Need help using new SATA burner on older sys

Micro-star international / Ms-7142
January 20, 2011 at 16:06:48
Specs: Windows XP, 1.799 GHz / 2047 MB
I have a sata dvd burner: Gear Head 24XDVDINTLS and a VIA MS-7142 motherboard. The burner is the only thing i have that is SATA. I'm not sure what Sata port i should have it plugged into. I'm not sure what sata mode i should be using in the bios: IDE or raid. I have XP pro sp2 and can't get the burner running right. It won't detect the burner. With a restart, the OS takes forever to load and the Hard drive light stay on for a long time, then XP finally comes up. bios ver: 1.0A
running 32 bit xp pro sp2
AMD Athlon 64 Processor 2800+, 2 gb ram
Manufacturer: Micro-star international co., ltd
Model: Ms-7142
OS: XP PRO sp2
CPU/Ram: 1.799 GHz / 2047 MB
Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce 6600
Sound Card: USB Audio Device USB Audio Device Vinyl AC'97 Codec Combo Driver (WDM)

See More: Need help using new SATA burner on older sys

Report •


#1
January 20, 2011 at 16:33:24
You need to install SATA driver to use a SATA drive with Windows XP. The CD that came with the drive should have them Otherwise they should be a setting in the BIOS set the SATA drive to comparability mode.

Stuart


Report •

#2
January 20, 2011 at 17:39:01
The drive only came with a disc with nero express on it. And the only option in my bios is sata mode: ide or raid

Report •

#3
January 20, 2011 at 19:33:19
I have installed SATA drives, both hard drives and optical drives on XP and never had to install drivers using XP Pro SP2.

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 20, 2011 at 19:36:12
I forgot to post an answer to the questions! It doesn't make any difference which SATA port unless it is your boot hard drive. Then it should go on SATA 1. And you should have the BIOS set to IDE abd SATA needs to be enabled also.

Report •

#5
January 20, 2011 at 21:05:13
Whether you need to install SATA drivers for the mboard's SATA drive controllers depends on what mode the bios has the SATA drive controllers in.
The SATA controllers can be either in a SATA mode or in an IDE compatible mode of some sort in the bios.
(It doesn't necessarily say "SATA controller mode" in the bios, but in the bioses of all but the oldest mboards that have SATA drive controllers built in, there is somewhere where you can change the setting SATA (or AHCI) to an IDE compatible mode of some sort, or visa versa.)
I have noticed that many new and more recent older mboard bioses for desktop mboards come set by default such that the SATA controllers are in an IDE compatible mode, and in that case any SATA drive will be detected, as an IDE compatible drive, in the operating system, and by the files initially loaded when you install XP by booting from it's regular CD.
If the bios has the SATA controllers set to a SATA mode, then you must install the SATA controller drivers in order for SATA drives to be recognized in the operating system, and when you're installing XP by booting from it's regular CD, you must press F6 very early when the initial filesare loading and supply SATA controller drivers on a floppy disk in a legacy floppy drive (only a small number of USB floppy drive models are recognized, ones that were available when XP was first released; the files initially loaded by the XP or 2000 CD will not recognize driver files on any other source).
OR - you can make yourself a "slipstreamed" XP CD that has the SATA controller drivers needed for the mboard integrated into it. While you're doing that, if the CD does not have SP3 updates, you might as well integrate SP3 updates into it as well. You use the "slipstreamed" CD along with the original Product key rather than the original XP CD.

Report •

#6
January 21, 2011 at 07:59:27
I have installed SATA drives, both hard drives and optical drives on XP and never had to install drivers using XP Pro SP2.

It depends on what type of XP Disk you have. Many OEM version of XP will come with SATA drivers built in, put there by the OEM for issued with a computer with SATA drives installed as standard. Slipstreamed as explained by Tubesandwires.

Older OEM disks or retail versions of XP will not have these SATA drivers.

Stuart


Report •

#7
January 21, 2011 at 10:23:23
There are two "categories" of OEM Windows disks

- those that are regular Microsoft OEM disks that can be used with any computer (For Distribution with a new PC only." is printed on the surface of the Microsoft disk; the disk has holograms on it; no brand on it other than Microsoft) - you can buy those on the web, or often from local usually smaller places that build custom computer systems and/or have lots of computer parts and computer software ("big box" stores and department stores usually have only the full retail versions and the retail upgrade versions).
Sometimes smaller custom brand name system builders provide those CDs with their own custom label - I've found it can be used with any computer too.

- and - those that come with a major brand name computer when it was new (e.g., Dell, HP, Compaq), or are a Recovery disk or a disk in the Recovery disk set that can be made by the user by using a brand name supplied program already on the computer, or can be obtained for the specific model if the computer didn't come with disks (e.g. Emachines systems don't come with disks, but they can usually be obtained from their web site). Those probably have a few files that have been custom modified (or on or more unique other files? ) that check the system such that the disk cannot be used (to install Windows from scratch, at least) with a system that is detected to not have the intended brand name's bios version, and possibly also is detected to not have one of a few acceptable mboard models.

