monitor not working after enable pci

January 1, 2011 at 11:05:51
Specs: Windows 7 Home Premium, 4gb
hey folks... i have an issue i need help with.
i just purchased a barebone kit and set it up. i installed a fresh copy of windows 7 (not pirate) and all was well. i then installed/updated my motherboard with the disc that came with it.
next, i tried installing my video card. so is shut down the power and physically installed the video card, then i booted it up expecting to install the software. (the vid card is the msi 450gts oc btw)
well, the mother board never recognized the vid card...so i went into device manager and uninstalled the on board graphics, tried rebooting and installing the msi vid card and that didn't work...
i read somewhere to go into the bios and disable the on board graphics, save and exit...
after doing this, my computer rebooted but not i don't see anything on the screen... i tried hooking up the monitor directly to the graphics card but that doesn't work either...
so as it is right now i don't have a monitor to see what i'm doing to undo the things or even troubleshoot... i'm not sure where to go from here seeing that i can't see anything :S
can anyone suggest anything for me??
thanks

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#1
January 1, 2011 at 11:10:15
btw, the monitor works when i hook it up to another pc..
the msi vid card was seated properly just wasn't being recognized...
i just need to be able to see what im doing once again...

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#2
January 1, 2011 at 11:21:51
Try removing the card, then remove the mobo battery for a few seconds and reinstall it. Then boot up without the card in and see if you have onboard back again.

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#3
January 1, 2011 at 11:26:49
"i tried hooking up the monitor directly to the graphics card but that doesn't work either..."

This statement has me confused. When you install a video card, your are supposed to connect the monitor to the video card, otherwise the card is useless. Why didn't you do that right from the start? Apparently you went about it the installation all wrong. There was no reason to mess with Device Manager. All you needed to do was uninstall the onbard video drivers using Add/Remove (or whatever it's called in Win7), then shutdown. The new card should have been installed in the PCIe x16 slot & the aux 6-pin PCIe plug connected to the rear of the card. The monitor cable should have been connected to the new card & the system powered on. The video card should work immediately & you should have gone into the BIOS to disable all settings related to the onboard (disable, shared memory, initial display). Once the BIOS setting are saved, reboot into Windows & install the nVidia drivers.

Since the GTS 450 requires the 6-pin plug, you need to have a decent power supply with plenty of amps on the +12v rail. The power supplies included in barebones kits are usually cheap garbage. What is the make/model, wattage & amperage specs of the one you have?


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Related Solutions

#4
January 1, 2011 at 11:27:00
just gave it a shot and nope, nothing...
everything worked fine before trying to install the msi vid card and disabling the on board graphics from the bios...

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#5
January 1, 2011 at 11:32:58
mick-
initially i forgot to put the monitor cable on the graphics card but i eventually realized this error and placed it on the back on the msi vid card. at this point it didn't show anything even after a reboot...
also, the msi vid card has a huge fan mounted, i have not observed it spinning at all...
the psu is: OCZ ModXStream Pro 700W ATX12V V2.2 / EPS12V SLI Certified CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS Certified Modular Active PFC Power Supply compatible with core i7 (Model:OCZ700MXSP)

this barebone kit can be seen here :http://www.newegg.ca/Product/ComboBundleDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.569871

i dont mind doing a format because i have NOTHING on this hard drive...brand new..


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#6
January 1, 2011 at 11:41:40
Did you unplug the cord to the case, or otherwise switch off the AC power to the case, at ALL times when you were plugging in or unplugging anything that plugs into the mboard ? If you didn't do that when you were plugging in or unplugging the video card, you may have damaged the video card !

What is the specific model of your mboard ?

Some fairly recent and new mboards that have onboard video have a Hybrid video feature - both the onboard video and certain video chipsets on a video card will be enabled at the same time by default when you install a video card in a PCI-E X16 slot.
If you install a video card in a mboard slot that has a video chipset that is NOT compatible with that feature, you will NOT get video from the video card by default, and the onboard video is still producing video.
In that case, you need to change some settings in the bios - we need to know the specific mboard you have in order to be able to tell you what you need to change.

