Solved New SSD critical Temps

Custom / CUSTOM
June 13, 2019 at 12:56:16
Specs: Windows 10 Pro, X5670/12GB
Hi

I just bought a brand new ADATA SSD 120GB 650SU model. I put the SSD in and cloned my current drive to it. Afterwards I ran CrystalDiskInfo, HD Sentinal and ADATA's own SSD tool.

CrystalDiskInfo - Temp: 55-57c(red), Health: Good.

HD Sentinal - Temp: 56c-57c(red), Health: 100%, Performance: 100%

ADATA SSD Tool - Temp 56c-57c, Remaining Estimated Life: 35%, Data Written 18886TB

All utilities show Power on count as of writing this as 9 and total hours as 1 hour (like I said, its a new SSD)

Crystal Disk Mark benchmark is perfectly fine and even better than my previous LiteOn SSD that I was using.

So why are the Disk Utilities showing critical temps and ADATA's own tool showing 18800TB written and 35% remaining life. EDIT: In another two hours the total Data Written to Disk is now showing 20840TB

Other drives in the system are running below 43c and SSD is infront of the front fan and in a cool place away from everything.

Screenshots
https://ibb.co/Z1Rf7Lx
https://ibb.co/ZzCX5Vp
https://ibb.co/vJWRp8D


Should I be worried or is it just some bug in the firmware causing wrong reads of these values?

message edited by sysmed


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✔ Best Answer
June 13, 2019 at 15:40:40
In what type of computer is the drive installed; laptop or desktop?

Are you sure all cooling vents are clear and adequate air flow around the drive installation?

I have assorted Crucial SSD - 500Gi,. 1 and 2TB and all run pretty cool installed in external cases. I run Mac systems and boot from external SSD for reasons I won't digress into just now (not important or relevant to the current discussion). Even if left on for a day or two/thee they don't get more than" slightly" warm, if even that.

The specs for your SSD are here:

https://www.adata.com/us/specificat...

and indicate they operate up to 70C.

However I'd be inclined to return the drive, get a refund and go for a Crucial.

I have no connection with Crucial; but have used a range of their SSD over the last few years and been happy with them. Often a little cheaper to buy on Amazon at times than direct from Crucial.



#1
June 13, 2019 at 14:21:03
You didn't state if the readings were taken at idle or under load but since the temp is the same on all 3 programs, the reading can probably be trusted. The bytes written seems way out of whack though so I wouldn't put too much faith in the ADATA software.

From Hard Drive Geek: "You should be concerned about your SSD if it shows consistently high temperatures (over 50ºC/122ºF) while your machine is idle. If you aren’t running any file transfers or heavy I/O programs and you don’t live in the middle of a desert, but your SSD is still running over 50ºC – you might have a bigger problem."

https://harddrivegeek.com/ssd-tempe...


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#2
June 13, 2019 at 14:34:15
The readings were taking at idle. Only the disk utilities working. So you think I should go ahead and return the SSD under warranty and get a replacement?

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#3
June 13, 2019 at 14:35:21
Although the SSD is not Hot to the touch. The other drives showing lower temperatures are warmer

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#4
June 13, 2019 at 15:17:37
Update: Even when putting the drive on heavy load and benching it the temp remains unchanged. Only 1-2c difference.

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#5
June 13, 2019 at 15:40:40
✔ Best Answer
In what type of computer is the drive installed; laptop or desktop?

Are you sure all cooling vents are clear and adequate air flow around the drive installation?

I have assorted Crucial SSD - 500Gi,. 1 and 2TB and all run pretty cool installed in external cases. I run Mac systems and boot from external SSD for reasons I won't digress into just now (not important or relevant to the current discussion). Even if left on for a day or two/thee they don't get more than" slightly" warm, if even that.

The specs for your SSD are here:

https://www.adata.com/us/specificat...

and indicate they operate up to 70C.

However I'd be inclined to return the drive, get a refund and go for a Crucial.

