Solved Monitor not working with mother board output.

July 8, 2011 at 21:47:21
Specs: Windows 7, core 2 duo / 2GB
Hello,
I think I am experiencing a graphic card problem. So, I unplugged the monitor's connector cable from the graphic card's port and plugged it to the port provided on the mother board. After I turned the PC on, I found that the monitor was not receiving any signal--the indicator light on the screen was blinking. Should the graphic card be removed before connecting the monitor's cable directly to motherboard?

Thanks,
Shashank


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✔ Best Answer
July 10, 2011 at 08:17:42
"I noticed a capacitor which has bulged. Was this capacitor a reason to cause sudden freeze and artifacts? "

When it's top is not flat, it's failing.
Failing or failed capacitors can cause any sort of symptoms.

Is that on the mboard or on the video card ?
(A video adapter built into the mboard IS NOT A VIDEO CARD ! )
If it's only on the video card, replace it, DO NOT get the exact same card !

You can replace defective capacitors yourself, but
- if the board no longer works properly at all, replacing the capacitor may not cure the problem. You have the best chance of success if you replace it BEFORE it has failed completely, while the board is malfunctioning but is still working.
- it's not a job most people have the proper tools for
- you must be very careful
- you should replace ALL the capacitors made by the same brand as the one that has failed, in your case, that has bulged, at least the ones that have the same capacitance, because any of them that haven't already failed will likely fail in the future. (It's recommended you replace all capacitors of the same brand that failed, 330uf or higher - it's extremely unlikely capacitors with less capacity will fail.)
- it is often difficult or impossible to get suitable better quality (reliable brand, low ESR) capacitors meant to be used on mboards from local suppliers
- if you need to replace more than a few capacitors, it costs too much to buy them locally.

Most people just replace the mboard with one that is NOT the same make and model.

E.g.
I managed to fix

- a Shuttle mboard that had the problem, but I needed to replace only two capacitors - the only ones of that brand -

- a board for an LG LCD monitor that had the problem, but I needed to replace only two capacitors

In both cases the capacitors were in a location where it wasn't critical whether the solder blobs I made were larger than they originally were, and the only local supplier who had suitable better quality capacitors is a guy who used to replace capacitors on mboards..

You can have any sort of symptoms.

For the Shuttle mboard.....
- the mboard would not boot all the way every time - it happened more frequently as time went by - no change when I connected a different power switch .The ram passed diagnostics tests

- the onboard video worked fine when it's specific drivers were NOT loaded, but when you loaded the specific drivers, the computer would black screen and reboot shortly after Windows loaded -- if you booted into Safe mode or Enable VGA mode when those were loaded there was no problem

- connecting a different known good power supply didn't help

- I found a thread on forum about the same mboard model that had exactly the same symptoms, that mentioned the two culprit capacitors.

Both had bulged tops.

For the LG LCD monitor
- for a long time it behaved as if there was a problem with the power switch or it's circuit . You sometimes had no video, when you booted, or after the screen saver kicked in, the blank screen had appeared, and you attempted to wake up the computer - but if you pressed the monitor power button off/on the video would be fine for a while.
- then when you pressed the power button off/on the video would briefly appear then disappear
- shortly after that, no video no matter what you did.

- one capacitor had a bulged top and evidence it had leaked, I also replaced an identical one.

I have four mboards that have at least two capacitors that have failed. All of them still start up but no longer boot all the way, all or most of them don't even beep. It would be much more difficult to replace most of the capacitors of the same brand that had failed on those, because in many places, it IS critical whether the solder blobs I make are larger than they originally were.

Electrolytic capacitors have a finite lifespan and capacitors that were not improperly made and are not a known to be less reliable brand can also fail eventually. That applies to only one of the four mboards - it worked fine for ten years +. The other three all have improperly made, known to be less reliable brands of capacitors.

I have a failing Sparkle power supply that has two obvious failing capacitors and more of them of the same brand - I'm not going to fix that unless I can get the proper capacitors really cheaply. You can hear one of them leaking (making a gas) even when the computer is not running when it has AC power to it.

I have or have seen several dead power supplies that have one or more failing or failed capacitors - for one of them, one capacitor exploded when I happened to be near it . It's board has a zapped (vaporized) circuit trace .
......

The following also applies to any board that has electrolytic capacitors on it.
E.g. this is a frequent reason for power supply failure.

Some mboards develop this problem - electrolytic capacitors were installed on them that were not properly made, and they fail eventually - the mboard manufacturer didn't know they were improperly made at the time the mboard was made.

Open up your case and examine the mboard to see if you have bad capacitors, and/or other findable signs of mboard damage .

What to look for, mboard symptoms, example pictures:
http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Home page that site
- what the problem is caused by
- he says there are STILL bad capacitors on more recent mboards.
http://www.badcaps.net/

- links on left to economical available premade or custom capacitor kits, and/or you can ship the mboard to him and he will replace the capacitors for a flat fee (including the capacitors) plus shipping (North America only).

NOTE - he can ship the capacitors he has to anywhere in the world, except he may no longer ship to CANADA.

If you want more info about what is involved if you replace the capacitors yourself, there is a link to a very good Forum on the badcaps web site.

Pictures of blown capacitors, other components, power supplies, fried Athlon cpus, etc.:
http://www.halfdone.com/Personal/Jo...



#1
July 8, 2011 at 22:09:26
Remove the v-card first before using onboard video(unplug the power cord first). Post the system specs

We can not fight new wars with old weapons, let he who desires peace prepare for war - PROPHET.


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#2
July 9, 2011 at 00:51:17
Will do it.. Thanks!