Some AMD and NVidia main chipset mboards have the Hybrid video feature, in which case Hybrid Crossfire or Hybrid SLI is always mentioned in it's specs, and some Intel main chipsets also have that feature - they call it something else - Hybrid Multi-monitor Support.
If you mboard does not have onboard video, or if it does but the mboard does not have that Hybrid video feature, then there is NO setting you can change in the bios that disables the onboard video - that's done automatically by the bios when you install a video card in a PCI-E X16 slot (if the card is not damaged, is hooked up correctly, and is all the way down in it's slot).
.........

If the onboard video adapter shows up in Device Manager, then the mboards bios hasn't disabled it.
The fact that it shows up there indicates you have a mboard with the Hybrid video feature, and/or the mboard is not detecting the video card at all, for whatever reason.

It doesn't work to un-install the onboard video adapter in Device Manager if it shows up there - you must Disable it, otherwise it is just detected again the next time you boot the computer.
......

If the video card has one or two power sockets on it, you must connect a wiring connector from the power supply to that (those) socket(s) that fills the socket(s).
If your power supply does not have the necessary connector(s) on it's wiring, if the video card did not come with (a) suitable wiring / connector adapter(s), you must buy (a) suitable wiring /connector adapter(s) and connect it(them) to the power supply and the card.
.......

Your power supply must have at least the minimum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD ! )
If that info is not in the ad for the video card, you can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements. Some power supplies have two or more +12v ratings - in that case, add those ratings to determine the total +12v current capacity.

If you're a gamer...
In most if not all cases, the max capacity rating of the PS is an intermittent rating. It's recommended that you do not load your PS to any more that 80% of that rating if you are going to be using something that puts a constant load on it, such as playing a recent game for hours on end. In that case, you multiply the min capacity stated for the system with the particular video chipset on the card by 1.25 to find the min. capacity of the PS you should get.

If you need to get a PS with more capacity, you can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
.........



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#7
January 1, 2011 at 11:49:04
You don't have to format. Your problem has nothing to do with the OS or hard drive. It's strictly hardware related. You don't need a hard drive to get a display on the monitor. Do you have the 6-pin plug connected to the video card??

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#8
January 1, 2011 at 12:44:28
ok so i reset the cmos by removing the battery on the mobo for a few mins and replacing it...i was then able to get the defaut bios up and running and now the monitor is connected again....i'll keep u guys updated on my progress and my mistakes so the next guy/gal won't make them!! thanks for all the prompt responses guys!

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#9
January 1, 2011 at 12:52:30
What is the specific model of your mboard ?

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#10
January 2, 2011 at 16:38:21
the MOBO is ASUS M4A88T-V EVO/USB3..
so i was able to get the bios fixed after resetting the cmos (pulling out the battery like thing on the mobo and replacing it after a min or so)...
then i realized i had to update my genuine windows 7 prior to installing drivers for mobo... my DVDrom actually froze in the middle of the installation because microsoft thought it was a pirate copy initially...
when all this cleared up and i was sure my mobo's drivers were updated i installed the video card....ok so these new video cards (the last video card i installed was a 256mb card...yes, the mobo had sufficient power to boot up those cards) ...and THAT was my problem...
be sure to power up the card with a powersupply lead directly from the PSU. GEEZ! thats ALL i needed to do...damn, all that time for that minor easy step...
that step wasn't included anywhere on the manuals that came with it, as a matter of fact, i noticed that by watching a DIY youtube video!!
Anyways, after a little cuss I hooked it up and tahdahhh...works amazing!
thanks for the prompt responses though guys, these forum communities rock!!

