as promised, I'm posting back with an update:
As far as the GeForce 8600 GT goes, nothing worked. I tried numerous options and changed several settings. My guess is that the TV-OUT port is malfunctioning.

Then I installed the GeForce 7200GS and everything worked perfectly!
The good news is that my friend, being the good friend that he is, has agreed to swap video adapters - seeing as he doesn't need the S-video/TV-OUT port.

@Tubesandwires: Again, I can't thank you enough for all your help. It's nice to have someone professional to talk to! And as far as the "dedicated 4-pin S-video port", I'd like to believe you learn something new every day. :)

Thanks again!

"I'm tired. But then again I'm so hungry I can't sleep. But what's the point of eating if your sleepy?" - Sniff, The Moomins.


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#13
July 1, 2012 at 06:44:39
We're glad to hear that you have solved your problem.

Thanks for the Thanks.


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