MSI KT6V LSR Drives detected, won't boot

August 20, 2009 at 12:47:55
Specs: Windows XP, 1024mb
My battery went in my MSI KT6V LSR.
I've replaced it but all the settings are gone, i've fixed them to the best of my knowledge it detects all my drives (2 x hdd) (2 x dvd) but will only boot from a floppy.
I've editied the boot order but to no effect.
Thanks

See More: MSI KT6V LSR Drives detected, wont boot

Report •


#1
August 20, 2009 at 13:56:59
Did you change any cabling while inside the case?

Is your boot drive a SATA or an IDE?


Report •

#2
August 20, 2009 at 14:30:44
Apparently your mboard is a desktop model

SocketA KT600 ATX DDR400 AGP 5PCI SATA Sound LAN

I'm assuming you HAVE NOT changed which ram you have installed since the computer last worked properly, and you HAVE NOT been fiddling with anything inside the case other than the battery.
.......

When you have replaced the mboard (cmos) battery, you will get a "Cmos Checksum error" or similar message when you boot the computer - you have to go into the bios and set at least the date and time, save settings, otherwise that error will appear again every boot. Or if you are able to boot into Windows anyway, you can set the time and date in Windows, which changes those in the bios too.
If you have installed the battery backwards (e.g. if it's socket is flat on the mboard, + on the battery should be upwards where you can see it), or if the battery contacts are not connecting to the battery properly (bent or corroded) , or if the battery is too weak or dead, you will continue to get that same error every time you boot.

If you're NOT booting Windows from a hard drive connected to a drive controller card in a slot, your boot order that will work for almost all situations is floppy drive first, CD drive second, hard drive third, or similar.

If you list floppy drive after CD drive, in all the bioses I've tried that in, a bootable floppy is not recognized as bootable while booting - I've been told it will be recognized anyway in some newer bioses, but that's not likely for your mboard.

If you ARE booting Windows from a hard drive connected to a drive controller card in a slot, your boot order that will work for almost all situations is floppy drive first, CD drive second, SCSI, or similar.

If you are getting a message while booting "operating system not found", or similar.....

When you have two or more hard drives
- in the boot order of some bioses, all the hard drives are listed - as HDD0, HDD1, or similar, or by their model numbers. The drive you want to boot Windows from must be listed first.
- if your bios boot order list just says has one "hard drive" or similar , there is a list of hard drives somewhere in the bios Setup near the boot order - the model of the hard drive you want to boot from must be first in the list.

When you have two optical drives, if you want to be able to boot from a bootable CD in a drive, CD drive or similar must be in the boot order - it does not have to be first - if you have a floppy drive that should be first - as long as it is listed before any hard drive, or SCSI if you're using a drive controller card in a slot.

Some bioses will only boot from a bootable CD in a CD drive if it's in the first CD drive the bios detects. In that case, there is a list of optical (CD or DVD) drives somewhere in the bios Setup near the boot order - the model of the drive you want to boot a bootable CD or DVD from must be first in the list.

Of course, you can't boot a bootable DVD from a CD-rom (only), or a CD burner drive (burns and reads CDs, only).

If that doesn't help something else is wrong.
.......

If you DID NOT get the "Cmos Checksum error" or similar message and that's why you changed the battery,
OR if the computer stopped working normally and that's why you changed the battery.....

Desktop (and laptop) motherboards DO NOT normally quit working properly when the Cmos battery becomes too weak or dies.

Something else is wrong.

Some MSI models of this vintage are known to have developed this problem over time:

Open up your case and examine the mboard to see if you have bad capacitors, and/or other findable signs of mboard damage .

This was the original bad capacitor problem - has some example pictures.
History of why the exploding capacitors and which mboard makers were affected:
http://members.datafast.net.au/~dft...

What to look for, mboard symptoms, example pictures:
http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Home page that site
- what the problem is caused by
- he says there are STILL bad capacitors on more recent mboards.
http://www.badcaps.net/

Pictures of blown capacitors, other components - power supplies, Athlon cpu's, etc.:
http://www.halfdone.com/Personal/Jo...
......

If it doesn't look like you have that problem, then ...

Failing power supplies are common and can cause your symptoms.
Check your PS.
They often partially work, fans and hard drives may spin, leds may come on, yet you may get no video and the mboard will not boot all the way.
See response 4 in this:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

If it is failing, you can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS with the same capacity or greater.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD!)
You can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements.

OR

A common thing that can happen with ram, even ram that worked fine previously, is the ram has, or has developed, a poor connection in it's slot(s).
This usually happens a long time after the ram was installed, but it can happen with new ram, or after moving the computer case from one place to another, and I've had even new modules that needed to have their contacts cleaned.

