Need help with installing AVG video card

February 12, 2010 at 04:30:53
Specs: Windows XP, 512mb
Recently i purchased an ATI RADEON 256MB PCI TV DVI AVG video card for my pc which came in today, i managed to fit the video card and insert the monitor cable behind the video card, HOWEVER when i turned on my computer nothing came up on the monitor, why is this? It just said no signal

Secondly the VGA manual reads:

" Turn the computer's power off but make sure the system is still grounded (leave the power cord connected. Then disconnect the monitor signal cable"

What does this mean, do i switch off the power for everything or do i just leave the power cable on but switch off my computer, if i do that when i open up my pc there is a yellow light...

Here are the specs for my pc

PentiumR (4) CPU 2.80GHZ
2.79GHz, 504MB of RAM
Operating system Microsoft Windows 2000 xp
Home edition, 2002, service pack 3

Thank you

O and at the beginning it reads 'Please first configure your operating system to use a standard VGA driver before installing the VGA card.

By the way, this computer never had a video card installed on it before


Someone i know replied

--------------------------------------

"If you had no video card before, I am assuming you had on board video.

You might want to check your BIOS settings. It's probably set up to use the on board video. You probably have to disable that in order to get a 3rd party card to work.

When you check your BIOS, it's probably going to be something called "integrated video" or something.

You will need to disable it, or play with the settings to allow your new card to be the primary source of video on your PC."

-------------------------------------------

How do i access the bio settings????


See More: Need help with installing AVG video card

Report •

#1
February 12, 2010 at 05:42:07
Anyway, i got some useful information and was able to access some video information

here it is;

Bios Version = A02 (01/10/05)

_Onboard Devices_

Integrated NIC
Integrated Audio

_Video_

Primary video

Auto = Use the add-in video controller
Onboard = Use the integrated video controller

^^

Which one shall i select? Currently its on Auto, maybe i have to do it manual????

Thanks in Advance


Report •

#2
February 12, 2010 at 06:45:33
I'm curious why you bought a PCI card...is that the only slot type you have available? And which card did you buy? There are dozens of Radeon cards.

I understand that the instructions recommend leaving the power cord plugged in to maintain the ground, but not all power supplies have an on/off switch. And if there's no switch, there's power going to the motherboard even if the system is shutdown. I recommend that you unplug the power cord any time you work inside the case.

Depending on what type of system you have, the key used to enter the BIOS & the settings within the BIOS will vary. If the system is custom built, the key will most likely be DEL. But if you have an OEM system (Dell, Gateway, HP/Compaq, etc), it's probably one of the "F" keys...F1, F2, F10. There's usually a brief message that will come up on the screen when you 1st bootup, for example, "press F2 to enter setup". That will open the BIOS menu. Once you're in, you will have to use the arrow keys to navigate. But like I said, the BIOS settings vary from system to system. If you post either the make/model of your motherboard or make/model of your system, one of us should be able to be more specific about which settings to look for.

"Which one shall i select? Currently its on Auto, maybe i have to do it manual????"

Read what it says. AUTO = use the add-in video. You're ADDing a video card, right? Onboard = use the integrated video. You don't want to use the onboard video anymore, right?


Report •

#3
February 12, 2010 at 10:35:55
- ATI Radeon 9200 256 MB PCI 3D Video Card TV-Out VGA DVI

I have 2 pci bus slots and another pci - e slot.

I just bought a 256mb for now, i just wanted to learn stuff, try, test, etc untill i bought a proper gaming pc, this card will run basic games untill i buy a better pc....

By the way, im able to insert the card but its still a bit shaky, is that supposed to happen?

Thanks


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
February 12, 2010 at 11:20:41
If you have a PCI-e slot, why would get a standard PCI card? Especially one with technology that's almost 7 yrs old? I sure hope you didn't pay much.

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...

"im able to insert the card but its still a bit shaky, is that supposed to happen?"

Did you screw it in place?


Report •

#5
February 12, 2010 at 11:59:19
like i said jam i just wanted a basic 256mb card to run basic games like

rise of nations
cossacks
freelancer
soldier front

Untill i get a new pc XD

No screw came in with the card or the computer

I have a dell dimension 5000, maybe like you hinted i need a screw XD

Thanks for your help anyway


Report •

#6
February 12, 2010 at 12:30:26
"ATI RADEON 256MB PCI TV DVI AVG "

should be

ATI RADEON 256MB PCI TV DVI VGA

"'Please first configure your operating system to use a standard VGA driver before installing the VGA card."

