Solved My BIOS won't recognise my USB keyboard

July 22, 2011 at 06:59:54
Specs: Windows 7
My BIOS won't recognise my USB keyboard, but since my keyboard is USB/not recognised, I can't access the BIOS to change it to recognise USB (I assume that's the problem). Is there any other solution? Do I just need to buy a new non-USB keyboard to use this one, 5-minute time?

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✔ Best Answer
July 22, 2011 at 15:58:09
"The first time I installed Windows 7, my keyboard was recognised."

If that was with the same mboard and a USB keyboard, then either
- the bios default was that Legacy USB devices or similar was enabled
- or - you or someone else enabled that setting.

"I think when I installed Windows 7 that time (it was originally Windows XP) it must have changed the BIOS options perhaps?"

Since enabling or disabling Legacy USB Devices or similar is a bios setting, the operating system you're installing has nothing to do with that.
If that setting was disabled, there's no way you could boot the computer from the DVD with a USB keyboard,.

Some brand name system installations have software that allows you to access the bios in Windows, but as far as I know that's not possible if only Windows was installed.
However, you can usually change the time and date in the bios automtically by changing them in the operating system.

" I'd rather not mess around with the actual hardware since I don't know what I'm doing at all."

It's not rocket science.
See the Owner's or User's manual for your brand name system, or if you have a generic system, see the manual for your mboard model.

" Other than that option, I'm gathering that the best bet is to just get a new keyboard? "

Being able to use a PS/2 keyboard can't be disabled by any bios setiing.
If your computer has a PS/2 port for a keyboard, all you need to do is borrow a PS/2 keyboard, plug it in before booting the computer (into the purple PS/2 port) and change the setting in the bios for Legacy USB devices or similar to Enablled, Save bios settings.
Then use your USB keyboard.
(DO NOT unplug or plug in a PS/2 connected keyboard while the computer is running.
You can connect more than one keyboard to the computer at the same time if they're not using the same type of port, but you can only use one of them at a time.).



#1
July 22, 2011 at 07:06:01
Does the USB keyboard work in Windows? If not, it has nothing to do with the BIOS settings. However, if you want to be able to use it to access the BIOS, you will have to 1st enable "USB legacy support" & to do that, you'll probably need a PS/2 keyboard.

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#2
July 22, 2011 at 07:14:11
It works perfectly in Windows. I've been using it this way for close to a year, actually, and it has only become a problem now that I want to reinstall Windows. It says "press any key to start from DVD drive" and well... I can't.

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#3
July 22, 2011 at 07:27:02
How did you manage to install Windows the first time? Did your computer come with a PS/2 keyboard?

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Related Solutions

#4
July 22, 2011 at 09:45:47
If you can get your hands on a USB-to-PS2 converter (usually a little green connector), you may be able to try using your USB KB as a PS2 device (assuming the keyboard itself is still working).

1 Corinthians 15:3-4


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#5
July 22, 2011 at 10:35:07
"It works perfectly in Windows. I've been using it this way for close to a year, actually, and it has only become a problem now that I want to reinstall Windows. It says "press any key to start from DVD drive" and well... I can't."

NOTE that if the bios detects no bootable hard drive partition (that has an operating system installed on it), you WILL NOT see "Press any key to boot from CD " or similar while booting. If the Boot Order or similar is set correctly such that CD drive or similar is before Hard drive or network drive or similar, the bootable operating system CD or DVD will start loading it's files automatically.

I tried disabling USB Legacy support in the bios of one of my computers, then attempting to boot it from a XP Home CD - that does not work when the keyboard is USB connected.
.............

