New mobo will not recognize any ISA card

Biostar M7vkq motherboard
August 11, 2010 at 17:34:10
Specs: Windows XP
Installed a new MB that has 1 ISA slot but the board will not recognize any ISA card I pit in it.

See More: New mobo will not recognize any ISA card

Report •

#1
August 11, 2010 at 17:48:54
XP doesn't recognize most ISA cards.

Report •

#2
August 11, 2010 at 17:52:41
That is because your motherboard doesn't have any ISA slots. ISA slots went out years ago. Your motherboard is old but its not that old. If you forced an ISA card into a PCI slot you may well have damaged something.

ISA slots were about the same length as a PCI slot and were coloured brown if I remember correctly. PCI slots are white.

http://www.biostar-usa.com/mbdetail...

Stuart


Report •

#3
August 11, 2010 at 17:59:47
Running win 98 and it works ok. It does have 3 PCI slots and 1 ISA. The card that I installed is an ISA card . However, it does not recognize board. Have tried more than 1 ISA board.
Thanks anyway

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
August 11, 2010 at 18:10:38
Some versions of the Biostar M7VKQ had an ISA slot. Here's an example:

http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?in...

But your problem has nothing to do with the board, it's the OS. You just said you had no problem with Win98. That's because 98 is an old OS that fully supports ISA. XP is limited in it's ISA support.

http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...


Report •

#5
August 11, 2010 at 20:07:34
Is your power supply harness missing the wire to pin 18? That supplies a -5 volts required by ISA slots. Some power supplies made for non-ISA motherboards don't include that wire.

If yours is that way, then that's the reason. However you mention the ISA slot worked OK with 98. Were you using the same power supply then?

Now that's what I call a sticky situation


Report •

#6
August 12, 2010 at 01:42:56
ISA cards were not made Plug and Play. You have to manually set the parameters and install the drivers.

Report •

#7
August 12, 2010 at 16:41:11
I know some claimed to be but even if the cards he's trying aren't PnP, an 'add hardware' search should find it.

Now that's what I call a sticky situation


Report •

#8
August 12, 2010 at 19:19:12
"Is your power supply harness missing the wire to pin 18? That supplies a -5 volts required by ISA slots. "

The ISA slot will still work if the (usually) white wire is not there at position 18 of a 20 pin standard ATX connector, or position 20 of a standard ATX 24 pin connector (if any mboards with a 24 pin connector socket have ISA slots). It carries only a small number of millamps of current.
It's for a rarely used feature of ISA slots / cards, that of course won't work if that wire is missing. Someone else who answered posts who had more knowledge than myself informed me of what the wire is for a long time ago on this site, but I can't find his info now, or even remember who it was, and I can't find any note about that on my computer I've used the whole time I've answered here.
......

"ISA cards were not made Plug and Play."

Some of the later ones were Plug n Play. e.g. I have an ISA PnP Soundblaster SB16 card, and some cards could be set to either PnP use, or jumpered or manually configured like older ISA cards.


Report •

#9
August 13, 2010 at 02:34:40
Since the card(s) weren't specified it is impossible to guess. I must have over 20 cards that can't be identified especially industrial type controllers.

Report •

#10
August 13, 2010 at 10:03:34
"I must have over 20 cards that can't be identified especially industrial type controllers."

Do any of them have FCC ID numbers on them?


Report •

#11
August 13, 2010 at 11:55:45
Yeah, I remember now some ISA modems that had a jumper to enable PnP. Also quite a few of the ISA sound cards were PnP.

Now that's what I call a sticky situation


Report •

#12
August 13, 2010 at 12:29:00
Even then it didn't always work. It was not for nothing that the expression Plug and Pray came into common usage.

Stuart


Report •

#13
August 14, 2010 at 08:50:00
Tubes - no FCC id's. Many are prototype or direct i/o type cards. Basically a buffered access to the bus.

Report •

Ask Question