You're supposed to Un-install any specific drivers / software that have been loaded for the onboard video adapter, if that applies (if you don't want to use the onboard video even if it is NOT auto disabled by installing a PCI video card in a slot), or for a card in a slot you were using previously, if that applies, that are listed in Control Panel - Add/Remove Programs, BEFORE you install the card in a slot, because the already installed drivers MAY clash with what your video card video chipset requires, even before you have installed the specific drivers / software for the video adapter. Un-installing that software sets Windows to use default VGA video settings ((Display adapter drivers ) of one sort or another, after you reboot. If Windows has the video (Display Adapter(s) ) set to a default VGA mode, the specific drivers / software for the video card will install properly.
NOTE that sometimes Windows has auto installed built into XP video drivers / software - in that case, there are often no listings for it in Add/Remove Programs.
In that case, or after you have un-installed existing video drivers listed there, after you reboot, go to Device Manager and take a look.
E.g. RIGHT click on My Computer - Properties - Hardware - Device Manager.
Open up the Display adapters listing.
If there is any device listed that is NOT some sort of default VGA device listed there, RIGHT click on it, choose Un-install, but if you do that DO NOT Reboot at that point. Then you install the specific drivers / software for the video card. THEN you can reboot.

"By the way, this computer never had a video card installed on it before"

"Primary video

Auto = Use the add-in video controller
Onboard = Use the integrated video controller"

Your mboard does have an onboard video adapter - I assume you were using it previously.

"...im able to insert the card but its still a bit shaky, is that supposed to happen?..."

You must install a screw at the metal bracket end of it that secures the top of the bracket to the case. You should never forget to do that, because simply plugging in the video cable from the monitor into the card when the card is not secured there can easily move the card upwards in the slot, and that happening can easily FRY the card's circuits when the computer has AC power to the PS and is booted.
The card must be all the way down in it's slot BEFORE the computer has AC power to the PS and is booted, at ALL times.

When you install a PCI video card in a slot, it may or may not automatically disable the onboard video - the video adapter built into the mboard - if the mboard has that, depending on the particular mboard and it's bios version.
If the onboard video IS auto disabled, the settings in the bios settings regarding sharing ram with the onboard video are ignored by the bios, Windows can use then use all of the ram installed in the mboard, and a monitor plugged into the port on the onboard video does not produce a display, when the video card has been installed. You go into the bios Setup and make sure Primary Video or Intialize Video First or similar is set to PCI, not onboard video or similar. Auto may or may not be okay. I your case for your particular bios Auto appears to be the one you should set that to.
We had aTopic here not long ago where a newbie had installed a video card in a slot and still had his monitor plugged into the port for onboard video - the onboard video was auto disabled on that mboard when he installed the card in the slot - of course he had no video on the monitor in that case.
You must plug in the monitor's video cable into a port on the card in a slot - if you leave it plugged into a port for onboard video you will get no video from the monitor if the onboard video was auto disabled, or if settings in the bios have disabled it (that's NOT common).
If the onboard video was NOT auto disabled by installing the PCI card, both the onboard video port and a port on the card will produce a display when you plug in a monitor. In that case the Primary video or similar setting being set to PCI in the bios (Auto in your case) usually still does NOT disable the onboard video - if that's your case, you are merely allowing Windows to use the card's video adapter as the Primary video device when you set that.
...........

"I have 2 pci bus slots and another pci - e slot."

If it's a PCIE X16 slot, or a PCI-E X8 slot, you can buy a much better PCI-E X16 video card starting at a cheap price, often for less than that for a video card with the same video chipset as the PCI card version.
Even if it's only a PCI-E X1 slot, you can buy a much better PCI-E X1 video card starting at a cheap price, often for less than that for a video card with the same video chipset as the PCI card version, although there's fewer available choices out there.