The default settings in older mboard bioses usually have USB Legacy devices or similar disabled; in newer bioses that's usually enabled by default.
If you have a desktop system with a fairly recent mboard, removing the mboard Cmos battery, then installing it again so that + is visible when it's installed, or moving the clear Cmos jumper on the mboard to the clear position, moving it back, will probably enable USB Legacy devices or similar in the bios.
However, you will get a Cmos Checksum Error or similar message when you boot after doing that, and you will need to set at least the current time and date in the bios, Save settings.
(If you can't enter the bios, usually setting the current time and date in the operating system automatically changes the time and date in the bios. Note that you may get error messages in the operating system that will go away when the time and date have been corrected. )
.........

"If you can get your hands on a USB-to-PS/2 converter (usually a little green connector), you may be able to try using your USB KB as a PS/2 device (assuming the keyboard itself is still working). "

There is likely at least one thing wrong with that statement.

A simple gender adapter that you plug into the connector on the end of cord for a keyboard or mouse to convert it for use in a PS/2 port WILL NOT WORK unless the keyboard or the mouse is a "combo" model - designed and wired up to be used with both types of ports. If it IS a "combo" keyboard or mouse, it came with the simple gender adapter when new
A simple gender adapter for a "combo" keyboard, often colored purple, usually will NOT work with a "combo" mouse, and a simple gender adapter for a "combo" mouse, often colored green, usually will NOT work with a "combo" keyboard, because the necessary connections are not there within the adapter.

There are USB (type A male) to PS/2 (one or two DIN female) adapters that have circuits between the connectors that allow you to connect a PS/2 only keyboard or mouse via a USB port, but I don't think there is such a thing for the opposite situation - adapters that have circuits between the connectors that allow you to connect a USB (only) keyboard to a PS/2 port.



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#6
July 22, 2011 at 15:03:00
The first time I installed Windows 7, my keyboard was recognised. I think when I installed Windows 7 that time (it was originally Windows XP) it must have changed the BIOS options perhaps? Tubes and Wires, I'd rather not mess around with the actual hardware since I don't know what I'm doing at all. Other than that option, I'm gathering that the best bet is to just get a new keyboard? I was really hoping there was a way to modify my BIOS (or at least make my BIOS recognise USB drives) from Windows.

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#7
July 22, 2011 at 15:58:09
✔ Best Answer
"The first time I installed Windows 7, my keyboard was recognised."

If that was with the same mboard and a USB keyboard, then either
- the bios default was that Legacy USB devices or similar was enabled
- or - you or someone else enabled that setting.

"I think when I installed Windows 7 that time (it was originally Windows XP) it must have changed the BIOS options perhaps?"

Since enabling or disabling Legacy USB Devices or similar is a bios setting, the operating system you're installing has nothing to do with that.
If that setting was disabled, there's no way you could boot the computer from the DVD with a USB keyboard,.

Some brand name system installations have software that allows you to access the bios in Windows, but as far as I know that's not possible if only Windows was installed.
However, you can usually change the time and date in the bios automtically by changing them in the operating system.

" I'd rather not mess around with the actual hardware since I don't know what I'm doing at all."

It's not rocket science.
See the Owner's or User's manual for your brand name system, or if you have a generic system, see the manual for your mboard model.

" Other than that option, I'm gathering that the best bet is to just get a new keyboard? "

Being able to use a PS/2 keyboard can't be disabled by any bios setiing.
If your computer has a PS/2 port for a keyboard, all you need to do is borrow a PS/2 keyboard, plug it in before booting the computer (into the purple PS/2 port) and change the setting in the bios for Legacy USB devices or similar to Enablled, Save bios settings.
Then use your USB keyboard.
(DO NOT unplug or plug in a PS/2 connected keyboard while the computer is running.
You can connect more than one keyboard to the computer at the same time if they're not using the same type of port, but you can only use one of them at a time.).


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#8
July 23, 2011 at 12:16:25
Ok thank you. I'm going to ask around and see if I can find a PS/2 keyboard to borrow for 5 minutes. Most people I know have laptops, which is a bit of a problem so far, but I'm sure someone has one in a closet or something. Thanks

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#9
July 23, 2011 at 16:13:17
Thanks for the Thanks.

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