No Keyboard After Restore/Mouse Ok

Hp media center / M7350n
March 9, 2009 at 10:24:13
Specs: Windows XP MCE
I performed a system restore after having some problems with Kaspersky not working correctly.
After the computer rebooted, it went to the Windows login screen where I normally type my password for XP to start up.
My keyboard will not work. Mouse works fine.
Its a ps/2 kb and a usb mouse.
I tried with a working kb, also tried a working usb kb. Neither worked.
I also tried plugging in a ps/2 mouse. It will work until I start typing on one of the kb's at the login screen then it stops working. The usb kb always works.

I do have kb use in BIOS and DOS screen. It stops when it begins loading Win drivers, I believe.

I cannot boot into a proper Safe Mode (any of them). After my choices in F8, any SM choice brings up a black screen with the Safe Mode info in the 4 corners of the screen. Mouse works during this time, but nothing to do.

I cannot find any options in BIOS for a keyboard, only for a mouse. The Legacy option IS enabled in BIOS.

I'm running an HP M7350N computer with Win XP MCE, SP3, it came preinstalled with Windows. I have no disc's with the computer, they didn't give me any. The only disc's I have on hand is a Win98SE disc, a WinXP Pro Upgrade disc and my two Windows XP MCE Recovery discs that I made last August after reading an article that I should have them.

I have tried rebooting from the disc drive to start a Repair, but it will not boot from either of my two disc drives. I have no floppy drive.

I'm at my wit's end. I spent the whole day yesterday searching for idea's to try, nothing has worked. I have a lot of important data on that drive that I (sigh) have not backed up lately.

I plan on getting the data off the drive and trying a Recovery. When I tried to do a Restore thru the Recovery in the DOS screen, it only stood at a blinking cursor. I had to cold boot it to start over.

What am I missing here? Help?

Thank you


See More: No Keyboard After Restore/Mouse Ok

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#1
March 9, 2009 at 18:58:43
There is never any setting to enable/disable a PS/2 keyboard in the bios Setup. It should always work in the bios Setup pages, and to get you into the bios. The Legacy setting must be enabled in order for you to get into the bios with a USB keyboard and to use a USB keyboard in the bios. Most bioses have no support for using a mouse of any type in the bios.

Devices connected to PS/2 ports are normally very reliable. You can have problems with wires getting broken inside the cord - wiggling the cord near where it enters the device, or on the other end, or trying another keyboard or mouse, or trying your keyboard or mouse on another computer, should reveal whether you have that problem.

A simple adapter (one without any obvious extra circuitry in the wiring) that you connect to the USB connector on the end of a keyboard or mouse cord to convert so it can be plugged into a PS/2 will not work unless the keyboard or mouse is a "combo" type that was designed and wired up to be used with both types of ports - if it's a "combo" model that's often obvious on it's label, and it came with such a simple adapter..

I would think the most likely thing is your power supply is failing.
Your optical drives, floppy drive, PS/2 keyboards and mice, serial ports, and USB devices will not work correctly if the PS is not producing enough of what is supposed to be an accurate +5v, or they can be damaged in a short time if the PS is producing too much of what is supposed to be an accurate +5v. Since USB keyboards and mice draw very little current, they may be the last things to stop working.

If you still have the original power supply, it's capacity is only 300 watts. Your original GeForce 6200SE PCI-E X16 video card works fine with your system with that power supply capacity, but if you have upgraded it that may not be enough power anymore.
If that applies, look on the web site of the card maker at the specs of the card model and find the minimum PS capacity, and possibly the minimum current a PS must supply at 12v - that's often listed under system requirements.

Failing power supplies are common and can cause your symptoms.
Check your PS.
See response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

If it's a standard sized PS, it can be replaced with any decent standard (PS/2) sized ATX PS that has the same capacity / current rating at 12v or better.

Standard PS/2 size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.
........

"two Windows XP MCE Recovery discs that I made last August after reading an article that I should have them."

You were wise to do that, but there's something you may not be aware of.
All the MCE CDs have bugs that have never been fixed.
When you are about 2/3 of the way setting up Windows and loading files from the first CD, Setup asks you to insert a CD but it's title is WRONG. You MUST insert the second CD at that point. After Windows has loaded a bunch of files from the second CD, Setup asks you to insert a CD but it's title is ALSO WRONG. You MUST insert the first CD at that point, then Setup will complete sucessfully.

If you get/got confused and do/did NOT do all of that, which has happened to a lot of people, MCE is NOT installed properly. You must start over again and do it the proper way.


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#2
March 9, 2009 at 21:13:54
Try booting up without a mouse and see if the KB will work.

You say it's not booting from your CDs. Make sure the cdrom is set as the first boot device in cmos/bios setup.