"I just bought a 256mb for now"

The amount of video ram - video memory - on the video card, after a certain minimal amount that 256mb exceeds for this video chipset and most video chipsets, has little or nothing to do with how well the video card performs, other than more ram allows you to use higher resolutions that are supported by the video chipset at faster frame rates (fast moving video looks better). A card with less video ram has exactly the same max video frame rates for lower resolutions as a card with more ram does, when the video chipset is exactly the same, and any possible overclocking specs are the same.

If you don't have a large monitor (or a large LCD or Plasma TV with a VGA or DVI inputs) that can use the higher resolutions, more ram won't do you any good, because things will be too tiny on the screen at the highest resolutions - you won't be to be able to see everything properly.
256mb may be the highest amount you can get on a card for the 9200 video chipset.



Report •

#7
February 12, 2010 at 12:42:06
I'd be willing to bet a few pictures of cookies that your GMA900 is faster than the Radeon 9200...especially the PCI version.

Cheap PCI-E cards are cheap...lol. If you can, return the PCI card and buy a $24 GeForce 6600GT.

Super PIII - Still Tickin' | New unlocked ES P-III @ 1.8GHz (150x12, 1.65v) | Apollo Pro 266T | 2GB PC2700 | HIS x1950Pro | Swan M10 speakers | 500GB | Win7 Pro


Report •

#8
February 12, 2010 at 13:07:03
"No screw came in with the card or the computer"

You MUST install a screw to hold down the card on the bracket end. Miserly of Dell to not have the screws there.
However, sometimes there are extra screws inside the Dell case that aren't being used for anything, elsewhere, that are meant for that use. Take a look around inside the case.
Even if you don't see that....
- there are only two possible screw shaft sizes and threading (coarser or finer) for what the already threaded screw hole requires.
CD and DVD drives and floppy drives use screws with the smaller shaft size, finer threading.
Hard drives use screws with the larger shaft size, coarser threading.
If a CD or DVD drive, or a hard drive, has more than one fastening screw on each side, remove one and try it in the hole - if one for a hard drive won't thread into the hole, it has to be that one for a CD or DVD drive will work.

If there are no spare screws, any place that repairs computers has lots of them and will give some to you free.
........

NOTE:
The video cables for monitors are NOT "hot pluggable" ! !
Do NOT unplug or plug in a monitor's video cable while the computer is running, otherwise you can damage the video port circuits, and/or the monitor's circuits. It's also a good idea to switch off the monitor AC power when you plug it in / unplug it.

Same applies to PS/2 cable or adapter connections, serial cable connections, parallel port connections, legacy joystick port connections.
........

If those games are recent, your 9200 card may not be good enough. It may only properly support DirectX 8 use.
The card will still work, but it won't be able to support the fancier features DirectX 9 or 10 allows for (XP can't support DirectX 10 anyway).
I have a Radeon 2400 PCI card that according to user reviews works well for recent games - it meets or exceeds the minimum requirements for most recent games, and it properly supports DirectX 9 use in XP, and Direct X10 use in Vista and Windows 7.


Report •

#9
February 12, 2010 at 13:26:30
"dell dimension 5000"
specs
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dell_D...

You probably have a PCI-E x16 slot (long) and/or at least one PCI-E X1 slot (short) available !

As I said above -

""I have 2 pci bus slots and another pci - e slot.""

"If it's a PCIE X16 slot, or a PCI-E X8 slot, you can buy a much better PCI-E X16 video card starting at a cheap price, often for less than that for a video card with the same video chipset as the PCI card version.
Even if it's only a PCI-E X1 slot, you can buy a much better PCI-E X1 video card starting at a cheap price, often for less than that for a video card with the same video chipset as the PCI card version, although there's fewer available choices out there."


E.g. a Radeon 2400 PCI-E X16 or PCI-E X1 card !


Report •

#10
February 12, 2010 at 13:36:23
"i just wanted a basic 256mb card to run basic games"

After looking at the list of old games, I doubt you'll have any problems. I don't know what you paid for the card...$5-10 from a friend or $30-40 (or more) brand new? If you paid more than $10, you would have been much better off getting a low end PCI-e card. You can get a Radeon HD4350 or Geforce 8400GS for about $20 after rebate. Newegg runs deals on them all the time. And I just saw the 6600GT for $25 that jackbomb mentioned.


Report •

#11
February 12, 2010 at 14:03:56
Dimension 5000 service manual
http://support.dell.com/support/edo...

There may be info about where extra screws are in that.