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

.......


Report •

#3
August 21, 2009 at 02:47:19
I got the cmos error, set the time and date and haven't had it again.
Both my hdd's are on ide primary and my dvd's are on ide secondary, i've checked the master slave configuration and it hasn't changed.

I''ve changed the boot order after disabling the sata controller.

I recently added a 500w psu about 3 months ago which is plenty of power.

I can't see no bad capacitors.

And on one of the start up screens it shows me my processor and ram.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
August 21, 2009 at 09:27:01
Answer all questions in this please!!

Highlight, copy, and paste my questions into your post if you don't want to do a lot of typing.

Why did you replace the cmos battery in the first place?
Usually they last at least 5 years.
I have a similar mboard of about the same age and it's battery (CR2032) has not failed. I have older mboards the same battery type has not failed on yet.

ATX power supplies are always powering ATX mboards in some places, even when the computer is not running, as long as the PS is connected to the mboard, the PS is switched on if it has a switch, and the PS is being supplied with live AC power.

Did you unplug the computer / power supply, or otherwise switch off the AC power when you fiddling around inside your case, at ALL times?
If you DID NOT do that at any time, you can easily damage something, including the power supply, even if you just unplug or plug in a drive.

As both OtheHill and I have asked, did you fiddle with anything other than the battery initially? E.g. unplug something because it was in the way?

More description needed.

"....but will only boot from a floppy."

"I've editied the boot order.... "

"....on one of the start up screens it shows me my processor and ram."

Obviously the mboard is booting at least partially, and it sounds like the problem is the operating system is not loading or not loading properly from a hard drive.

Are you getting a message "Operating system not found" or similar when you try to boot from a hard drive?

If you're not, is the hard drive starting to load Windows but never finishes doing that?

Are you hearing the usual one beep most bioses make while booting when the POST has completed successfully ?

Does the intial boot process stall forever when you try booting from a hard drive?

Just replacing the cmos battery properly usually does not require much more that setting the date and time.
At worst,
- you get the "Operating system not found" or similar error, because default boot order or order of hard drives in a list in the bios is not suitable - you change boot order settings or the list of hard drives so the hard drive you want to boot from is listed first.
- the bios defaults to setting the ram and/or fsb speed slower than it was before and you need to enter a suitable setting for the ram and/or fsb speed manually, so the cpu is then running as fast as it was designed to.

Since you've been messing with bios settings and may have set something wrong, you may need to load bios defaults, then check the boot order settings, which hard and optical drives are listed first in a list, make sure the cpu is running at it's designed speed and if not make ram speed and/or fsb speed corrections, and make no other changes, save settings.

........

Unplug the case/power supply.
Power off your monitor.
Check all the connections of the wiring to make sure they are all the way onto their pins and into their sockets, especially the main connector from the power supply. The wires close to the mboard going into the main power connector/socket should be more or less perpendicular to the mboard surface rather than at an angle.
Unplug the main power connector and plug it back in.
Make sure the extra mboard power socket other than the main one has the connector and wiring from the PS plugged into it and it's well seated.
Make sure all cards in slots are all the way down in their slots.

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...


If you fiddled with the IDE cables at all......

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittant, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.

".....after disabling the sata controller."

You had no reason to do that.


"i've checked the master slave configuration and it hasn't changed."

If you haven't touched the jumpers on the drives, of course that hasn't changed.

"I recently added a 500w psu about 3 months ago..."

There are lots of el-cheapo power supplies out there that you're more likely to have problems with.

What is it's brand and model?

Why did you change the original one?

Do you have a power supply in another computer, or can you borrow a PS from a friend's system, you could temporarily try with this computer?
Your mboard will work fine with as little as a 250 watt capacity PS for testing purposes, depending on what the power requirements of the video card in a slot you have installed are.


Report •

#5
August 21, 2009 at 10:42:59
Usually they last at least 5 years.
I have a similar mboard of about the same age and it's battery (CR2032) has not failed. I have older mboards the same battery type has not failed on yet.

***Since i had the motherboard (years) this was the first time***.

ATX power supplies are always powering ATX mboards in some places, even when the computer is not running, as long as the PS is connected to the mboard, the PS is switched on if it has a switch, and the PS is being supplied with live AC power.

Did you unplug the computer / power supply, or otherwise switch off the AC power when you fiddling around inside your case, at ALL times?
If you DID NOT do that at any time, you can easily damage something, including the power supply, even if you just unplug or plug in a drive.

