New Power Supply & Video Card

Hewlett-packard / A6113w
August 22, 2009 at 04:21:53
Specs: Windows Vista
I purchased some upgrades for this computer below:

HP Pavilion a6113w Tower
Specifications
- Intel Pentium Dual Core E2140 @ 1.6 GHz
- 400 GB HDD
- 2 GB RAM
- DVD+\-RW
- Integrated Graphics
- Windows Vista Home Premium 32 Bit

which were a ATI Radeon HD 4850 Video Card and a Roswell 750w Power Supply. Worked great for the first 8 hours crashed for about 3 hours worked again for another 6 hours then crashed again and i cant get it to come back on. power supply is working for all i know and the video card hums on for a second when i try to reboot so i figure it is woking. i have even gone as far as to take out the video card just in case and still unresponsive. . Can anyone help?


See More: New Power Supply & Video Card

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#1
August 22, 2009 at 04:44:41
Try putting the old power supply back in to see if thats the problem. Unrelated to the problem but your cpu will bottleneck your video card when playing games.

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#2
August 22, 2009 at 04:48:58
so it could just be too much power...

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#3
August 22, 2009 at 04:53:12
it worked w/ the old power supply. does that mean my new one is bad?

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Related Solutions

#4
August 22, 2009 at 05:57:02
Yeah its probably faulty, take it back for a replacement.

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#5
August 22, 2009 at 07:31:26
can that stock power supply handle that video card?

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#6
August 22, 2009 at 07:36:56
Whats the wattage? Do you mean the 750 watt one? Yeah that will handle it easily

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#7
August 22, 2009 at 08:31:56
what about the 250w?


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#8
August 22, 2009 at 08:38:39
No, it needs to be at least 450.

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#9
August 22, 2009 at 09:12:48
what will happen if i was to use it?

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#10
August 22, 2009 at 09:19:35
Could pretty much fry your entire pc, dont do it.

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#11
August 22, 2009 at 09:42:13
"...and a Roswell 750w Power Supply"

It's Rosewill which is Newegg's "house brand". Rosewill doesn't manufacturer PSU's, they're a reseller. Is this the one you bought?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

You could have done a lot better for a lot less money. PSU's with multiple +12v rails should be avoided. Here's a better 650W unit for a lot less money:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

And here's some useful info about PSU's:

http://www.pcpower.com/technology/m...

"so it could just be too much power..."

No, that has nothing to do with it. You could have a 5000W PSU but if your system only requires 400W, that's all the PSU will produce. See the above link.

"what about the 250w?"

Not gonna get it done. If it works at all, it will become overloaded & possibly fry your new video card or worse. Does the old PSU even have the necessary plug(s) for the new card? Don't chance it...pull the new card until you get the PSU replaced.


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#12
August 22, 2009 at 14:39:52
what is multiple rail/ single rail? i am a newbie!!!

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#13
August 22, 2009 at 15:34:51
I'll try to keep this simple...a rail is the same as a circuit.

Some of the most important rails in a psu are +3.3v, +5v and +12v. The +12v rail is the most used in a modern computer and it's used a lot...by most everything. When power hungry processors (cpu's) appeared and video cards became more and more power hungry, psu manufacturers has two choices to meet the increased need of +12v power.

1. Build a psu with one very strong +12v circuit or
2. Build a psu with two or more normal +12v circuits.

In example 1., you just simply plug everything in and go about your business. In example 2., you would need to balance the +12v loads manually. Something like Motherboard/CPU on +12v_1, video card 1 on +12v_2, and video card 2 on +12v_3.

So example 1. has a single 12v rail and example 2. has
multiple 12v rails.

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#14
August 22, 2009 at 17:10:23
but you would think with this dispursement of power would be more power effiecent and would cause more centralized faults rather a massive power failure...

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#15
August 22, 2009 at 18:32:16
I gave a simple outline of single vs multiple rails. It gets more complicated...look at the label of your Rosewill psu.

You have 4 12v rails of 18a each. 4 x 18 = 72 right?

Wrong! 4 x 18 = 54

So, do you look at it like you have 4 18a rails or 4 13.5a rails or 3 18a rails or 2 9a and 2 18a or 1 12a, 1 6a, and 2 18a or ?

Confused? That's intentional...both by me and the psu manufacturers.

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