You have a 305 watt max capacity power supply, if it's the orginal one.

Your Radeon 9200 wil be okay with that, but if you get a better video card, you may need to replace the power supply with one with more capacity.

Your power supply must have at least the minumum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD!)
If that info is not in the ad for the video card, you can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. Some power supplies have two or more +12v ratings - in that case, add those ratings to determine the total +12v current capacity.

If you play games a lot.....
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittant rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.

I checked - your power supply is the standard physical size.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...


Report •

#12
February 12, 2010 at 16:30:47
Thanks guys

just came back, will sleep for now just scanned through all the comments, tommorow i will wake up and read every single post properly, just tired for now

Well i probably got conned because i paid £24 for this card... anyway

All i need s to buy a screw and configure some settings, etc

Thanks

If i have any other problems or questions i'll just bump this thread

Really appreciate all your help guys because it helped me a lot.


Report •

#13
February 12, 2010 at 20:14:14
"i probably got conned because i paid £24 for this card..."

£24 is approx $37.50 US. It's not as much a rip off as it was an extremely poor choice.

http://www.misco.co.uk/applications...


Report •

#14
February 13, 2010 at 11:52:27
"You're supposed to Un-install any specific drivers / software that have been loaded for the onboard video adapter, if that applies (if you don't want to use the onboard video even if it is NOT auto disabled by installing a PCI video card in a slot), or for a card in a slot you were using previously, if that applies, that are listed in Control Panel - Add/Remove Programs, BEFORE you install the card in a slot, because the already installed drivers MAY clash with what your video card video chipset requires, even before you have installed the specific drivers / software for the video adapter. Un-installing that software sets Windows to use default VGA video settings ((Display adapter drivers ) of one sort or another, after you reboot. If Windows has the video (Display Adapter(s) ) set to a default VGA mode, the specific drivers / software for the video card will install properly."

I accessed add/remove programs so where do i go next? Or what do i do or am supposed to find? Anything specific?

Thank you in advance.

I have ATI catalyst installed, would that help me???


Report •

#15
February 13, 2010 at 12:02:43
By the way, i found this step by step instructions useful but i need a bit of help here

---------------------------

# Locate the My Computer icon
# Right-click the My Computer icon, and select Properties
# If you are in Windows 95, 98, or ME, select the Device Manager tab.
# If you are using Windows NT, 2000, or XP, select the Hardware tab, then select the Device Manager button
# Double-click the menu item labeled Display adapters. Your current display adapter will appear immediately below as a separate menu item.
# Right-click the display adapter text that has just appeared. A menu with several options will appear.
# Select Remove or Uninstall from this menu. Figure 3 shows the Device Manager with the Uninstall option highlighted in Windows XP.

------------------------------------

Basically i dont have a section which reads ' Display Adapters'... Instead i have

Edit:

O woooow, i right clicked Video controller (VGA), i went on update and it was on the verge of installing but it said problems occured, HOWEVER, i now have the 'Display Adapters' section, what should i do now??? Continue with the instructions?


Report •

#16
February 13, 2010 at 12:05:14
wow i had a chpset video card in this computer which is 128mb, half of the video card i bought, now i will test to see if i can run some games but this chipset is the onbaord card i guess?

Intel(R) 82915G/GV/910GL Express Chipset Family


Report •

#17
February 13, 2010 at 12:21:03
omg i can play games now, by lukc and the website i actvated a video card that was lost in this pc for years

OMG LOOOL

128mb

i wasted 24 bucks on a 256mb card, anyway, l8r i may install that but just lol


Report •

#18
February 13, 2010 at 17:33:00
"I accessed add/remove programs so where do i go next? Or what do i do or am supposed to find? Anything specific?'

You have Intel onboard graphics drivers - Un-install anything listed for those. There may be two or more Intel listings - don't un-install Intel xxxx it if it doesn't say graphics or simlar on the line.

"I have ATI catalyst installed, would that help me???"

The mboard does not come with any ATI software.
I didn't tell you to install anything for the PCI card yet !
Un-install them, if you have not un-installed the Intel graphics drivers listings, andthe ATI graphics drivers if listed !!

"Basically i dont have a section which reads ' Display Adapters'... "

That indicates something was buggered up. It should always be there.