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#3
March 11, 2009 at 14:55:13
Okay...so if the PSU is the case, then if I disconnect both of my optical drives, use only the usb keyboard and maybe the usb mouse...would you say I should be able to log into Windows? If it worked, then I would say...PSU.

And...if this is the case, why does the usb keyboard work in BIOS, DOS, but not at the login screen if it uses a small amount of power?

I did use two different keyboards. I have several computers in the house, so I tried a working usb keyboard when the ps/2 didn't work. I didn't use a converter.

Do you think lack of power is what is causing the desktop to be black in SafeMode?

I do know that strange things can happen when power is involved. Just look at a mobo when lightning has hit it. You never really know exactly what path it took or would take.

The PSU does sound like what it could be, I'd like to be sure before I order a new one. I have my hd out of the case at this time, getting data off of it. After I put it back in, I'll test it w/out the optical drives and see how it goes.

As for the second poster, I'll try that and yes...I did boot up on the disc...I knew to do that. I should have mentioned that, sorry.

Thanks for the suggestions, I'll follow up asap.


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Related Solutions

#4
March 11, 2009 at 21:53:56
"The PSU does sound like what it could be, I'd like to be sure before I order a new one. "

See this if you haven't already:

Failing power supplies are common and can cause your symptoms.
Check your PS.
See response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

If it is defective, you can often find at least some of the things mentioned in that are out of whack.

It's impossible to predict how a defective PS will behave. If I were you I would stop trying to use it - it it fails completely, there's a definite chance it will damage something - often the mboard - while failing.

If you can borrow a known working PS with enough wattage capacity (300 or more) temporarily and plug it into your system, or try your PS with another working computer, that will reveal right away whether the PS is defective or it's another problem, without you taking the risk of buying a new PS which may not help.

Did you install a different video card on the system?
If so, check out the info in response one - you may need a PS with more capacity.

Don't buy an el-cheapo power supply.
See response 3:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...



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#5
March 11, 2009 at 22:42:00
No, I did not replace the video card.
I don't know anyone of whom I can borrow their power supply...that's why I was wondering if I disconnected the optical drives if it would have enuf juice to login.

I read and understand all the links you posted, thanks.


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#6
March 12, 2009 at 09:08:02
Sorry, this double-posted for some reason. =\

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#7
March 12, 2009 at 12:18:12
So what happened when you booted up with no mouse attached?

I doubt it's a bad PSU. This happened right after a restore so it's logical to suspect that. Sure, a bad PSU could have caused a bad restore but so could a lot of other things--RAM, HD, bad restore file, etc. There's also the possibility that the 'Kaspersky not working correctly' might have been a symptom of a bigger problem.


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#8
March 18, 2009 at 09:00:21
I've been waiting on a delivery of a sata/ide to usb case so I could transfer the data off of my drive in case I lose anything. I just got it and am doing that now.

Are there any logs that I could look at or post here to see what's going on at boot up?

Thanks


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#9
March 18, 2009 at 11:54:58
You can enable boot logging as one of the options in the boot choices menu when you press F8 repeatedly while booting - it's not enabled by default - if you copy data contents before doing that it won't be there - if you can't get boot logging to work, or if you can't get into Windows, then you can't do that or the log file will not have been completed .
.......

There's definately something wrong with your power supply....

- if a known working PS/2 keyboard does not work properly on your computer before Windows attempts to load.
- if a PS/2 mouse is enabled in your bios settings, if a known working PS/2 mouse does not work properly on your computer before Windows attempts to load.

"I have tried rebooting from the disc drive to start a Repair, but it will not boot from either of my two disc drives."

- if your bios boot order settings were set so when you inserted a bootable CD ( a CD drive must be listed before all hard drives in the boot order), you previously got the prompt while booting "Press any key to boot from CD" or similar, and that is no longer working.

However..

Many bioses will only boot a bootable CD or DVD from one optical drive if you have more than one connected. In that case, there is a list of the optical drives in the bios, often near the boot order settings, and the drive you want to be able to boot from has to be listed first. You can change that if you need to.

If the optical drive is SATA connected, many mboards with SATA built in have some SATA headers you can connect a drive to you can't boot a hard drive or a bootable optical disk from - see the mboard manual - in that case sometimes the SATA headers are 2 different colors.
........

The chances are very much in your favour there's nothing wrong with you hard drive(s) physically, but the data on it can certainly be screwed up.
Your power supply must be working correctly in order to test it.

Check your hard drive with the manufacturer's diagnostics.
See the latter part of response 1 in this:
http://www.computing.net/windows95/...

(thanks to Dan Penny for this link:)
Hard Drive Diagnostics Tools and Utilities
http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm...

If you don't have a floppy drive, you can get a CD image diagnostic utility from most hard drive manufacturer's web sites, but obviously you would need to make a burned CD, preferably a CD-R for best compatibilty, on another computer if you need to.

