Solved No beep Codes, POST or input to monitor on computer startup

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June 6, 2015 at 15:20:15
Specs: Windows XP, 3.397 GHz / 2942 MB
No beep codes when I boot up my computer & no signal to monitor. No Post, absolutely nothing. At first I thought it was video card, bought a new one but that was not it. Then Replaced all the RAM, and still nothing. Then I tried to boot up my other PC and same thing so I removed the KVM, then bought a new monitor and still the same thing..... Can anyone help??

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✔ Best Answer
June 7, 2015 at 00:43:28
Yeah, fans and drives spinning up doesn't guarantee the PSU is good. The motherboard requires additional voltages to run properly.

Was the problem with the other two not a possibility with the third? Could someone else in the household have fiddled with them?



#1
June 6, 2015 at 15:46:38
So you have two computers that are dead as a dodo?

Could we have the makes and model numbers please? Are they both PC's (rather than laptops)?

PSU failure is high on the list of possibilities.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
June 6, 2015 at 15:47:29
Your problem is either with the board, CPU, or power supply. Did you make any changes just prior to the problem or is this a new build?

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#3
June 6, 2015 at 16:07:06
All PCs. One is a Velocity Micro bought in 2004 and the Other is a Forensic Work Station I built around 2002. Also tried another Velocity Micro from 2004. All died at the same time. And last i tried a Compaq from 2000 and it DID work, so it is not the monitor.

Made no changes. I was in the middle of using my main Velocity Micro when the screen froze. Thought at first the driver crashed and tried to reboot.


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Related Solutions

#4
June 6, 2015 at 16:07:47
the computers do power on but that is all.

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#5
June 6, 2015 at 16:10:14
unlikely - but... are all these PCs being plugged into the same main outlet; are you "sure" the power/mains outlet is OK - delivering correct mains volts?

Are you "sure" the power cord(s) are OK?

Very basic and not likely the cause here; but who knows...


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#6
June 6, 2015 at 16:12:29
Do the fans run?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#7
June 6, 2015 at 16:18:04
All plugged in to surge protector, fans run..... I do have 1 PC that works and 3 that do not. All 3 have exact same symptoms. they all power on but no Post, No beep codes, no input to monitor.
They all went bad at the same time. Could it be the battery on the MB?

message edited by Mal495


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#8
June 6, 2015 at 16:39:07
I can't imagine any common factor which would cause the same issue on three computers. Just unlucky I guess. Nor is there any certainty that each has the same fault.

Can you get into BIOS on any of them by tapping the appropriate key?

Not so sure that CMOS battery sounds very likely. However if they are the CR 2032 coin type then they are dirt cheap so I guess you could get a new one and try it in each computer.

Response #2 about says it all.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#9
June 6, 2015 at 17:50:29
OK, it turns out that after playing around with the other two computers, I got them to work, however, the one that I really need to work is still the same problem.

"No beep Codes, POST or input to monitor on computer startup"

so then, it doesn't appear to be the PSU since the PC powers up, so then it must be the CPU or mobo?? I guess I will order a new CPU then and see if that works.


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#10
June 6, 2015 at 19:06:47
"I guess I will order a new CPU then and see if that works"

Why would you buy a CPU? You're not even sure if it's the problem. You already bought a bunch of unnecessary stuff. You need to work on your troubleshooting skills.

Start by examining the board. Look for swollen or leaking capacitors. If you find either, the board is shot. Here's some examples: bulging caps, leaking caps

There's no easy way to test a power supply. Multimeters are only slightly helpful. They can confirm that voltages are within spec (or not) but not amperage. Just because a PSU is putting out enough power to spin a few fans doesn't necessarily mean it's putting out enough to power an entire system. Try connecting a "known to be good" PSU.

And try stripping the system down to the bare necessities & doing a benchtest: How to Bench Test, Build, and Troubleshoot Your Computer


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#11
June 6, 2015 at 20:35:56
My bet would be the power supply also. If you can pull the power supply on one of the working systems and try that, it would tell you a lot.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#12
June 7, 2015 at 00:43:28
✔ Best Answer
Yeah, fans and drives spinning up doesn't guarantee the PSU is good. The motherboard requires additional voltages to run properly.

Was the problem with the other two not a possibility with the third? Could someone else in the household have fiddled with them?


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#13
June 7, 2015 at 07:13:40
When testing any computer, unplug all the other computers from
the surge protector. If it works, plug the other computers back in
and see if the problem returns.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#14
June 7, 2015 at 08:46:01
Ruled out the CPU by swapping with another computer. Will trbl shoot the PSU some other time.

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#15
June 7, 2015 at 08:52:47
I wouldn't rule out the surge protecter either... Test systems without that in cct.

Has the surge protector ever been "hit"; as in actually handled a surge?

Some time back I recall reading a more trade type of article reviewing surge protectors.
It suggested that many at the domestic level are really one hit and you throw them away; and some of the cheaper types (aimed at the soho environment) much the same. One has to pay for real protection - which can handle more than one hit...


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#16
June 8, 2015 at 05:49:10
When powered and permitted to operate, the CPU then executes a BIOS program. This eventually discovers and tests each peripheral (including memory. But the CPU is not permitted to operate until a power controller enables it.

Power controller decides when the PSU can power on, takes in numerous inputs, and decides when the CPU can execute. IOW memory, CPU, etc will never operate until the power controller says so. Only way to see what the power system (PSU is only another component of that system) is doing is to use a digitl meter using some requestded instructions. The resulting numbers posted here then results in an answer that need not say "it could be" or "try this".

Those numbers are only way to obtain a useful answer from the fewer who actually know how computers work.


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#17
June 14, 2015 at 11:00:03
After playing around with the PC for a while, I managed to get it to POST with both HDs disconnected. Once I connected both HDs it went back to the same problem. Next I disconnected the slave because I remember having some problem with it years ago and no change. the I changed which power plug I was using for the Master and still no change. Last I removed both HDs again and still no change meaning it is back to the same problem.....

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#18
June 15, 2015 at 22:06:26
It could still be the power supply but another thing to check is the motherboard capacitors--the ones around the cpu especially as they seem the ones most likely to have problems. A bad one will often have a 'puffy' look like a soda can that's been in the freezer too long and the top is bulged out. Sometimes you'll see dried residue on the top indicating leakage. A motherboard that way will sometimes boot up and sometimes not.

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