If you were using the onboard video before - you have NOT told us whether you were - Windows loads default display drivers even if the Display adapter category isn't appearing there, so you still have video in Windows.

"O woooow, i right clicked Video controller (VGA), i went on update and it was on the verge of installing but it said problems occured, HOWEVER, i now have the 'Display Adapters' section, what should i do now??? Continue with the instructions? "

I didn't tell you to RIGHT click on VGA whatever ! - I told to right click on it if it was NOT VGA whatever.
I didn't tell you click to Update either !
When you try to update the VGA driver, it just loads it from what's built into XP - when you did that, somehow the missing Display adapter category appeared.

You load drivers and software for the PCI card, but you don't do that there, because they will probably not load properly there.

"wow i had a chpset video card in this computer which is 128mb, half of the video card i bought, now i will test to see if i can run some games but this chipset is the onbaord card i guess?

Intel(R) 82915G/GV/910GL Express Chipset Family "

The term CARD is frequently mis-used !

That's the onboard video - it's a video or graphics or display adapter but IT IS NOT A CARD !
It's a CARD ONLY if it installs in a slot in the mboard and it's removable !
Same goes for onboard sound, onboard network adapter, etc.

Some adapter (e.g. for sound) that plugs into a USB port is IS NOT A CARD either !

Installing a video card in a slot is always better than using onboard video, for at least how well the ram installed in the mboard can perform, because onboard video shares the ram installed in the mboard, and sharing that ram greatly reduces the max bandwidth - max data transfer rate - of the ram - it's as little as half what it would be if it wasn't sharing the ram .

If you install a video card in a slot and it auto disables the onboard video automatically when you do that - it almost always does when the card is AGP or PCI-E X16, it may or may not do that when the card is PCI, I don't know if a PCI-E X1 card would do that - then the ram is no longer shared with the onboard video, and the ram in the mboard is then able to achieve it's full max bandwidth - max data transfer rate. You see the difference most when you use a program that benefits from the greater bandwidth - e.g. games, programs with fast video. Plus - you also gain the ram the video was using, for use with Windows.

Did you un-install the Intel(R) 82915G/GV/910GL Express Chipset Family or similar graphics drivers drivers / software yet in Control Panel - Add/ Remove Programs?

If you haven't done that, do that.

While you're there...

If you see ATI Catalyst.... or similar, and or
ATI.... graphcs divers or similar - you should not have installed those yet !
Un-install them too !
If there is an ATI software removal or similar listing, click on that - it will install a bunch of ATI stuff.

Then, after re-booting,

DO NOT install the drivers for the PCI card while booting the computer ! CANCEL that !
Continue on to the desktop.

Go look in Add/Remove Programs again.
If there is any ATI something still there, un-install that too.

If you did that....Then, after re-booting,

DO NOT install the drivers for the PCI card while booting the computer ! CANCEL that !
Continue on to the desktop.

Go to Device Manager

Are you seeing BOTH
Intel(R) 82915G/GV/910GL Express Chipset Family
and
VGA something
listed under Display adapters in Device Manager,
or just
VGA something ?

If you see ONLY VGA something, that's the PCI card, and the onboard video is disabled.
(if the card has two ports, there may be two VGA somethings)

In that case, exit Device Manager.

Install the software for the PCI card from the CD that came with it.
.......

jam said previously your PCI Radeon 9200 card may not be as good as the onboard video, which apparantly is PCI-E, but not sharing the mboard ram with the onboard video may yield you better video anyway, especially for games and fast moving video that benefits from greater ram bandwidth. .
.........

The PCI card has 256mb of it's own ram - it does not share any of the mboard's ram.
You can't compare the amount of ram shared with onboard video to that on a card directly, because that's two different situations.
The only significance that has if some game's or whatever minimum requirements says xxx of video ram required, with either way, you must have that much ram on the card or that much shared with the mboard ram for onboard video, or more.


Report •

#19
February 14, 2010 at 02:33:32
Ok bro, thanks...

I will try whenever i can and after i'll set you feedback.

Its actually better i clicked update because the onboard video is displayed and now i can run the proper instructions you and the website set me.