I have no connection with Crucial; but have used a range of their SSD over the last few years and been happy with them. Often a little cheaper to buy on Amazon at times than direct from Crucial.


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#6
June 13, 2019 at 15:50:22
Its a Desktop system. A tower to be specific with a good airflow in the case. 2 x 140MM fans that are blowing on the drives. The SSD has nothing else running near it. There is a 120MM fan at the back of the case and not to forget the PSU fan. Other drives are running at 38c, 42c and 43c. The temp issue is only with this SSD.

Unfortunately I'm from Pakistan and the best I can get is the drive replaced. I won't be getting a refund for this. The company however will replace this if it thinks that there is something wrong with it. Warranty claim can be a hassle over here. The replacement will also take about a month.


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#7
June 13, 2019 at 16:38:53
mmm... see your dilemma...

I think I’d go for a replacement at least.

Before you return the drive, if possible of course, copy your personal data to another drive; or make an image of it so you can put that image on the new drive?

And I found this discussion which may be of interest:

https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/...

I did a google trawl/search using

adata ssd 120gb 650 running hot

and there are many hits about it,

Also, having cloned the drive (imaged it) perhaps wipe it and re-install an operating system on it; and check how the drive performs then in terms of temperature?

message edited by trvlr


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#8
June 13, 2019 at 16:51:16
I already have an image made as a back up. Sure, I'll try doing a fresh install and see if that makes a difference although i doubt it will. The utilities are reading the temps from somewhere on the drive and they would most probably continue to do so.

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#9
June 13, 2019 at 18:25:17
"2 x 140MM fans that are blowing on the drives. The SSD has nothing else running near it. There is a 120MM fan at the back of the case and not to forget the PSU fan"

Your fan config isn't entirely clear. I presume the two 140mm are front intake fans & the one 120mm is a rear exhaust fan? The PSU fan is only effective if it's mounted at the top of the case; bottom mounted PSUs have little or no effect on case cooling. It's generally recommended to have a slight negative pressure condition within the case. It appears you have a positive pressue condition so it's less than optimal. You should consider re-configuring your fans.

https://www.howtogeek.com/303078/ho...


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#10
June 14, 2019 at 07:08:05
Yes, you're right. Two intake fans at the front. One exhaust at the back and the PSU is mounted on the top of the case. It's an old case.

anyway, I got a response from ADATA on the email I sent them about the issue. They say that the drive is fine. According to them Their own ADATA SSDTools does not support the specific model I have and therefore the usage data is incorrect on there.

For the temps they said that they are well under operating temperatures and normal for the drive.

https://ibb.co/2Y95VZy
https://ibb.co/8r58ShL

message edited by sysmed


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#11
June 14, 2019 at 07:28:23
Thank you for your update.

i would pay heed/attention to the advice of riider re' fan situation and the creation of a slightly negative pressure within the case.


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#12
June 14, 2019 at 07:44:23
I'll look into the fans. Thank you everyone for your precious time. I really appreciate it.

So just for confirmation, should I send it back or keep it since ADATA says it's fine and they probably won't replace it if it falls under their normal temps.


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#13
June 16, 2019 at 06:01:59
If they say it is fine then returning it is a waste of your time. Having said that, make sure that you always have a current back up and drive image in case it does fail and you have to return it.

If your case does not have the space for a second exhaust fan (being an older case) then either get an exhaust fan with a much higher CFM rating for the back of the case. You can try unplugging one of the intake fans and see if overall you have improved your temps. If you have two or three drives in the case, see if you can space them out with room between them instead of stacked close together. I use one intake fan and two exhaust fans back and top back since bottom mounted power supply. Your top mounted one will help but the higher CFM may be enough to offset it. Also take the time to neaten up the case wiring so it does not restrict the air flow through the components.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#14
June 20, 2019 at 08:55:05
As per Fingers:

I'd certainly ensure that this drive has a frequent and safe backup (duplicate copies of contents); just in-case...

This of course is a policy, a practice to maintain regardless of whichever drive is involved etc....


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