MSI MS-7093 Mboard; Want Gcard Upgrade Advice

April 22, 2010 at 09:08:26
Specs: Windows XP, Athlon 64 3400+ 2.19 GHz/ 3 GB RAM
Hey there, I just need some help sloshing
through the sea of information on graphics
cards...I'm not ready to buy a whole new
computer just yet, but I'm desperately in need
of a graphics upgrade. My machine is an HP
Pavilion a1129n with an MSI MS-7093
motherboard, which has a single PCI Express
x16 graphics slot. What's the best I can do
here?

Edit: current graphics card is an ATI Raedon Xpress 200


See More: MSI MS-7093 Mboard; Want Gcard Upgrade Advice

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#1
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#2
April 22, 2010 at 12:35:26
A list here rates the relative performance of many video card chipsets:
http://geeks.pirillo.com/profiles/b...

X2 after the chipset name = two of the same video chipset on one card.

"HP Pavilion a1129n"

Your computer probably has a 300 watt power supply:
http://partsurfer.hp.com/Search.asp...
http://partsurfer.hp.com/Search.asp...

Depending on which video chipset is on the card you choose, you may need a power supply with more capacity. Most Pavilion desktop models use a standard wired standard sized ATX power supply.
See Response 1 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

"MSI MS-7093"

Motherboard Specifications, MS-7093 (Albacore)
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/...

Video graphics

* Internal onboard graphics using system memory (in the RS480 chip)
* PCI Express x16 slot

Manual - there are two versions of the mboard model - with the RX480 chip, no onboard video, or with the RS480 chip, which has onboard video.
This is for the version without onboard video:
http://www.elhvb.com/mboards/OEM/HP...



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#3
April 22, 2010 at 13:37:29
Thanks Tubesandwires, that was helpful.

1. Yeah, my Mboard is the one with integrated graphics
2. I should be able to use a PCI Express 2.1 card in my PCI
Express 1.0 slot without trouble, right? Obviously the
throughput will be quite a bit less, of course.
3. I'm toying with the idea of purchasing the ATI Radeon
5970, since it's supposed to be pretty top-of-the-line, and just
migrating it to my new machine when I decide to build myself
something more modern. Any thoughts?


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Related Solutions

#4
April 22, 2010 at 15:01:52
A PCI -E 2.1 card is supposed to be backward compatible with older PCI-E slot standards, so the card should work, but.....
- the higher the PCI-E slot spec, the more current a card in it is allowed to draw, so you MAY have problems if you choose a card with a video chipset a higher capacity power supply is required for, e.g. over 400 watts - some of the circuits to the PCI-E slot MAY burn out,
- and - there MAY be some features of the 2.1 card card that cannot be supported when it's installed in a PCI-E 1.0 rated slot - a slower max data transfer rate, and less fancy features may be substituted for fancier features - but you probably won't notice that except when you play recent or fairly recent games.

XP can't support higher than (Microsoft's) DirectX 9.0c (Windows XP with SP2 and above updates has DirectX 9.0c built in). If the video chipset is capable of supporting DirectX 10 or higher, that can only be supported in Vista and Windows 7. The DirectX 10 and above features that XP can't support will have DirectX 9 features substituted for them - again, probably only noticeable in recent or fairly recent games.


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#5
April 22, 2010 at 15:15:05
Okay, so would it prevent circuit burnout if I upgraded the power
source as well, or is that something completely different?

And on the DirectX, would the modern card work okay with XP,
just without the shiny new 10.0 features? The only games I'm
really interested in playing right now are Second Life and EVE-
Online, and I'd be happy with moderate performance for the time being, though of course I also want to squeeze out as much juice as I can


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#6
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#7
April 22, 2010 at 18:12:58
"Okay, so would it prevent circuit burnout if I upgraded the power
source as well, or is that something completely different?"

No, it's something different.
The problem is that the circuit traces - a narrow, thin layer of copper - on the mboard surface to the PCI-E slot could burn out. You could get around that in theory by soldering extra copper wires between the places a circuit trace could burn out between, but you'd have to know which places to install them. You're probably pretty safe if the video chipset on the card requires the system have a 400 watt minimum power supply capacity or less - the power supply itself can have more capacity than that, as long as the video chipset doesn't require more than a minimum 400 watt power supply.

"And on the DirectX, would the modern card work okay with XP,
just without the shiny new 10.0 features? "

Yes, as I provided info about in Response 4.


