Solved My Ex Misses Stuffed-up my Asus laptop password

Asus Asus f5 x50sl x50r x50m f5vl f5n f5...
August 10, 2013 at 07:43:33
Specs: Vista BIZ, Duo T2330
My Ex Ha Stuff up My Laptop Passwords an I cant get into Bios an change So Can anyone help me wth mtsr hard drive rest password ... PLZ PlZ Plz

See More: My Ex Misses Stuffed-up my Asus laptop password

Report •


#1
August 10, 2013 at 07:50:27
✔ Best Answer
Contact the laptop manufacturer and be prepared to prove ownership.

Hard disk password are designed to be difficult to crack as laptops can be so easily stolen..

It is the policy of this forum not to help with passwords as it is impossible to prove ownership.

Stuart


Report •

#2
August 10, 2013 at 07:56:19
It was sold to me ages ago so i can't prove it is mine on the Data Base .... The person who brought it I don't see an havent seen in quite along while now ... Years ......

Report •

#3
August 10, 2013 at 08:06:13
There are some Linux based programs to clear the password on the hard drive. There are also ways to clear the BIOS password.

http://www.computerhope.com/issues/...

http://pcsupport.about.com/od/windo...

Google for more.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
August 10, 2013 at 08:08:53
This is a very easy problem as you know someone that knows the password. Just tell your Ex that as it is a criminal offence to access someone els's computer you will report the matter to the Police if she doesn't supply you with the password pronto. The penalties for this sort of offence are quite severe.

Report •

#5
August 10, 2013 at 08:48:16
Yeah try'd calling the cops but they just said how can They prove she done it .... An I just have to deal with it ..... I don't want to loose all my pics of my kids an all the other stuff on it ....

Report •

#6
August 10, 2013 at 08:51:14
At worst, you can pull the hard drive out and mount it via USB in another computer to get your data.

http://www.everydaysource.com/produ...

www.standby-it.com


Report •

#7
August 10, 2013 at 08:59:04
Perhaps not if it's a hard drive password.

I appreciate your dilemma, but if you can't prove ownership of the laptop and the Police don't want to know then you're basically stuffed. You're just going to have to give it up as irretrievably broken and buy a new laptop. Believe me, this will be the least of your expenses related to divorce.

I find it very surprising that your wife is not interested in pictures of her kids. How is she going to get them if she won't tell you the password. Other than suing her in the civil courts I can't see any answer to your problem.


Report •

#8
August 10, 2013 at 09:38:00
At worst, you can pull the hard drive out and mount it via USB in another computer to get your data.

Thais not going to work either. The idea of the hard disk password is to protect the data in case the laptop is stolen. If it were as easy as putting the drive in another computer that would be no protection at all.

The password is secured by putting the password on the disk and also in a chip on the motherboard. The two have to match in order for the hard disk to start up. No motherboard chip, no start up.

Stuart


Report •

#9
August 10, 2013 at 09:55:25
IF the hard drive has a password on it from the BIOS level, agreed. I am doing a little assuming based on the aspect that the hard drive password could be "Windows" or maybe just BIOS password or something else based on how the OP put together the question.

What's the actual model of the laptop?

www.standby-it.com


Report •

#10
August 10, 2013 at 11:17:05
The OP says it's a hard disk password and I see no reason to doubt him. They are very common on laptops.

We shouldn't even be discussing this further than to say involve the manufacturer or the Police. They can determine how genuine this is, which we cannot. Let's not keep sounding off to the world in general about possibly strategies to circumvent passwords designed to protect laptop owners from theft.


Report •

#11
August 10, 2013 at 17:02:46
Edit: Ignore

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.

message edited by guapo


Report •

#12
August 12, 2013 at 14:52:03
ijack, rereading the original post does clearly indicate this is a hard drive password or not. I agree it probably is, because a BIOS password usually will not stop you from booting. Just can't change the boot order or any other CMOS settings.

Report •

#13
August 13, 2013 at 11:53:41
Reply #7: "You're just going to have to give it up as irretrievably broken and buy a new laptop. Believe me, this will be the least of your expenses related to divorce."

I completely disagree. The hardware itself may be inexpensive compared to other tangible things forcefully traded in a divorce, but memories provided by pictures and other such personal data far outweighs the cost of tangible items. Items can be replaced, memories cannot. Do NOT give up on those locked pictures. Follow the court system in your area to get her to provide the password or sue her if she cannot provide it.

--------------------------------------------------
Apologies if I don't respond to your reply immediately. I don't check this site daily, but you're welcome to PM me as a reminder.


Report •

#14
August 13, 2013 at 12:27:46
How much this thread has gone off key. He already got a hold of authorities and they are along the lines (in response) of the rest of what would happen in court.

Can anyone prove 100% that she did it? If not, this is a waste of time and possibly his money, and guess what.. no pictures!! At this point, all you can do is grasp at straws, and shoot in the dark hoping to hit target. None of us know what the actual model of the laptop is, so who knows what options are truly available. Possible solutions to start:

1. CALL the manufacturer. Who knows, maybe the laptop was registered by someone else or you and you dont remember. You NEVER know what they can do to help you.

2. While on the phone with ASUS (assuming its ASUS) see if there is ANY 3rd part software out there that they can recommend to remove the software or clear the password.

3. Reset the CMOS to try and get into the BIOS, normally doesn't happen but worth a shot here. Also may be able to get into the BIOS with a master password, just depends on your BIOS.