***It was unplug and i was grounded.***

As both OtheHill and I have asked, did you fiddle with anything other than the battery initially? E.g. unplug something because it was in the way?

***No i had a free gap to the battery and didn't touch anything else.***

More description needed.

***My 2 hdds (master & slave on ide primary) My 2 dvd drives (master & slave on ide secondary) are detected in the first bios screen but it doesn't boot either of them.
I ran dos from floppy, using seatools it checked both hdds and says their fine plus thr space remaining on hdd master means my OS is still there.***

"I've editied the boot order.... "

"....on one of the start up screens it shows me my processor and ram."

Obviously the mboard is booting at least partially, and it sounds like the problem is the operating system is not loading or not loading properly from a hard drive.

Are you getting a message "Operating system not found" or similar when you try to boot from a hard drive?

***Messing around using F8 it clearly stated Windows Xp Home Edition.
When booting in safe mode it reboots itself after mup.sys***

If you're not, is the hard drive starting to load Windows but never finishes doing that?

Are you hearing the usual one beep most bioses make while booting when the POST has completed successfully ?

***Its Ami and it beeps one short beep***

Does the intial boot process stall forever when you try booting from a hard drive?

***The boot process stops and it reboots itself back to the last known good configuraton screen and repeats this process.***

Just replacing the cmos battery properly usually does not require much more that setting the date and time.
At worst,
- you get the "Operating system not found" or similar error, because default boot order or order of hard drives in a list in the bios is not suitable - you change boot order settings or the list of hard drives so the hard drive you want to boot from is listed first.
- the bios defaults to setting the ram and/or fsb speed slower than it was before and you need to enter a suitable setting for the ram and/or fsb speed manually, so the cpu is then running as fast as it was designed to.

Since you've been messing with bios settings and may have set something wrong, you may need to load bios defaults, then check the boot order settings, which hard and optical drives are listed first in a list, make sure the cpu is running at it's designed speed and if not make ram speed and/or fsb speed corrections, and make no other changes, save settings.

***Apart from the time and disabling the SATA connection and setting the fsb these are all the defaults.***
........

Unplug the case/power supply.
Power off your monitor.
Check all the connections of the wiring to make sure they are all the way onto their pins and into their sockets, especially the main connector from the power supply. The wires close to the mboard going into the main power connector/socket should be more or less perpendicular to the mboard surface rather than at an angle.
Unplug the main power connector and plug it back in.
Make sure the extra mboard power socket other than the main one has the connector and wiring from the PS plugged into it and it's well seated.
Make sure all cards in slots are all the way down in their slots.

***I switched monitors, my graphics card is properly seated. When i ran seatools the was a graphical interface and it looked ok.***

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

***On the tab screen it shows the right amount of memory and my processor.***

If you fiddled with the IDE cables at all......

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittant, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.

***I've tried rounded ide cables and the normal ones.***

".....after disabling the sata controller."

***It checks for Sata devices first, when i first replaced the battery i left this option on.***

You had no reason to do that.


"i've checked the master slave configuration and it hasn't changed."

If you haven't touched the jumpers on the drives, of course that hasn't changed.

"I recently added a 500w psu about 3 months ago..."

There are lots of el-cheapo power supplies out there that you're more likely to have problems with.

What is it's brand and model?

Why did you change the original one?

Do you have a power supply in another computer, or can you borrow a PS from a friend's system, you could temporarily try with this computer?
Your mboard will work fine with as little as a 250 watt capacity PS for testing purposes, depending on what the power requirements of the video card in a slot you have installed are.

***The new PSU was on sale, i kept the old one and have just plugged it back in still nope.***


Report •

#6
August 21, 2009 at 13:04:34
Fixed it, msi emailed me a response.

I had to plug my dvd(2) into the ide primary, hdds(2) into the secondary and disable all boots but my dvd drive then reinstall the pide drivers in the windows recovery console.

I would never of thought of that, thanks for all of everyones help.


Report •

#7
August 21, 2009 at 14:23:17
"***Since i had the motherboard (years) this was the first time***"

Did you get the "Cmos Checksum Error" or similar, then you replaced it?

" ***It was unplug and i was grounded.*** "

Good, if you're sure.

"....did you fiddle with anything other than the battery initially? E.g. unplug something because it was in the way?

***No i had a free gap to the battery and didn't touch anything else.*** "

That's good.

" ***Apart from the time and disabling the SATA connection and setting the fsb these are all the defaults.*** "

"***It checks for Sata devices first, when i first replaced the battery i left this option on.*** "

That's good.
Yes, often, mboards that have SATA controllers default to try booting a SATA drive first, sometimes even if it's only an optical drive, but in many more recent bioses it won't do that unless there's at least one SATA drive connected.


