My DVD drive doesn’t work just after changing mboard batte

September 27, 2012 at 02:09:04
Specs: Windows XP
My DVD drive doesn’t work just after changing motherboard battery. Even DVD-RW icon isn’t shown in my computer. I’ve checked the cables, they were ok. What should I do? I would be thankful if you help me.
PS. I have PC.

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#1
September 27, 2012 at 05:17:21
After you change your motherboard coin battery you then need to go into your BIOS set up and reset things. You should first reset defaults and then go back in and set the time, boot order, hard drive settings, and check the CPU and memory settings to make sure they are all OK. Your BIOS should recognize your DVD drive at this stage or else there was something you disconnected while swapping out the battery. Please confirm that you unplugged the computer before you removed the battery, if you failed to unplug it from the AC power, you may have done damage.
Post results and additional details.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
September 27, 2012 at 08:57:21
Thank you but if you mean the blue window which is appeared by pressing “Del” I’ve already opened it, but it couldn’t detect my DVD-RW drive. Also there isn’t any option to choose DVD drive for booting!

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#3
September 27, 2012 at 14:02:59
Something may have happened while you were inside the case. Did you disconnect anything? Does the DVD drive tray open and close?

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Related Solutions

#4
September 27, 2012 at 19:57:50
Did you ground yourself of any static charge? Touching internal components with a static potential can damage components, memory, and parts of the motherboard,
Did you reset defaults?
Did you check other settings?
Did you try another signal cable and a different power connector to the drive?
Do you have another DVD drive to test the motherboard and see if it is the drive that somehow was damaged?

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
September 27, 2012 at 22:50:45
@DAVEINCAPS
No, I haven’t disconnected anything. There is a cable from the back of drive to power and one to mother board. My DVD drive tray opens and closes, but sometimes it keeps freezing!

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#6
September 27, 2012 at 23:00:43
@Fingers
Even in device manager my DVD-RW drive isn’t shown. It means this hardware is unfamiliar to my PC, doesn’t it? I have another CD-RW drive. It works properly. Usually static potential doesn’t let windows come up. It has already happened to me and I’ve repaired it by connecting my PC to earth wall plug.

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#7
September 28, 2012 at 17:00:27
Even unfamiliar hardware would show in device manager but with a remark that there is some problem with it, such as drivers not installed.

You indicated above that the bios isn't seeing the drive. That's where the problem is--not with windows. Either the drive is bad, there's something wrong with the connection or it's improperly configured in cmos/bios setup. If the motherboard has SATA support you need to verify that whichever type the DVD drive is, it's enabled.

But you say you have another DVD-RW drive that works. I assume you mean it works in that PC. If so, the other one must be bad.


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#8
September 28, 2012 at 19:56:20
As in #1 & #7, if it does not show up in BIOS, the drive is bad or the signal or power connection is bad. Try a different cable and a different power plug (there are always spares). This was stated before but you appear to be ignoring it.

Electrostatic Discharge from YOU to a component in your computer case CAN damage some components by putting briefly a high voltage where there is supposed to be little or nearly none. When an electrostatic potential (you) comes in contact with anything that will allow it to move to a ground or lower electrostatic potential, you are getting a FLOW of that charge from the high potential to the lower potential and you effectively have briefly made a circuit and it will flow as a measurable voltage. It is this voltage that can be fairly high (enough sometimes to jump a gap which is fairly high) that can damage some more delicate components. I am not saying that you DID damage this way, just that it is a real possibility and needs to be considered when handling components and when a component that was working suddenly no longer works after working within the computer's case.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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