If the hard drive itself tests okay, any data problems found can be fixed, one way or another.
.......

If you connect the hard drive to another desktop computer, do not boot from that drive.
If you boot from it,
- if the mboards are more that a little different Windows will not load - typically you see the first bit of Windows graphics, then a black screen, blinking cursor top left, and nothing firther happens .

- if Windows does load, it will load support for the other mboard rather than your own, and there will probably be some things Windows doesn't have built in drivers for that won't work

Even if your data is screwed up on the hard drive, your keyboards and mice should always work fine at least until when Windows starts to load - the data on the hard drive has absolutely nothing to do with either of those not working before then - a defective power supply DOES.

Corded mice or keyboards can develop broken wires inside the cable that cause them to not work, but trying them on another computer, or trying other known working mice and keyboards on your computer, which you're saying you did, can easily determine whether that applies.


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#10
March 27, 2009 at 22:06:30
Okay guys...
I just purchased and installed a 500w OCZ StealthStream PSU.

The keyboard STILL does not work at the Windows login screen.

This is what I tried this evening so far with the new PSU...

I booted up normally. PS/2 keyboard and my USB mouse. I got to the login screen and the mouse worked to move the pointer to a cursor on the line, but the keyboard would not work. I plugged in a working USB KB and it would not work to type in my password.

All keyboards and mouse that I use are in working order.

The kb's DO WORK in BIOS.

I shut down the pc.

I unplugged both kb's and the mouse. I rebooted. I did not get any warning that there was no kb plugged into the unit. I usually get this warning on other computers when I boot up with no kb. I didn't with this one.

When the login screen came up, I plugged in the USB kb and the USB mouse. The mouse worked. The kb didn't.

I then got a working PS/2 mouse and plugged it in. The PS/2 kb was plugged in and so was the USB mouse. I booted up and the USB mouse worked, the PS/2 mouse worked, but the kb's wouldn't work.

SO, it seems to be something with just the keyboards, both USB and PS/2.
I'm guessing a driver?

Any suggestions ?
Thank you.


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#11
March 28, 2009 at 16:26:40
Check for keyboard support in cmos/bios setup but I think you're right that it's a driver/OS problem. You can't fix it unless you can get into windows and you can't get into windows unless you fix it. You may want to repost in the XP forum. See if it's possible to try another restore even with the limited OS you have now. Or you may need to do a repair install.

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#12
March 28, 2009 at 16:59:50
I can connect the hard drive to another computer using a sata/ide to usb converter.

Is there anything in Windows XP that I could change to allow the Admin password to be blank?

What about changing something in Windows to roll it back to the previous state before the restore?


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#13
March 28, 2009 at 19:32:19
Okay, I managed to get the computer to boot up into the Recovery mode using the Recovery Disc's I created at one time. My Windows XP Upgrade disc will not work to go into Repair mode.

I was able to do the type of a Restore that puts you back into Windows without deleting all of your programs.

So far, other than all of my shortcuts missing from my desktop and Quick Launch toolbar...I don't see any of my email anywhere that I had in Outlook Express. =(


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#14
March 28, 2009 at 19:50:12
Does the keyboard work?

The restore disks probably took it back to before you had the shortcuts or emails stored. If the KB is working you may be able to check the available XP restore points and go back to something newer than the disks had. Or you may want to leave well enough alone and not try anything else.


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#15
March 29, 2009 at 11:00:34
"Okay, I managed to get the computer to boot up into the Recovery mode using the Recovery Disc's I created at one time."

"I was able to do the type of a Restore that puts you back into Windows without deleting all of your programs.

So far, other than all of my shortcuts missing from my desktop and Quick Launch toolbar...I don't see any of my email anywhere that I had in Outlook Express. =( "

The shortcuts can easily be re-made, at least for things that are still there.

If you mean the set you make with the HP supplied program, when I used the Compaq disk set, I wiped everything and loaded the original software because the hard drive's data was trashed - I'm not sure what your choice does.

Search for *.wab (Windows Address Book).

It's normally in C:\Documents andSettings\(user name\.... somewhere.

That's where Outlook Express keeps it's list of email addresses you add. If that still has the email addresses you added, you may still be able to recover your email.

If the email addresses you added are not there, default Outlook Express settings have been loaded, and you probably cannot recover your email, and any attachments downloaded with incoming email for it.
In theory you can use a program that recovers deleted files, but that should be done preferably as soon as possible and preferably before you start up Windows again, because otherwise the Windows swap file or other files have probably already over-written the places on the drive where most if not all the files you need to restore are.


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#16
March 29, 2009 at 11:38:57
"My Windows XP Upgrade disc will not work to go into Repair mode."

According to the original specs for your model and your own information above, you have XP MCE (2005). There's no such thing as an upgrade CD for that as far as I know, and if there were it would be two CDs not one for MCE - MCE doesn't fit on one CD.
I don't think an upgrade CD will work for that purpose in any case.