I have examined two (OEM) Dell XP Re-installation CDs that came with the computer when it was new.
The files that are on the Dell CD are identical to the same files on a regular Microsoft OEM XP CD of the same version (For Distribution with a new PC only." is printed on the Microsoft CD) , Home or Pro, that have the same SP updates (or no SP updates) integrated into them, except that there are are a few OEM.* files that have different content on the Dell CD.
(I compared the files on the (OEM) Dell CD to the ones on the OEM Microsoft CD using FC [File Compare] in cmd mode. ) There were NO additional drivers of ANY description on the Dell CDs. However, the Dell models did not have have a SATA controller.

I also examined an XP Home SP2 re-installation CD that came with a HP Pavilion laptop a friend of mine had - it does not have a SATA controller - same things found as for the Dell XP re-installation CDs, except the OEM.* files had different internal content.
That HP Pavilion laptop model also came with a Drivers and Applications or similar DVD. Apparently Dell models often come with a similar disk.


Report •

#8
January 21, 2011 at 11:50:03
I have a xp pro sp3 disc that I downloaded from a msdn site. Do you think that would have everything on it that I need? Or would I be better off creating a slipstream disc with the motherboard's sata drivers on it with sp3? I can make one of those slipstream discs with a program like nLite right?
Also, the only thing I see in the bios settings that is Sata related is, Sata mode. I only have 2 options for it: IDE or Raid.

Then if I do get it half way working, which I have done once, the DMA is disabled, and it burns real slow. Iv'e tried resetting the DMA. And then the computer boots sooo slow, and hangs sooo much.

Hay, thanks for everyone's help and knowledge so far.


Report •

#9
January 21, 2011 at 12:54:30
SP3 is just that, a Service Pack. It does not contain SATA drivers.

You can slipstream SP3 and SATA drivers using nLite. In fact that is one of the best ways of doing it nLite is one of the better ways of making a slipstream disk providing you read the instructions carefully. Once you understand all the ins and outs it is quite a powerful piece of software.

Stuart


Report •

#10
January 21, 2011 at 13:50:38
"I have a xp pro sp3 disc that I downloaded from a msdn site."

It's probably technically illegal, as far as Microsoft is concerned, to download a copy of any of their software that you normally have to pay for, unless Microsoft itself provides it (e.g. apparently you can get Windows 3.1 from them, free).

It's NEVER legal, as far as Microsoft is concerned, to use a Product Key that you do not own - either you must have paid for it, or you must own a computer that has the official sticker.

The latter is more important to Microsoft than the former.
...........

If you have an official Microsoft sticker with the Product Key on it for the same version of Windows, Home or Pro (it doesn't matter whether it's got SPx updates or not) , which is supposed to be stuck to the outside of the computer case, that is the proof that you have a license to use that Windows version (you own the Product Key), and you can use an XP CD you have that came with the sticker, or a copy of one of the same version, Home or Pro.

Your Microsoft License allows to make one copy of your own Windows CD, for backup purposes in case the original CD is damaged.

It's perfectly legal, as far as Microsoft is concerned, for you to make a "slipstreamed" CD that has newer SP updates integrated into it by using your own XP CD's contents as the source of the files that you are integrating it into.
A CD-R is likely to work with virtually all CD or DVD drives - or a DVD-R if the drive can read them - other types of burned disks may not read properly in a drive they were not made in.

You must follow a proper procedure in the burning program you use, and there is a *.img file on Windows CDs and DVDs that is normally NOT visible in the operating system (or an equivalent file) even when the Views ettings in Window's Folder Options are custom set to show all files, that must be on the CD in order for the "slipstreamed" CD to be bootable.
Not all burning programs, including the simple one built into XP, can make a "slipstreamed" CD bootable.
E.g. Nero's Burning Rom module can, but that's usually not included in free versions of Nero, and some free burning software versions can. Most Paid versions of burning software can.

There are instructions all over the web for how to make a "slipstreamed" CD with SP3 updates integrated into the contents, using various versions of burning programs. There are similar instructions for how to integrate SATA drivers or other drivers into the CD's contents.
NOTE that if you use Nero's Burning Rom module, at least some versions have a bug - you must re-select something before you actually burn, otherwise the resulting CD will not be bootable. I have info about that for 6.x and 7.x versions of it.

"...the only thing I see in the bios settings that is Sata related is, Sata mode. I only have 2 options for it: IDE or Raid."

If you set that to IDE, you don't need to have SATA drive controller drivers installed in the operating system to use a SATA hard drive or optical drive - it's / they're recognized as (an) IDE compatible drive(s).

"....the DMA is disabled....

XP doesn't have the drivers built in for most things that first came out after XP was first released, circa 2001, and it doesn't have some of the drivers built in for things made before that.

The main chipset drivers for the mboard MUST be loaded in the operating system, otherwise it's likely the drives will not be able to run as fast as they are capable of because XP doesn't have the proper info about the main chipset's capabilities (main chipset "drivers" are mostly, or all, *.inf files that inform the operating system what the main chipset is capable of).

