New USB 2.0 pci card

February 27, 2011 at 06:50:12
Specs: Windows xp
Ive just purchased the above usb upgrade. I note with interst that theres an internal usb, i would like to connect this outlet into my existing front mounted USB outlet, is this possible? Im not really IT literate so if this is complicated then i guess i will go down the rouite of an external hub but i more than happy to use just the front mounted USB outlets?
Adjacent to the internal usb connection on the new card is a 4 pin male outlet what would this be for?

Kind regards

Ian


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#1
February 27, 2011 at 07:42:23
1st of all, why do you need the card? Is it because you have an old system that doesn't support USB 2.0? or because you need more USB ports? Are your front USB ports currently connected to the motherboard? As for how to hook it up & what the 4-pins are for, didn't you get a manual with the card?

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#2
February 27, 2011 at 08:37:00
The short answer....

You can connect the 4 pins on the PCI USB 2.0 card to ONE front port on the case, if it's the usual situation where each port is / was connected to the pins for one port on the mboard, if the wiring connector(s) coming from the front ports can be plugged into the pins such that the uses for the wires and the pins are compatible with each other.

If the wiring itself supports USB 2.0 use, the front port will work fine with devices that work better with ports that support USB 2.0 specs.
........

The details...

The typical two front case ports located lowest down on a tower desktop case are usually connected individually to the pins on a USB header on the mboard - each port connects to the pins for one port.
The typical pair of front USB ports (or an accessory plate that has 2 or 4 USB ports that installs in a slot space in the case) on a desktop case that connects to a header on the mboard for a pair of USB ports by using wiring that has
- situation 1 - an individual female connector for each wire, 4 or 5 wires for each port - the connectors usually have letters printed on them that are abbreviations of what they are for.
or
- situation 2 - a pair of 4 or 5 in a row female connectors - usually there are no letters printed on them.
or
- situation 3 - a single double row female connector, each row of wires being for one of the two ports - common on brand name system cases - usually there are no letters printed on them, and usually one pin hole is blocked so that it can fit on a USB header on the mboard only 1 way.
or
- situation 4 - an individual female connector for +5v and 1 or 2 ground wires or a ground wire and an overcurrent wire, a female 2 wire connector for +and - data, for each port

If a port has 5 wires for it, either it has
- 2 ground wires, one a ground for the port's power, the other a ground for the outer metal shell of the port
- or - a ground wire for the port's power and an overcurrent wire.

If a row of pins on one side of the double row header, or a single row header, on the mboard has 5 pins, either
- 2 pins are for ground
- or - 1 pin is for ground, another pin is for overcurrent

Which pin is for what on the USB headers on the mboard was never standardized, however,
- a particular mboard brand will usually have the same uses for the pins in the same order and pin arrangement on all their mboards
- as time has gone by, there are fewer mboards that use oddball pin arrangements on the USB headers, so newer mboards of different brands are more likely to have the same for the pins in the same order and pin arrangement on all their mboards.
- if you have a generic system with a retail mboard model, the manual for the specific mboard modelalmost always shows you which pins on the mboard USB header are for what use
-if you have a brand name system, the info about which pins on the USB header on the mboard are for what may or may not be in the support info on the brand name's web site for your specific model. E.g. that info is often there for Dell or HP or Compaq systems in info about the mboard. OR - sometimes, if the mboard is a mboard that is an OEM mboard that has a brand name bios version that is also sold retail with the maker's bios version or that the actual mboard maker has the info about the OEM mboard for, e.g. the mboard was made by Intel, you can consult the mboard manufacturer's manual for the model. OR, there are third party web sites for some brand name systems such as for emachines that know which mboard is in your brand name model and they have the USB header info

Which wire is for what in 4 or 5 in a row or in double row female wiring connectors from the case ports was never standardized, but as time has gone by, they are more likely to have the same order of the uses for the wires in the same places

Situation 1 wiring from the ports - individual female connectors - can connect to any USB header on the mboard.

Situation 2 wiring from the ports - 4 or 5 in a row female connectors - can only connect to USB headers that have pin arrangements and uses for the pins that are compatible with the female connector

Situation 3 wiring from the ports - a single double row female connector that usually has one blocked pin hole
- can only connect to a double row USB header that has uses for the pins and a pin arrangement that is compatible with it
- can connect to a less common single row USB header on one side of the double row connector only if the header has uses for the pins and a pin arrangement that is compatible with it

Situation 4 wiring from the ports - a paired connector for + and - data and individual connectors for everything else - will work with any USB header that has the two pins for data for the same port next to each other.
........

Your PCI USB 2.0 controller card and most PCI USB 2.0 cards, if they have pins for a port on the card, usually have a standard arrangement of uses for the 4 pins.
+5v on one end, then Data -, then Data +, then ground on the other end.
.......

The colors of the insulation of wires coming from the case ports (or coming from an accessory plate that has 2 or 4 USB ports that installs in a slot space in the case) varies, but usually
- the wire for +5v is red, the wire or two wires for ground or overcurrent is (are) black, the other 2 wires for data are two different colors, or the same color but one has an additional colored stripe -the striped wire is usual for data - .