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#3
July 10, 2011 at 04:01:55
Hey Kuwese, thanks! I have removed the graphic card - Nvidia 8400GS-512MB.
I noticed a capacitor which has bulged. Was this capacitor a reason to cause sudden freeze and artifacts? The artifacts looked like "bus type" artifacts shown in the link here http://www.playtool.com/pages/artif...

Thanks


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Related Solutions

#4
July 10, 2011 at 08:17:42
✔ Best Answer
"I noticed a capacitor which has bulged. Was this capacitor a reason to cause sudden freeze and artifacts? "

When it's top is not flat, it's failing.
Failing or failed capacitors can cause any sort of symptoms.

Is that on the mboard or on the video card ?
(A video adapter built into the mboard IS NOT A VIDEO CARD ! )
If it's only on the video card, replace it, DO NOT get the exact same card !

You can replace defective capacitors yourself, but
- if the board no longer works properly at all, replacing the capacitor may not cure the problem. You have the best chance of success if you replace it BEFORE it has failed completely, while the board is malfunctioning but is still working.
- it's not a job most people have the proper tools for
- you must be very careful
- you should replace ALL the capacitors made by the same brand as the one that has failed, in your case, that has bulged, at least the ones that have the same capacitance, because any of them that haven't already failed will likely fail in the future. (It's recommended you replace all capacitors of the same brand that failed, 330uf or higher - it's extremely unlikely capacitors with less capacity will fail.)
- it is often difficult or impossible to get suitable better quality (reliable brand, low ESR) capacitors meant to be used on mboards from local suppliers
- if you need to replace more than a few capacitors, it costs too much to buy them locally.

Most people just replace the mboard with one that is NOT the same make and model.

E.g.
I managed to fix

- a Shuttle mboard that had the problem, but I needed to replace only two capacitors - the only ones of that brand -

- a board for an LG LCD monitor that had the problem, but I needed to replace only two capacitors

In both cases the capacitors were in a location where it wasn't critical whether the solder blobs I made were larger than they originally were, and the only local supplier who had suitable better quality capacitors is a guy who used to replace capacitors on mboards..

You can have any sort of symptoms.

For the Shuttle mboard.....
- the mboard would not boot all the way every time - it happened more frequently as time went by - no change when I connected a different power switch .The ram passed diagnostics tests

- the onboard video worked fine when it's specific drivers were NOT loaded, but when you loaded the specific drivers, the computer would black screen and reboot shortly after Windows loaded -- if you booted into Safe mode or Enable VGA mode when those were loaded there was no problem

- connecting a different known good power supply didn't help

- I found a thread on forum about the same mboard model that had exactly the same symptoms, that mentioned the two culprit capacitors.

Both had bulged tops.

For the LG LCD monitor
- for a long time it behaved as if there was a problem with the power switch or it's circuit . You sometimes had no video, when you booted, or after the screen saver kicked in, the blank screen had appeared, and you attempted to wake up the computer - but if you pressed the monitor power button off/on the video would be fine for a while.
- then when you pressed the power button off/on the video would briefly appear then disappear
- shortly after that, no video no matter what you did.

- one capacitor had a bulged top and evidence it had leaked, I also replaced an identical one.

I have four mboards that have at least two capacitors that have failed. All of them still start up but no longer boot all the way, all or most of them don't even beep. It would be much more difficult to replace most of the capacitors of the same brand that had failed on those, because in many places, it IS critical whether the solder blobs I make are larger than they originally were.

Electrolytic capacitors have a finite lifespan and capacitors that were not improperly made and are not a known to be less reliable brand can also fail eventually. That applies to only one of the four mboards - it worked fine for ten years +. The other three all have improperly made, known to be less reliable brands of capacitors.

I have a failing Sparkle power supply that has two obvious failing capacitors and more of them of the same brand - I'm not going to fix that unless I can get the proper capacitors really cheaply. You can hear one of them leaking (making a gas) even when the computer is not running when it has AC power to it.

I have or have seen several dead power supplies that have one or more failing or failed capacitors - for one of them, one capacitor exploded when I happened to be near it . It's board has a zapped (vaporized) circuit trace .
......

The following also applies to any board that has electrolytic capacitors on it.
E.g. this is a frequent reason for power supply failure.

Some mboards develop this problem - electrolytic capacitors were installed on them that were not properly made, and they fail eventually - the mboard manufacturer didn't know they were improperly made at the time the mboard was made.

Open up your case and examine the mboard to see if you have bad capacitors, and/or other findable signs of mboard damage .

What to look for, mboard symptoms, example pictures:
http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Home page that site
- what the problem is caused by
- he says there are STILL bad capacitors on more recent mboards.
http://www.badcaps.net/

- links on left to economical available premade or custom capacitor kits, and/or you can ship the mboard to him and he will replace the capacitors for a flat fee (including the capacitors) plus shipping (North America only).

NOTE - he can ship the capacitors he has to anywhere in the world, except he may no longer ship to CANADA.

If you want more info about what is involved if you replace the capacitors yourself, there is a link to a very good Forum on the badcaps web site.

Pictures of blown capacitors, other components, power supplies, fried Athlon cpus, etc.:
http://www.halfdone.com/Personal/Jo...


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#5
July 10, 2011 at 21:11:50
Thanks TubesAndWires ! The capacitor is on the Nvidia 8400 GS PCI graphic card. The top face of this capacitor has bulged out just like you've mentioned above. But, ever since I've removed the graphic card, I am not experiencing any issues. The system appears to be stable. I'm yet to check any faults on the mother board. I'm not willing to take the risk of replacing the capacitors by myself. Instead, I'm planning to give it for service at the shop where I bought it from.

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