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#8
April 22, 2010 at 18:45:01
You'd probably be okay with a card with a video chipset that requires the system have a 450 watt minimum PS or less too, or no more than 500 watts. If you play games a lot, go for one that requires 450 or 400 watts minimum, or less.

E.g.

These are all on the web site jam pointed to....

ATI Radeon™ HD 4870 Series System Requirements

500 Watt or greater power supply with two 75W 6-pin PCI Express® power connectors recommended (600 Watt and four 6-pin connectors for ATI CrossFireX™ technology in dual mode)
http://www.amd.com/us/products/desk...
.....

A friend of mine has the Sapphire version of this, which has a superior fan design - it's an excellent card and costs about half what he paid for it, nowadays, circa $100 US.

ATI Radeon™ HD 4850 Graphics System Requirements

450 Watt or greater power supply with 75 Watt 6-pin PCI Express® power connector recommended (550 Watt and two 6-pin connectors for ATI CrossFireX™ technology in dual mode)
http://www.amd.com/us/products/desk...
850/Pages/ati-radeon-hd-4850-system-requirements.aspx

GeForce GTS 250 - System Requirements

* Minimum 400W or greater system power supply (with a minimum 12V current rating of 26A)
* One 6-pin supplementary power connector
http://www.xfxforce.com/en-us/produ...

ATI Radeon™ HD 5770 System Requirements

450 Watt or greater power supply with one 75W 6-pin PCI Express® power connectors recommended (600 Watt and two 6-pin connectors for ATI CrossFireX™ technology in dual mode)
http://www.amd.com/us/products/desk...


ATI Radeon™ HD 5830 System Requirements
500 Watt or greater power supply with two 75W 6-pin PCI Express® power connectors recommended (600 Watt and four 6-pin connectors for ATI CrossFireX™ technology in dual mode)
http://www.amd.com/us/products/desk...
.........

Others

GeForce GT 240
Requirements
Minimum of a 300 Watt power supply.
(Minimum recommended power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 18 Amps.)
http://www.evga.com/products/moreIn...
MSRP: $119.99 USD
$20 Mail-In Rebate Available

GeForce GTS 250
Minimum of a 450 Watt power supply.
(Minimum recommended power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 24 Amps.)
http://www.evga.com/products/moreIn...
EVGA Price $149.99

GeForce GTX 260
Requirements
Minimum of a 500 Watt power supply.
(Minimum recommended power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 36 Amps.)
Two available 6-pin PCI-E power dongles
http://www.evga.com/products/moreIn...
EVGA Price $219.99
...........................

Probably risky to use risk with your mboard:

ATI Radeon™ HD 5970 System Requirements

650 Watt or greater power supply one 75W 6-pin and one 150W 8-pin PCI Express® power connectors recommended (850 Watt with two 75W 6-pin and two 150W 8-pin connectors for ATI CrossFireX™ technology in dual mode)
http://www.amd.com/uk/products/desk...

GeForce GTX 285
Requirements
Minimum of a 550 Watt power supply.
(Minimum recommended power supply with +12 Volt current rating of 40 Amps.)
Two available 6-pin PCI-E power dongles
MSRP: $399.99 USD


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#9
April 22, 2010 at 18:52:13
Ok, great! That's exactly what I needed to know, thank you...I've
been drooling over the Radeon HD 5770 all day as it's got plenty
of power and is in my price range, but the power thing had me
concerned. Glad to see it's in your list of cards you think will be
fine in my system. I'll do a bit of research on power supplies
now...

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#10
April 23, 2010 at 04:30:50
Apparently you don't want to read this article?

Best Graphics Cards For The Money: April 2010


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#11
April 23, 2010 at 07:24:00
I did read it, Jam, but I'm sorry to say it wasn't much help to me;
still too much information overload. Tubesandwires has helped
me get a better grip on the subject and what I want and what I
can and can't do, though, so in fairness I'll give it another go now.

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#12
April 23, 2010 at 15:38:28
information overload?

If you don't intend to upgrade the power supply, the choices are easy...Radeon HD4670 w/GDDR3 or Geforce 240GT w/GDDR5. Those are the best gaming cards you can get that don't require the 6-pin PCIe plug-in. The HD 4670 has a max power consumption of about 60W & the 240 GT is rated at 70W. If you get anything better than that, the power supply will need to be upgraded. And when you consider that a decent low cost power supply (keyword being decent) will generally set you back at least $50 & a card like the Radeon HD 5770 goes for about $150, you'd be sinking $200 or more into an outdated S939 system that isn't even worth $200. IMO, it's not a wise investment.

http://slickdeals.net/permadeal/332...


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