Solved My computer won't boot up

March 11, 2017 at 19:07:09
Specs: Windows 10, Intel i3/Corsair Vengeance LPX 1x8gb
I recently bought a gigabyte H110M-A motherboard and some other components, I connected all the other parts and all the cables correctly but there is one 4-pin socket left labeled ATX 12V and i don't find any cable that is left unplugged from my PSU other than one labeled CPU which is an 8-pin connector that is separated into 2 4-pin cables, you might think that my problem is over if i just connect one into that socket but when i do the computer turns off like 5 seconds later and on again like if it did not have enough power to stay on.
Please help me solve this problem and if you ever had a similar problem please contact me and tell me how you solved it.

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✔ Best Answer
March 12, 2017 at 05:06:40
Hi Greg,

it is my understanding for ATX mobo's there is not a HARD AND FAST set of psu connectors. They can vary, see:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATX

Because of the variances the psu chosen must provide *ALL* connectors to match *ALL* the mobo sockets.

I may be wrong, but I think the socket you are referring to, was added to provide an additional supply for Graphics Cards. Because it was found, when fitted to a pc, they were drawing too much power from the regular connector and causing some of its pins to overheat, so much that the pins virtually welded to the connector.such that it could not be removed without much difficulty.

If this is true AND you do not intend adding a Graphics Card, you may get away with not supplying that socket.

Good Luck - Keep us posted.

message edited by Mike Newcomb



#1
March 11, 2017 at 19:35:21
You should never post your email address on open forums, it will open you up to all sorts of spam.

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#2
March 11, 2017 at 20:05:54
Do you have a speaker connected? Any beeps?

CPU fan connected to the right connector? (CPU_FAN)
CPU cooler correctly installed? Thermal-paste?

Reset the BIOS by removing the coin battery for a few minutes or CLEAR CMOS procedure (see manual). make sure the AC power is disconnected from the box.


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#3
March 11, 2017 at 21:59:15
When splitting that 8 pin connector in half, take care to use the correct half. They are not the same.

What are you using for graphics?


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Related Solutions

#4
March 12, 2017 at 05:06:40
✔ Best Answer
Hi Greg,

it is my understanding for ATX mobo's there is not a HARD AND FAST set of psu connectors. They can vary, see:-

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATX

Because of the variances the psu chosen must provide *ALL* connectors to match *ALL* the mobo sockets.

I may be wrong, but I think the socket you are referring to, was added to provide an additional supply for Graphics Cards. Because it was found, when fitted to a pc, they were drawing too much power from the regular connector and causing some of its pins to overheat, so much that the pins virtually welded to the connector.such that it could not be removed without much difficulty.

If this is true AND you do not intend adding a Graphics Card, you may get away with not supplying that socket.

Good Luck - Keep us posted.

message edited by Mike Newcomb


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#5
March 12, 2017 at 05:20:53
You jumped ahead too far and should have started with a bench test. Please see link below or Google 'Bench Test my new computer build'.
http://www.techsupportforum.com/for...

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
March 12, 2017 at 06:45:35
The ATX12V socket provides power to the CPU. Most motherboards have a 4-pin socket, some have an 8-pin. And some power supply manufacturer's include a 4+4-pin plug allowing it to be used for either type board. All the various plug types are explained here: http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuco...

Other than that, I agree with Fingers that you should always bench-test hardware before installing it in the case. It would help to post the make/model/wattage of your power supply; it may simply be of poor quality.

https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboard...


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