Monitor "out of range"

September 26, 2009 at 13:45:30
Specs: Windows Vista Premium SP2, Core2 Quad Q6600/ 8 GB
I recently (today) replaced a faulty 500W OCZ PSU with a 850W Thermaltake psu and it so far seems to have fixed a crashing problem. Now I have been using a PNY GeForce 9800GT 1GB card with said my ASUS monitor for months with no trouble. However, about 10 hours after replacing my psu, while using my computer, the screen flickered and turned black. After 30 seconds or so, a little message showed saying "OUT OF RANGE". I unplugged my monitor and plugged it back in because I thought that's what you do to solve problems. Anyhow, it turned back on and showed a screen full of narrow vertical colorful bands. I again shut it off and turned it back on but now it no longer shows anything and when i press the power button, it no longer responds.

I've tried restarting my computer to no avail. How do I fix this issue if I only have the one computer (my laptop screen resolution would be "out of range" too...it's 5 years old) and the one "advanced" monitor that won't show anything, much less allow me to reset the resolution or whatever it is the other suggestions I've seen are.

Thank you in advance for you kind suggestions and efforts to help.


See More: Monitor "out of range"

Report •


#1
September 26, 2009 at 15:49:33
" I unplugged my monitor and plugged it back in because I thought that's what you do to solve problems."

Monitors are NOT "hot pluggable" !
NEVER unplug it from the monitor port when the computer is running - doing so can fry the monitor or the video card or both !

Your 9800GT requires a minimum 400 watt PS be on the system. Your original PS should have handed that but it would have been loaded up to 80% of i'ts capacity all the time the computer was running and el-cheapo power supplies may not be able to handle that.

"....showed a screen full of narrow vertical colorful bands"

The bands indicate you probably have a hardware problem with the video card, not a software problem, or a hardware problem with the monitor.

You could try the monitor with another computer to rule that out, but almost always it will work fine with another computer.

If the video seems to work fine for a while after the computer has had a chance to cool to room temp and you then boot it and it works fine , but later on it acts up, the card's chipset may be overheating and/or the fan may have failed on it.
You could try examining your video card while the computer is running to see if the fan on the card, if it has one, is spinning.
You could remove the AC power to the case, and examine the card to see if it's heatsink and/or it's fan if it has one is clogged with mung - lint, dust, etc. - if it's filthy clean it off, but DO NOT use a vacuum cleaner to do that.

You could try checking your cpu heatsink and fan for mung while you're at it.

You could try removing the card from it's slot, cleaning it's contacts with at least a tissue or paper towel, or better still clean them off with methyl or isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol, install the card, make sure it's all the way down in it's slot, fasten it with it's screw, restore AC power, try the card.

If doing those things doesn't get rid of the bands, the 9800GT card is fried.

If your mboard has onboard video, you could try removing the video card when the AC power to the case has been removed, and plugging the monitor into the onboard video port.

""OUT OF RANGE".

That's probably a default message generated by the monitor itself when it isn't getting a video signal, or when the display settings you're using in Windows are not supported by the monitor model. You may get the same message when the video cable from the monitor is not connected to a monitor port at all when the monitor is switched on.

That can indicate
- the monitor is faulty - that's rare - try the monitor with another computer
- the video card is faulty or is overheated or has a poor connection in it's slot
- the video card is okay but the monitor is not - that's rare - try the monitor with another computer
- you're using settings for the monitor in Windows the monitor can't support or can't support without damaging the monitor. - e.g. if you're using Plug and Play Monitor drivers for an LCD monitor, or if you're selecting to bypass video settings your monitor or Plug and Play Monitor mode does not support, you can choose settings your monitor can't display, or that will DAMAGE the monitor if it's LCD.


Report •

#2
September 29, 2009 at 04:39:34
So after I had disconnected my monitor (power and connection to tower) from everything, it just sat there for maybe half an hour (I don't think the time is that important other than that it was more than a couple minutes). Afterwards I reconnected everything and it just worked.

After another 8-10 it flickered off again so I just turned off my computer and waited. It's been four times now. I've tried taking out the video card and putting it back in. I'm getting a new 750W power supply in a couple days so i will take it out and clean it then, but it seemed awfully coincidental to have it happen all of a sudden the day i put in a 850W psu to discover that my 500W psu was faulty. Could it be with the wattage of the PSU? It's probably a stupid idea but I'm just wondering.

As for knowing I have the right drivers and BIOS (what are BIOS?), how do I go about doing that? I have a PNY GeForce 9800GT 1GHz.


Report •

#3
September 29, 2009 at 10:06:42
"...sat there for maybe half an hour .."
"...reconnected everything and it just worked."
"After another 8-10 it flickered off again "

Obviously the card is malfunctioning after it, and/or the computer in general, has warmed up some.

"I've tried taking out the video card and putting it back in."

If you have checked out and tried everything I mentioned in response 1 regarding the card and the cpu fan and heatsink and they're OK, your card is probably damaged. If you have doubts about the fan on the card, you could try replacing that.

Otherwise, the only other thing I can think of that might cause your problem is a poor connection in your ram slots.
See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...
...

" ,,,,it seemed awfully coincidental to have it happen all of a sudden the day i put in a 850W psu to discover that my 500W psu was faulty. "

Did you remove the AC power to the case/PS at ALL times?

ATX power supplies are always powering ATX mboards in some places, including some contacts in the ram and card slots, even when the computer is not running, as long as the PS is connected to the mboard, the switch on the PS is on if it has a switch, and the PS is receiving live AC power.
You should ALWAYS disconnect the AC power to the case/PS whenever you make any changes to connections inside the case or install or remove components inside the case, including simply connection power to the drives.
If you didn't do that at ANY point, you can easily damage anything connected to the mboard or to the PS, and/or the PS.

If the video card was not all the way down in it's slot at any time when the computer was running, or possibly even if it wasn't running if the PS had live AC power, the card could have been damaged.

This alone could have damaged the card...
" I unplugged my monitor and plugged it back in because I thought that's what you do to solve problems."
.......

"Could it be with the wattage of the PSU"

Certainly not regarding the Thermaltake 850 watt PS.

The 9800GT video card requiring a minimum 400 watt PS be on the system would have loaded the 500 watt OCZ PS to as much as 80% , or more, of it's capacity, all the time - it should have been able to handle that.
A look on the web finds the OCZ PSs have a decent 3 year warranty and a decent reputation .
However, there is always a percentage of PSs that malfunction for whatever reason - it's just a lot less likely to happen if it's a good quality PS.

Are you sure it's a 9800GT?
e.g. a 9800GTX chipset requires a minimum 450 watt PS be on the system, and that would have loaded the 500 watt PS to as much as 90%, or more, all the time.
......

"As for knowing I have the right drivers and BIOS (what are BIOS?), how do I go about doing that?"

If the video works ok when the computer has had a chance to cool, your problem has got absolutely nothing to do with drivers or the bios version.
Drivers cannot normally cause your symptoms in any case - it sounds like your problem is a hardware problem, not a software problem, in any case. If once the video malfunctions it doesn't work properly BEFORE Windows starts to load when you try booting or re-booting the computer, it can't possibly be caused by anything on the hard drive.
If the video card worked fine previously with the present bios version, the problem cannot have been caused by the bios version.
Flashing the bios is NOT a cure-all !
NEVER flash the bios unless you find specific info such as in release notes where you download bios updates, or in cpu support info for the model, that it will cure the exact problem you're having.


Report •

Related Solutions


Ask Question