Solved Need expert opinions to help with my new build

December 17, 2013 at 12:15:59
Specs: Windows 7 Ultimate, i5 4670K/12 GB
I purchased a new computer for Christmas 2013 and would like expert advice about where my weak points are in the system so I can upgrade in the near future. Here is my list of parts:

Case: Rosewill Thor V2 full tower
Motherboard: Asus Z87 Pro
Proc: Intel 4670K
CPU Cooling: Corsair H55 watercooler
Ram: G-skill 12GB 1333
Video: EVGA 770 Superclocked w/ ACX cooling (I have an EVGA GTX 460 that I can use for physix if I upgrade my PSU. Will it help?)
PSU: Antec Earthwatts 750
SSD: Samsung 840 Evo 256GB
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate

I do plan to overclock using Asus 4-way Optimization. I use the computer to game (Saints Row 4, Starcraft 2, Skyrim, and whatever else).


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✔ Best Answer
December 18, 2013 at 16:20:08
Please read:
http://www.overclock.net/t/1401976/...
and also:
http://www.overclockers.com/3step-g...

Follow the steps and make sure you understand what you are doing and (more important) what you really want out of your system. If you want a good, fast, everyday machine, you are not going to do any extreme overclocking so when you reach a good balance between speed and temperature and you are 100% stable, quit. If you are happy but it is running a bit hot, back down a little bit on the OC and try a little bit less voltage, then stability test again, to enter a better temperature range.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
December 17, 2013 at 15:52:30
What of that list have you bought, if anything?

I am not a fan of bottom mounted cases. IMO all that is needed is ONE 140MM rear mounted fan plus the fan/s in the top mounted PSU. All those other fans do is churn the air inside, instead of discharging it out the rear.

The PSU is not what is currently recommended because it has 4 - 25A@+12V rails. Current thinking is ONE large +12V rail. Theoretically 25A should power most graphics cards but?

Also IMO water cooling is unnecessary and expensive.

If you haven't yet bought anything then post links to all the items listed above so we can review them with the correct product.


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#2
December 17, 2013 at 16:24:26
Thanks for the response OtheHill
I had some parts and bought others. I already have the PSU and RAM. If what I have isn't good enough, I'm open to suggestions.

The rest of the parts have already been purchased through Newegg and are wrapped under my tree. But that doesn't mean that I'm unwilling to send back parts. Shoprunner means free return shipping.

Explain what you said about water cooling being unnecessary and expensive. What do you recommend when overclocking? Watercooling doesn't seem to be much more expensive than air cooling.


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#3
December 17, 2013 at 16:37:04
The RAM is wrong. The minimum speed should be DDR3-1600 but if you plan on overclocking, you should be getting even faster rated RAM. Also, do NOT overclock using "Asus 4-way Optimization". Overclocking should be done manually thru tweaking of the individual BIOS settings.

Other than that, I totally agree with OtheHill's comments about the case, PSU, & water cooling.


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Related Solutions

#4
December 17, 2013 at 16:45:10
Change out the memory for 1866MHz memory, the slower memory will be limiting.
A better choice for CPU cooling in general is a better air cooler for gaming overclocking ($30. to $65.) since there are less parts to cause problems later and they will cool just about the same at the settings that are logical for gaming.
Look at the Corsair 750 power supplies, they are of a much better quality and will deliver a real 750 watts. If you plan on adding a second graphics card, go with the 1000Watt version and it will only make sense to add a second card that is the same specs.
I have noticed that you CAN use a bottom mounted power supply, BUT you have to do things a little bit differently. You need to invert the power supply so that it draws the air from inside of the case rather than from the bottom of the case (bottom filters clog and you will not know it until you start having troubles). You need to use ONE rear fan high in the rear set to exhaust, One top fan set to exhaust or a second rear fan depending on the case configuration. You CAN use one front fan set to INTAKE to draw air in and blow it over the hard drives and towards the graphics card(s). You SHOULD remove or disconnect any side fans, they do not help and cause turbulence that will reduce the smooth air flow through the case.
You did not list any conventional hard drive. You should use your SSD drive for Windows and for your programs, but you should use a conventional drive for saving personal files and game statistics. this will prolong your SSD's life and you can also store an image of your SSD drive on the hard drive in case you ever need to replace the drive.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
December 17, 2013 at 17:24:18
Thanks for the responses. Here are my takeaways:
Get faster RAM. People keep saying 1600 or 1866
My PSU needs to be addressed. Also, make sure its mounted correctly
Disable side 230mm fan on side panel

I use a Drobo 5N for all data so I don't have need for internal HDDs

Can I ask what is wrong with Asus 4-way optimization? I wanted to use that since I'm such a noob to overclocking and it scares me a little to do it manually. I'm willing to educate myself and do it properly, I just got really excited when reading/watching (youtube) about it.


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#6
December 18, 2013 at 16:20:08
✔ Best Answer
Please read:
http://www.overclock.net/t/1401976/...
and also:
http://www.overclockers.com/3step-g...

Follow the steps and make sure you understand what you are doing and (more important) what you really want out of your system. If you want a good, fast, everyday machine, you are not going to do any extreme overclocking so when you reach a good balance between speed and temperature and you are 100% stable, quit. If you are happy but it is running a bit hot, back down a little bit on the OC and try a little bit less voltage, then stability test again, to enter a better temperature range.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#7
December 18, 2013 at 21:57:46
Two points about the RAM. First point is to buy RAM that adheres to the JEDEC standard of 1.5V. Many faster RAM modules may have specs that show as much as 1.65V. IMO those are nothing more than juiced RAM.

Second point is that most motherboard manufacturers have a list on their website of RAM they have tested on that model board. Buying RAM off that list should assure you of trouble free operation. This becomes even more important when overclocking.

I just thought of a third point. Be sure you buy RAM in matched sets. This is RAM that has been tested by the manufacturer to assure the RAM modules are as close as possible to identical.

See the link below.

http://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards...

In addition to the above you can use dual channel kits and buy 2 kits to fill the 4 slots or buy a quad channel kit which will fill all 4 slots with perfectly matched modules. If you buy a dual channel kit be sure to mark the modules as a pair so if later on you buy another kit that is supposedly the exact same you do not mix the two kits up. see the link below for examples of dual channel and quad channel kits.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...


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