" ***I switched monitors, my graphics card is properly seated. When i ran seatools the was a graphical interface and it looked ok.*** "

If you had video in the first part of booting why would you switch monitors?
Good.

" ***I've tried rounded ide cables and the normal ones.*** "

Then that's probably not your problem, if you were careful.


""See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

***On the tab screen it shows the right amount of memory and my processor.*** "

The ram amount CAN be incorrect when you're having a ram connection problem, but usually that's correct even if you DO have that problem.


" ***The new PSU was on sale, i kept the old one and have just plugged it back in still nope.*** "

I still would like to know the new PS's brand and model.

......................................................................................

" "***Messing around using F8 it clearly stated Windows Xp Home Edition.
When booting in safe mode it reboots itself after mup.sys*** "
....

" Are you hearing the usual one beep most bioses make while booting when the POST has completed successfully ?

***Its Ami and it beeps one short beep*** "

That indicates there is nothing wrong as detected by the POST (Power On Self Test), and the mboard's boot process is probably NOT stalling.

" Does the intial boot process stall forever when you try booting from a hard drive?

***The boot process stops and it reboots itself back to the last known good configuraton screen and repeats this process.*** "


" ***My 2 hdds (master & slave on ide primary) My 2 dvd drives (master & slave on ide secondary) are detected in the first bios screen but it doesn't boot either of them.
I ran dos from floppy, using seatools it checked both hdds and says their fine plus thr space remaining on hdd master means my OS is still there.*** "

WRONG!
The hard drive you have Windows on MUST be booting, or you wouldn't be seeing any messages to do with Windows, whether it is working properly or not!.

It can only boot the other hard drive if it has had an operating system installed on it.
Does it?


CONCLUSIONS

There is nothing wrong with your present boot order settings.

Your hard drive Windows is on IS BOOTING FINE - your problem is WINDOWS is not loading properly!

"When i ran seatools the was a graphical interface and it looked ok."

If both drives passed the Seatools LONG test there's probably nothing wrong with that hard drives or their data cable connections.

You MAY have some data damage on your Windows partition.
The error you're getting can be caused by EITHER
- a ram connection problem,
- OR you do actually have data damage, probably caused when you installed the probably incompatible new module.

If you haven't done this yet, then DO IT! :

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...


If you had not done that, after you do that, try booting the computer normally - if there was a ram connection problem, Windows may boot fine.

If you have done that .....

"When booting in safe mode it reboots itself after mup.sys

That's a standard Windows file, and there is a backup copy of it on the Windows installation, BUT the last file name you see isn't necessarily the one that is causing the computer to reboot. When you boot into Safe mode, you see a whole bunch of lines that list what is loading but the screen stays the same for a while, then you get the Logon screen - Administrator and whoever.
mup.sys just happens to be at the bottom of the list, or near the bottom of the list.

Try pressing F8 repeatedly while booting, and choosing Disable automatic restart on system failure

If that gets you into Windows normally, then you will probably get an error message on a bluescreen the next time it would have normallt re-booted automatically. If you get such ascreen, tell me/us what it says. If it has a Stop: error we usually only need the first part of it before the brackets - 0X000000x. If a file is named - you may need to ckick on details to find that - tell us what it is.

If that gets you into Windows, that setting only works the one time. To set Windows so it does not autoreboot all the time -

Win XP is set by default to automatically reboot when it encounters an unrecoverable error.

To have XP possibly display an error message you can investigate instead of the computer rebooting:

1. Click Start, and then right-click My Computer.
2. Click Properties.
3. Click the Advanced tab, and then click Settings under Startup and Recovery.
4. Under System failure, click on the small box beside Automatically restart to remove the checkmark.
5. Click OK, and then click OK.

If you then get an error message, look at all of it's details.


Whether or not that works....

Do you have a regular full version XP CD of the same version - Home? Or if you don't can your borrow one?



Report •

#8
August 21, 2009 at 14:44:52
"Fixed it, msi emailed me a response.

I had to plug my dvd(2) into the ide primary, hdds(2) into the secondary and disable all boots but my dvd drive then reinstall the pide drivers in the windows recovery console."

We're glad to hear you got it working, BUT.....

HUH??

You assumed things were wrong that weren't wrong previously.See response 7, at least starting at CONCLUSIONS.

XP WAS loading the ide drivers, otherwise you would have gotten no Window related error messages!


Report •


Ask Question