Like you said i'll uninstall everything, re-boot (restart) the computer then uninstall the catalyst software which i installed months ago, after i'll add in the card into the pci bus slot, insert the montors cable into the an available slot behind the new video card, open up the pc, insert the cd, install the software, drivers and enjoy low quality gaming? XD


Report •

#20
February 14, 2010 at 07:12:49
"Its actually better i clicked update because the onboard video is displayed ..."

If you had not un-installed the drivers / software for the onboard video - Intel(R) 82915G/GV/910GL Express Chipset Family - yet, then you may not actually have onboard video - what you see in Device Manager may only indicate that the drivers / software for the onboard video is installed.
Installing a PCI video card may or may not disable the onboard video. On many mboards, it does not.
If you connect the monitor to the onboard video port when the PCI card is installed in aslot, and the video still works from that, then, yes, the onboard video is still enabled when you have the PCI card in the slot.
I'm assuming you did change the Primary video setting in the bios to Auto as suggested, saved settings.

"...uninstall the catalyst software which i installed months ago.."

Huh?
I was assuming you installed that from the CD for the PCI card, probably along with display drivers / software.
Have you had the PCI card for that long, or do you, or did you, have some other device that by default wanted ATI's Catalyst to be installed - e.g. an ATI TV Tuner card or one that uses ATI chips.


Report •

#21
February 14, 2010 at 08:39:31
Bro, im sorry that i am a newbie, a few months ago i thought that installing ATI catalyst will let me run games, then i did a bit of research and learnt how to upgrade a pc in terms of video card, ram etc. So i guess im still a newbie XD

Thanks for all your help, i'll keep in contact


Report •

#22
February 14, 2010 at 09:06:42
Catayst can only be used by ATI (or AMD) video related chips (AMD merged with ATI a few years ago; some models of ATI chips were renamed with AMD labeling and corresonding model numbers).
You don't necessarily have to install Catalyst, but it's included with the default installation of software for devices that use ATI (or AMD) video related chips. It's useful when you have more than one monitor or display, but some think it's bloatware, and it requires a certain version of Microsoft .Net Framework to be installed to support it and that in itself is huge.
You can use the equivalent of what ATI used to use instead of Catalyst - a Control Panel - to do most if not all of the things Catalyst can do - that does not require any .Net Framework version to be installed to support it.
Or - you can choose to not install Catalyst, and to not install the certain version of Microsoft .Net Framework it requires if nothing else requires it to be installed.

Catalyst, or a Control Panel equivalent, is/are not required in order to get the best video performance from ATI (or AMD) video related chips - there isn't much if anything in them that has an effect on video performance . You can do that elsewhere in the operating system once the specific graphics drivers have been installed.


Report •

#23
February 16, 2010 at 09:48:26
Ok thank you

I actually need help concerning a screw i need to place and hold the video card firmly, without it being shakey. I dont know which type of screw i need and where to buy one from? I've got an old pc, maybe i can find a screw inside it but what type?

Regards


Report •

#24
February 16, 2010 at 13:46:00
I've already told you about that.
See Response 8 and the begining of Response 11

Report •

#25
February 17, 2010 at 03:07:53
Ok thank you, should be checking today.

Report •

#26
February 17, 2010 at 03:26:26
By the way TubesandWires

I forgot to tell you that my Dell Dimension 2000 pc has got a latch or something like that to hold the video card in position but the card still seems shakey, so do i need a screw because even though its a BIT shakey i wouldnt imagine it falling off as the Latch is holding it, copy and paste this link and you wqill see an image of how many pc looks inside, the latch bit or whatever im talking about is located at the bottom right hand corner area.

http://img.tomshardware.com/de/2006...


Report •

#27
February 17, 2010 at 07:18:59
"...my Dell Dimension 2000 ..."

You said you have a Dimension 5000 !

I can't see enough detail in that picture you supplied.

See the link to the manual at the beginning of Response 11.

Under Cards it show the details. It shows a screw at each card bracket, but it doesn't mention installing one.

If the "latch" prevents the card from moving updwards in it's slot, it doesn't matter much if the card can move a bit from side to side at the top, but I would install a screw anyway.


Report •

#28
February 17, 2010 at 10:28:45
ah man i am very sorry, i keep on mixing dell dimension 5000 to 2000

In correction i have a Dell Dimension 5000

Thank you for the information

I'll get back to you when i have a question to ask, you've really helped me a lot...


Report •

Ask Question