You only have the second Repair (not Recover) choice when you run Setup from the CD if certain needed data on the existing Windows installation is not corrupted or missing.


"Okay, I managed to get the computer to boot up into the Recovery mode using the Recovery Disc's I created at one time."
"I was able to do the type of a Restore that puts you back into Windows without deleting all of your programs."

If you meant you used this 2 disk set:
""two Windows XP MCE Recovery discs that I made last August after reading an article that I should have them."

they're probably not Recovery disks - they're probably copies of the two OEM MCE CDs.

See the last part of Response1 to see whether you have used them correctly - if you haven't, Windows cannot work correctly, you may have lost your Outlook Express personal files, and you must run Setup again - you may NOT have the second Repair choice again if you didn't insert the CDs at the right times the first time.



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#17
March 29, 2009 at 13:54:47
You know how u can boot up with your Windows disc and then you can choose to either Repair, Install...and something else, I can't remember right now...(sorry, bad headache). It has the blue screen and when u select Repair, it takes u to a DOS like screen where you can start a Repair.

I could never get to that. That's what I wanted to do because I thought it might be able to recover a normal boot up with the correct drivers...but maybe not.

My computer didn't come with any disc's. But, I do have other computers running XP Pro, so I used an Upgrade disc to try to get into Repair mode. I thought that any XP Pro disc could do that on an XP Pro (which is kinda what MCE is) system.

An explanation for the discs for XP is here:
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/...

I know how to get all my shortcuts back and find the mail folders...I just haven't had time to do that yet. Just trying to get my desktop reorganized and everything back the way I am accustomed to having it has taken up a lot of my time. =\


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#18
March 29, 2009 at 16:51:10
"An explanation for the discs for XP is here:..."

Okay, so you made the Recovery disks using the HP program. That's a good thing - many people never bother to do that then come here and ask what they can do when their system is no longer working.

I had thought maybe you had made copies of the OEM XP MCE CDs

"I thought that any XP Pro disc could do that on an XP Pro (which is kinda what MCE is) system."

Upgrade disks usually can't be used, at least not without losing what is already on the Windows partition.
.
If it had been a full version XP Pro CD if you installed Windows from scratch or ran a Repair Setup (see next) your MCE installation would have been gone in the first case, and may or may not be gone in the second case.

XP MCE is XP Pro with a few features most people don't use omitted, plus the major Media Center group of programs and a lot more multimedia support. It doesn't fit on one CD, and can only be restored on it's own from the 2 CD OEM MCE set.


"You know how u can boot up with your Windows disc and then you can choose to either Repair, Install...and something else, I can't remember right now...(sorry, bad headache). It has the blue screen and when u select Repair, it takes u to a DOS like screen where you can start a Repair."

When you boot with a Windows CD that's the first time you can choose to Repair Windows - it's called the Recovery Console - but it's only of limited use and a little daunting for someone who hasn't used it before.

Some brand name software installations have the Recovery Console built into thesoftware on the hard drive and you can access it by pressing (a) key(s) while booting, but when Windows isn't working properly that often doesn't work either.

You type the number of the Windows installation found then Enter .

Then you see
.....Password:

This I found out about only by trial and error:

If there are no asterisks ("stars"; the uppercase of 8 on the keyboard) beside .....Password: there is no password, just type Enter.

If there ARE asterisks beside ....Password, the password is the same one as used as for Administrator in Safe mode in Windows, the case of letters is important, then press Enter.

type: help (press Enter) to see a list of commands.

type: help (name of command) (Enter) , or (name of command) /? (Enter) to see how to use it, etc.

The commands that have the same name as some of the ones you use in cmd mode in Windows work differently than they do in Windows cmd mode.

You can only access certain folders on the partition Windows is on - you get "access denied" for other folders. You can access CDs in optical drives and USB drives but not floppy drives.

type: exit
to exit the Recovery Console and reboot.
.....

There is a second Repair choice, if the existing Windows installation has certain data still intact.
This often fixes problems and it doesn't delete the present contentsof the partition Windowsison - it takes less than an hour to run - if it doesn't fix enough, then you need to install Windows or install the HP software from scratch.
How to do an XP Repair Setup, step by step:
http://www.windowsreinstall.com/win...

You will need a Windows CD of the same version as the one of your Windows installation, and the Product Key, preferably the one that was used to install it, but it can be one for the same version as the one of your Windows installation.
In most cases you get the Product Key from the official Microsoft sticker on your computer case, or from the official Microsoft sticker that came with your Windows CD if it has not been stuck to the case, or if you can't find that or don't have that, you can use a program to find the Product Key your Windows installation is presently using, BEFORE you run the Repair Setup (Repair install) - e.g. search for: keyfinder, by Jelly Bean whatever.


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