Never Flash BIOS

Dell Inspiron mini netbook with intel at...
December 2, 2009 at 06:08:40
Specs: Any, Any
I would like to know if there is a way to set up a computer so that BIOS can never get flashed?

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#1
December 2, 2009 at 06:13:48
Many desktop motherboards have options in the BIOS that stop flashing. Others have jumpers that must be moved before a flash can be performed. That said, those safeguards can be circumvented. You can lock the case and install a BIOS password but even then someone could break in.

If you are referring to your netbook a BIOS password would be all that is needed. Be careful with BIOS/ Hard drive passwords. Losing them on a Laptop/notebook/netbook can keep you out too.


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#2
December 2, 2009 at 06:17:07
Some motherboards have a jumper that prevents the BIOS from being written to but that is a safety precaution more than anything else. It is a simple matter to remove it.

Other than that there is no way of preventing the BIOS from being flashed and why would you want to. If an error arises that a BIOS flash will solve or some new hardware comes out you are stuck if you cant flash the BIOS.

Stuart


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#3
December 2, 2009 at 09:39:52
There's nothing wrong with flashing the BIOS. Contrary to what many others say, I do it all the time. I consider it no different than updating drivers, except that if you do it wrong, you can trash your board. Your problem was that you stopped in the middle of the flash...you can NOT do that! Well, obviously you CAN, but you definitely should NOT. Wasn't there a warning on the screen that said something like "do not shutdown during BIOS update"?

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Related Solutions

#4
December 2, 2009 at 12:33:28
You would have to change the bios from an electrically erasable to a write once chip is all. There would be no other way.

You could test the bios by some other means to see if it has been altered on each boot.


I disagree slightly with jam on this. Normally I say only flash when the change states exactly a situation that you may need. For example to fix usb ports and you have trouble with usb. If your processor isn't supported a usb fix will not improve your situation so there would be no reason to attempt it.

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#5
December 2, 2009 at 13:54:19
I realize the general consensus is "don't do it unless absolutely necessary", but I've done it a countless number of times. I always go the old school route using a floppy, unless it absolutely has to be done differently. I don't like the idea of flashing from Windows. Unfortunately, far too many people don't have floppy drives anymore...to me, that is a huge mistake. And it's almost impossible to perform a flash using the wrong BIOS file...a warning message will pop indicating that the file isn't compatible. Same goes with the flash utility program...if it's the wrong one, it won't work. Not only that, but you have plenty of chances to back out when using the floppy method. You're prompted several times - "are you sure?" & "OK to program?". It requires user input several times during the procedure before it actually begins to run. But the one thing you should NOT do is try to stop it once it has begun, & judging from MonserrateM's other post, that is exactly what he did.

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#6
December 2, 2009 at 14:37:04
I agree jam. However, most times people flash just because a newer file is available without even knowing if there is any benefit in it for them.

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#7
December 2, 2009 at 18:34:28
I respect your viewpoint jam and it is as good as mine I guess. I'm not trying to use my "I insist" here.

I just see a lot of people who think bios flash fixes stuff that isn't related to the problem at hand.

It used to wreck boards. Lucky for us the new systems can boot to cd and fix most bios issues on some boards.

Kind of getting off topc.

Wonder why the OP asked that anyway?

Playing to the angels
Les Paul (1915-2009)


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#8
December 2, 2009 at 20:00:03
"Wonder why the OP asked that anyway?"

In his other post he stated that he accidentally started to flash the BIOS but right in the middle of it, he decided to shut the computer off...now it won't boot. I don't know how you can "accidentally" do it though.

Apparently he accidentally went to the board manufacturer's website, accidentally found the BIOS file, accidentally downloaded it, accidentally ran the BIOS flash program, then accidentally typed "Y" & accidentally clicked OK? The only thing he did on purpose was to shut down in the middle of the flash...lol


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#9
December 8, 2009 at 09:07:00
Thanks guys, and as for your answer of how I "accidentally did this," the only thing I accidentally did was start the BIOS flash. I purposely downloaded BIOS and did everything else :-), however the problem was that I asked a coworker what he though about flashing BIOS and he said you NEVER do that, and I kind of panicked and stopped the BIOS while it was like less than a minute in the process hoping that it did not do much damage, but my little knowledge of how BIOS did not kick in, and I rebooted the computer to see if it would function normally.

In other words, "I don't know what i was thinking."


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