Whenever you load Windows from a regular Windows CD (or DVD) from scratch, after Setup is finished you must load the drivers for the mboard, particularly the main chipset drivers, in order for Windows to have the proper drivers for and information about your mboard hardware, including it's AGP or PCI-E, ACPI, USB 2.0 if it has it, and hard drive controller support. If you have a generic system and have the CD that came with the mboard, all the necessary drivers are on it. If you load drivers from the web, brand name system builders and mboard makers often DO NOT have the main chipset drivers listed in the downloads for your model - in that case you must go to the maker of the main chipset's web site, get the drivers, and load them.

Also, if you have an Intel main chipset and it's one of the earlier 8xx series that requires that you install the IAA (Intel Application Accelerator), you MUST install the IAA, otherwise the drives cannot run at the full speed they're cable of on the particular mboard. The IAA is listed in the downloads for the 8xx main chipset series on the Intel web site if it is required.

.....

If you have a problem with the drive's data cable, Windows may detect too many data errors from the drive and automatically make a line in the Registry (without any error message appearing) that prevents that particular drive from using any UDMA mode (in will be set to PIO mode, and changing it to UDMA if available, saving settings, then going back in to look will find it's still in PIO mode) . Your SATA optical drive is probably supposed to show it's in UDMA4 mode (66 mbytes/sec max burst data transfer speed) , if your main chipset supports ATA66 or UDMA 66 or higher burst speed drives.

By the way, there is no advantage to using a SATA optical drive in comprison to an IDE optical drive regarding it's max burst data transfer speed, if the drive has the same or similar specs otherwise - the max UDMA4 / ATA66 / UDMA 66 rating is determined by the max speed the disk can be spun at without being likely to fly apart, and by the max density of the data that can be stored on current disks. That's not going to change until the disks are made of something that be safely spun faster, or they come up with disks that can store a lot more data on them in one circle of a data track on the disk than they presently do.
It doesn't matter, when a SATA optical drive is on a system, whether the SATA controllers are set in the bios to an IDE compatible mode or a SATA mode - the max burst speed is the same.

Depending on what main chipset brand you have, or in any case if it's not an Intel one, that's either shown in Device Manager - IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers - xxxx IDE channel - Properties - Advanced settings tab
or if you DO have an Intel main chipset and it's one of the earlier 8xx series that requires that you install the IAA (Intel Application Accelerator), the mode the drives are in are shown in the IAA in your all Programs list.

If you DO have an Intel main chipset and it's one of the earlier 8xx series that requires that you install the IAA (Intel Application Accelerator), you MUST install the IAA, othewise the drives cannot run at their full speed they're cable of on the particular mboard.
......

Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.
.....

If you can't get the SATA optical drive to use a UDMA mode after correcting the problem that caused the data errors, then you need to remove one or more specific lines from the Registry - we can tell you how to do that.
.......

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittent, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.

80 wire data cables must have the proper end connector connected to the mboard IDE header - usually that's blue, but in any case it's the one farther from the middle connector on a 3 connector data cable.
.......

"....the computer boots sooo slow, and hangs sooo much....."

In addition to the above causes, if it's not a "fresh" installation, there are all sorts of things that can cause Windows to be slower than it once was with the same hardware components and amount of ram.




Report •

#11
January 21, 2011 at 14:31:35
"I have a xp pro sp3 disc that I downloaded from a msdn site."

I take it that billyhead downloaded just SP3. The fact that SP3 for XP Professional and SP3 for Home is identical has probably escaped him.

MSDN stands for Miscrosoft Developers Network and you wont get a pirate copy of Windows XP there.

Stuart


Report •

#12
January 21, 2011 at 14:49:29
""I have a xp pro sp3 disc that I downloaded from a msdn site.""

"I take it that billyhead downloaded just SP3. The fact that SP3 for XP Professional and SP3 for Home is identical has probably escaped him."

A SP3 updates CD, alone, is not the operating system CD, and it's the same for Home, Pro, and XP MCE.
Microsoft has never made a SP3 updates CD available, that I know of, but the SP3 updates download is free (it doesn't make a CD) , and is available via the Windows Updates web page or separately on the Microsoft web site - you need the latter in order to make a "slipstreamed" XP CD that has SP3 updates integrated into it from the contents of a CD that does not have SP3 updates integrated into it.

If what you downloaded is the contents of an XP Pro CD with SP3 updates integrated into it, that's technically an illegal download, as far as Microsoft is concerned.
It's only of use to you, legally, as far as Microsoft is concerned, if you own an XP Pro Product Key.


Report •

#13
January 21, 2011 at 15:44:40
Microsoft has never made a SP3 updates CD available, that I know of, but the SP3 updates download is free (it doesn't make a CD)

SP3 as available as an ISO and you can make a CD of that, in fact you have no choice, you have to make a CD, It is can also be downloaded as an .exe file. It was also available on CD.

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/...

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/322...

Stuart


Report •

#14
January 21, 2011 at 16:33:18
Stuart S

OK then, thanks for the info.


Report •


Ask Question