4. If there is a password on the drive, you wont be able to access the data on another workstations. But for 30 bucks vs loss of memories, I think its worth a shot.

Please supply the exact make/model of the laptop & BIOS (if possible), that way we can figure out what BIOS it is. Thanks.

www.standby-it.com


Report •

#15
August 13, 2013 at 12:45:46
It's certainly not off topic for someone with a password protected drive to be told by a helpful person here say, "We can't help you. Contact the police or forget about the problem," then have another helpful person say, "Go beyond the police and don't ignore the problem because you won't get that data back. Mementos are very important and you'll regret losing them later."

Once the OP acknowledged that it is a password problem set by someone else, there is nothing we helpers can do as it is against the community rules to aid in circumventing passwords except have the OP contact previous ownership through to the manufacturer. We certainly don't have the ability to prove ownership or the circumstances of the situation. Even if we did and provided steps to circumvent the password, any less scrupulous reader could follow such directions and gain unauthorized access to a computer.

These replies are very much "on key" to the original post.

--------------------------------------------------
Apologies if I don't respond to your reply immediately. I don't check this site daily, but you're welcome to PM me as a reminder.

message edited by Xps86


Report •

#16
August 13, 2013 at 17:10:10
Depending on the courts or police, is a total waste of time. That's an example of when the book answer is dwarfed by the real life answer. The real life answer is the hard drive has to be removed, connected to a another PC & booted with Linux or Unix. I would have those pics in a few hours.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

#17
August 13, 2013 at 19:15:55
"The real life answer is the hard drive has to be removed, connected to a another PC & booted with Linux or Unix. I would have those pics in a few hours."

No you wouldn't. As the OP stated in his first post, it's a hard drive password, you wouldn't get anywhere.


Report •

#18
August 14, 2013 at 00:48:07
#15 "Even if we did and provided steps to circumvent the password, any less scrupulous reader could follow such directions and gain unauthorized access to a computer."

Spot on. Not only do we not know who might see any information published here, but we have no way of verifying the provenance of the OP. He may or may not be genuine; if he is genuine then the people to help him are the manufacturers. A reluctance to contact them is not reassuring.

#16 You overestimate your abilities. You would not be able to crack, or bypass, a hard-disk password.


Report •

#19
August 14, 2013 at 06:23:00
Unfortunately this type of request can be considered to be in the same context as "the check is in the mail".

However, Justin has stated here that we must consider each case individually and make a decision to help or not.

My feeling is that BIOS or hard drive passwords should be referred to the manufacturer. Windows login passwords are in a different category, IMO.

These are just as likely to be desktop computers as laptops.

BIOS and hard drive passwords do not protect the owner from loss of the hardware. Only the security of their data. So, if a poster has control of a computer that could be used simply by installing an operating system, we are not protecting much by refusing to help with a Windows password.

Weather we help or not the poster has the option to perform a factory restore in most cases. Because of these points I feel help given for Windows passwords may be OK. The plausibility of the story can determine our course of action.


Report •

#20
August 14, 2013 at 08:21:26
I'd be willing to take a shot at it. Unfortunately, the OP lives a few hours away, from me.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

#21
August 14, 2013 at 10:08:43
Additionally, the hard drive can be removed and saved for later while a new hard drive installed so the OP can still use the laptop.

--------------------------------------------------
Apologies if I don't respond to your reply immediately. I don't check this site daily, but you're welcome to PM me as a reminder.


Report •

#22
August 14, 2013 at 11:47:16
Well, if you're going to talk plausibility I find it hard to believe that a mother is prepared to lock all the pictures of her kid away just so that she can get one over on the father. Most women I know would be anxious to get a copy of those pictures from the father.

Anyway, I've had my say. If the site has no policy on passwords I'm happy to tell all and sundry how to hack into the computer. But I still can't crack a hard disk password - they're too clever for me.


Report •

#23
August 14, 2013 at 11:50:46
ijack

This case has been handled correctly. BIOS and hard drive password help needs to come from the manufacturer. Windows log-in passwords - Maybe?


Report •

#24
August 14, 2013 at 14:11:53
Personally, I find it hard to believe the OP is more than 14 years old. Look how his posts are written. Words that shouldn't be capitalized are, shortened text speak, atrocious spelling and grammar, it doesn't add up. It sounds more like a story designed to tug at our heart strings and makes you want to help.

Report •

#25
August 14, 2013 at 14:42:14
THX 1138

That is my spin on it too. Mom locked him out for some reason.


Report •

#26
August 14, 2013 at 14:46:55
Agreed.

I had the password written down on a piece of paper but the dog chewed it would probably elicit a more sympathetic response.

Stuart


Report •

#27
August 15, 2013 at 07:33:06
THX 1138. From what I can see, the OP is about 30 years old but may have a son about 19. Maybe he wants more than pics off of that drive since he mentioned other "stuff". Either way, he seems to have disappeared from the thread. His last post was on the 10th. I imagine that he decided to look elsewhere for help.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.


Report •

#28
August 15, 2013 at 07:54:42
The OP is about 30 and his son is 19? I don't think so! Think about what you said.

Report •

#29
August 15, 2013 at 08:40:35
Sorry, you are correct. That was another Danny from the same neighborhood.

How do you know when a politician is lying? His mouth is moving.

message edited by guapo


Report •

Ask Question