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#11
January 2, 2011 at 17:45:26
try plugging it onto you onboard again and then change up the settings i the bios and then save exit and then reattach your x16

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#12
January 3, 2011 at 17:57:20
"ASUS M4A88T-V EVO/USB3"

supports Hybrid CrossfireX video

As I said above "...Hybrid video feature - both the onboard video and certain video chipsets on a video card will be enabled at the same time by default when you install a video card in a PCI-E X16 slot.
If you install a video card in a mboard slot that has a video chipset that is NOT compatible with that feature, you will NOT get video from the video card by default, and the onboard video is still producing video.
In that case, you need to change some settings in the bios - ...."

Update - with the monitor connected to the onboard video....

In your bios Setup....

Advanced -
Chipset -

Internal Graphics -

Primary Video Controller -

This info is missing from the mboard manual for your model that I looked at

* GFX0: video controller in a PCI-E x16 slot
* GPP: video controller in a PCI-E x1 slot
* IGFX: onboard (built into the mboard) video controller
* PCI: video controller in a PCI slot

GFX0 GPP IGFX PCI - according to the manual that's the default setting.

If you're using a PCI-E X16 video card, that's the setting you want.

below that -

Internal Graphics Mode - set that to DISABLED !

If you want the card in the slot to work, that MUST be set to disabled if the card in the PCI-E X16 or PCI-E X1 slot has a video chipset is NOT compatible with the Hybrid CrossfireX feature - e.g. ALL NVidia video chipset cards, and MOST ATI / AMD video chipset cards are NOT Hybrid CrossfireX compatible.

PCI-E X1 cards can also be used in PCI-E X4, PCI-E X 8, and PCI-E X 16 slots.

Update - Save bios settings.

When the computer reboots, hold the power button in until the mboard shuts off.

Connect the monitor to the video port on the card in the slot.

Boot the computer.

You will have video from the card
......

I'm assuming, of course, that you do have the proper power connector(s) from the power supply connected to the socket(s) on the card, the card is all the way down it it's slot, and that the card is not damaged.



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#13
July 31, 2011 at 20:42:34
hi
am using msig31-p21 model first i used 512 mb nivida graphic card .then i buyed new 1gb nividia graphic card and i attached to mother board when i power on my pc it was not coming display.i changed bios settings of pci enabled but i cant reslove my problem so plzzzzzzzzzz help me what should i do now

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#14
July 31, 2011 at 21:25:29
adityavv369

You DO NOT have the same problem as the guy who started this Topic.
His mboard is MUCH newer than yours.

There is no setting in the bios of your mboard that will actually disable the onboard video.
Installing a PCI-E X16 video card in the PCI-E X16 slot automatically causes the bios to disable the onboard video.

There is no such model as MSI G31-P21

It's MSI G31TM-P21

G31TM-P21 (home support page)
http://us.msi.com/product/mb/G31TM-...
......

A frequent mistake people are making these days is they have installed a video card their power supply hasn't got enough capacity to support.

Your power supply must have at least the minumum capacity required to support a system with the graphics card you are using installed, or the max graphics card you might install in the future.
(Onboard video - video built into the mboard - IS NOT A CARD!)
You can go to the video card maker's web site and look up the specs for the model - often under system requirements - the minimum PS wattage, and, more important, the minimum amperage the PS must supply at 12v is stated. If you don't find that, any card with the same video chipset including any letters after the model number has very similar minimum PS requirements.

If the power supply does not have enough capacity, either -

- the mboard will not boot

- OR - the video card often works fine at first anyway, but the PS is overloaded 100% of the time the computer is running and the PS is damaged and will eventually fail completely.
........

Which video card in a mboard slot are you trying to use ?

What is the (max combined output) wattage capacity of your power supply ?
That's on the label on the power supply.
........

If you need to get a PS with more capacity, you can usually replace it with any decent standard sized standard ATX PS.

Standard (PS/2) power supply size - 86mm high, 150mm wide, 140mm deep, or 3 3/8" h x 5 7/8" w x 5 1/2" d , or very close to that, though the depth can be more or less for some PSs.

Don't buy an el-cheapo PS.
See response 3 in this:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...


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