Only 4 wires need to be connected for an individual USB port - for +5v, ground for the power, and two wires for + and -data.

If 5 wires are connected for a port,
- one of the wires / pins can be for either a second ground or for overcurrent.The intended uses for the wire / pin on both the USB port and the USB header must be the same.
- if both wires / pins are for ground, it doesn't matter which wire or pin for ground you use if you connect only 4 wires

- if the intended uses for the 5th wire / 5th pin on the header are not the same, you can't connect the 5th wire to a pin - your mboard bios will generate a message about overcurrent or similar even when nothing is plugged into the USB port
- if the wiring of a 4 or 5 in a row connector is otherwise compatible with the uses for the pins on a USB header, if the connector from the port has a 5 in a row connector and 5 wires, plug it into the 4 pins in a row on one side of a double row (or single row) USB header so the 5th wire does not connect to a pin; if the connector is 4 in a row / 4 wires, plug it into the 5 pins in a row side of a double row (or single row) USB header so there is no connection to the 5th pin
- if the wiring has a single double row connector,you can't plug it into adouble row USB header unless you can plug into only one side of the header, or unless you cut the 5th wire, or bend metal tabs flat inside the hole in the connector and release it's metal wire end from the double row connector.
.......

Plugging a compatible wiring connector or connectors from one of the case front ports (or from one port in a plate that has 2 or 4 USB ports that installs in a case slot space) will support USB 2.0 use IF AND ONLY IF the wiring between the port and the 4 pins on the PCI USB 2.0 controller card support the minimum requirements for USB 2.0 .
The minimum wire gauge (thickness; diameter; the lower the gauge number the thicker the wire) for USB 2.0 is higher than for USB 1.x, and preferably the wiring from the USB port should have braided wire shielding between the ends around the wires for each port.
If the wiring is not adequate for USB 2.0 use, you will get the nag message from Windows about the device you have plugged in would work better if you plugged it into a USB port that supports USB 2.0, when you plug in something that Windows "knows" would work better if the USB port supported USB 2.0, such as a flash drive, an external hard or optical drive, or an external memory card reader.


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#3
February 27, 2011 at 09:08:30
In answer to your questions:
a) im upgrading to 2.0
b) I have 4No USB outlets on the front of the case & 4No to the rear
c) I assume the USBs are connected to the Motherboard as they are working ok at present
d) There are simple instructions as to how to fix the new board but thats all, hence the enquiry

Regards

Ian


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Related Solutions

#4
February 27, 2011 at 09:44:19
The wiring connectors situation coming from the case, or from a port in a plate installed in a case slot space, can only be determined by you, unless you have a generic system with a brand name case (e.g. Thermaltake, Antec, Alien) or a brand name system with a brand name case not made for the brand name system builder (e.g. some Dell systems have an Alien case), that we can find that info for which is unlikely. See the info in response 2.
Other than that, a generic case or a brand name case other than one made for a brand name system builder may have a stuck on label inside of the case that details which USB wires are for what

The uses of the pins on the mboard for what use and in which order on the USB headers ....

See the part in response 2 starting at
"Which pin is for what on the USB headers on the mboard was never standardized, however, ..."

The uses of the pins on the PCI USB 2.0 card for what use and in which order on the USB header......

See the part in response 2 starting at
"Your PCI USB 2.0 controller card and most PCI USB 2.0 cards..."


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#5
February 27, 2011 at 10:03:42
First off thaks for your time however i think from what you have said with my limited knowledge i will be taking the upgrade (cars) back as to do this myself will end up in failure and i cant afford to be without my computer

Regards

Ian


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#6
February 27, 2011 at 10:09:56
You do not have to take the card back and there is nothing complicated about just installing the card and plugging devices into it that work better with ports that support USB 2.0 specs, such as a flash drive, an external hard or optical drive, or an external memory card reader, or a printer, or a multifunction printer / scanner / etc..

You won't get any nag messages from Windows when you plug a device into a USB 1.x port if Windows "knows" the device will work fine in a port that supports USB 1.x specs - e.g. a corded USB keyboard or a corded USB mouse.

If you don't want to have to plug the device that supports USB 2.0 use in the back, buy yourself one or more short USB extension cable(s) (type A, Male to Female) that support USB 2.0 specs and route the (Female) end of it to near the front of the case.
Don't use an external multiple port USB hub to do that if you want all possible devices plugged into a port in the hub to work. External USB hubs DO NOT work with all USB devices, even more so when you plug in more than one device into them.
........

Connecting wiring for a port to the wrong pins on a USB header will not harm the USB port or your mboard or the USB 2.0 card - the worst that can happen is the USB port just won't work. The wires being connected to the two pins for data backwards will probably still allow the USB port to work.

That said, some desktop mboards, e.g. Asus ones, have identical double row headers for one firewire port or two USB ports that have 9 pins on ten positions - make sure you do not connect the wiring for USB ports to the firewire header or visa versa - doing so will damage whatever you plug into the mis-wired port and the circuits for the header in a short time. The plastic at the base of the header for the two types of headers is usually two different colors. There is usually only one firewire header, more than one USB header.


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