Solved microphone humming when plugged in

February 26, 2017 at 14:41:18
Specs: win 10 64 bit, AMD fx8300/8gb ddr3 1600mhz
Hi,my soundcard is acting up Realtek HD Audio/Realtek ALC892, It was all fine but then a week later wanted to use discord and my friend told me there is a noise.I upped the playback volume and there it was a bad humming. Unplugged plugged back in,nothing. Used a different microphone,same thing. I used a different jack but it does the same. Reinstalled the driver which did not help either. Wherever i plug int whatever microphone the humming starts. It still records if i shout hard enough but the noise is to bad to be useful. I have to mention that i still use it,there are no issues on the outputs. All the speakers work fine. Only the microhpone is affected. I also checked to not be a power surge from the ground(the pc not being grounded). It is fine. I dont know what to do never encountered this problem. Can only the mic input brake ?

This is how it manifests :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQG...


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✔ Best Answer
February 27, 2017 at 05:33:57
It sounds like a 50-60 Hz hum . Unfortunately many problems cause this to be picked up but I think the card itself is high on the list. It's possible that the microphone grounding is not making contact somewhere inside the computer, leaving the cable screen ungrounded. Is it worse if you hold the microphone cable?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks



#1
February 26, 2017 at 15:26:16
Are you quite sure the microphone itself is turned up enough?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
February 26, 2017 at 15:40:24
My experience with Realtek HD "Audio Manager" software is that you need to actually program the jack, not just plug it in. You click on the color jack in the Manager that you are using and select what you have connected to it. The jacks are programmable. There are also Device Advanced Settings.

If you connect a mic to a jack that was set for speakers I think you will get a hum.


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#3
February 26, 2017 at 20:55:58
I also think it is programming the jack.
Also see if the Mic input volume is too high an picking up background noise and over amplifying it to the hum.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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Related Solutions

#4
February 26, 2017 at 23:39:18
The microphone is plugged into the correct jack. It is set to microphone. I actually have to set the outputs manually from regedit because the driver doesn't work properly on 64 but operating systems. It worked fine until now. The volume is set properly not to high not to low as it should be. Tried higher and lower too it does not work. This is not background noise amplified. I tried noise cancelation too. No difference. It does sound like a massive power surge but it is not that. Is it possible that something is fried on the input side and that causes the noise ?

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#5
February 27, 2017 at 05:33:57
✔ Best Answer
It sounds like a 50-60 Hz hum . Unfortunately many problems cause this to be picked up but I think the card itself is high on the list. It's possible that the microphone grounding is not making contact somewhere inside the computer, leaving the cable screen ungrounded. Is it worse if you hold the microphone cable?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
February 27, 2017 at 08:55:48
Not to be argumentative but I don't think you actually have the jack set for the mic. You need to physically connect the mic, then set that jack to mic, then click on the jack icon to actually set it.

If you are trying to use reference drivers from Realtek that may be the problem.

Post the full computer model or if custom built, the full motherboard model number.


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#7
February 27, 2017 at 13:43:55
If this is the built in sound circuit, there are really inexpensive sound cards that you can purchase that will completely work around it. Make sure that you disable the onboard sound in BIOS as well as removing old driver and installing the new driver for the new card.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
March 1, 2017 at 06:48:36
Hi. I am back with the answers. There has been a miracle. This is exactly what i have done. Nothing. I took the headset to test it in a different computer. The moment i plugged it in it started humming but i noticed that it wasn't that bad and it was improving somehow having less hum. I unplugged it plugged it back in a couple of times and it just started working,no humm. I cam back to my PC plugged it in a it just worked like before. I have changed literally nothing in the settings,just plugged it in and it worked like before which means my settings were fine to all those who said i plugged it wrong and stuff.(i don't really understand it either) A while later i tried it again upping the playback volume and started hearing really faintly the hum. Now when i touch the mic it hums louder the harder i squeeze the mic or the wire the louder the humming gets until i touch the computer and ground myself,it almost goes away completely. Never encountered a hum this loud because of a ground issue that is why i thought to be something else. I have no idea where the issue is yet. It can be from the wall,power cord,power supply,motherboard,the circuit or the jacks are just to used but i know for sure it is a ground issue now. Haven't had the time to check all the above but it works now. I just wanted to let you know the issue had been kinda resolved and thanks for the help.

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#9
March 1, 2017 at 08:03:56
A very common problem is cord damage at one end or the other because of flexing. Same thing happens on headphones. Often the issue will come and go when you move the cord in those places. Can sometimes be repaired by cutting back if you have the skill and patience. At least we know for certain it is the mike rather than the computer.

The hum is picked up from the domestic power field and injected by you. In the valve days (high impedance) this was often used as a quick audio test - touch and get the big buzzing sound. When you touch ground then you no longer inject the signal.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
March 1, 2017 at 09:07:06
Derek,

My understanding of electronics is patchy. How antennae work
is especially mysterious to me. Are you saying that in this case
the person's body might be acting as an antenna, picking up the
extremely low frequency radio waves put out by power wires, and
somehow transferring the signal into the microphone cable?
Can you explain this any further? What makes this a problem in
some situations but not others? Obviously it isn't something that
happens all the time. But there have been two or three occasions
in just the last couple of weeks that I've heard similar hum in live
network TV. I've had the same kind of thing several times in the
past, and could never pinpoint the cause with any certainty, even
whether it was a poor connection or an incorrect setting.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#11
March 1, 2017 at 10:11:07
Yes, your first paragraph is exactly right. Picking up this interference becomes a problem when there is poor grounding or screening. It is exacerbated when you place yourself in a position to aid this condition, such as touching the input of an amplifier (including computer audio inputs). With modern low impedance equipment it is not so severe but it still happens.

There is some discussion here:
http://electronics.stackexchange.co...
Most of it is about right except the bit about "electrical impulses that control your muscles".

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#12
March 1, 2017 at 13:24:51
> Picking up this interference becomes a problem when there is
> poor grounding or screening.

Can you explain that a bit more? Does grounding somehow prevent
the problem? Does it somehow mask the problem? Or what?

> It is exacerbated when you place yourself in a position to aid this
> condition, such as touching the input of an amplifier (including
> computer audio inputs).

What if I'm only touching the chassis, or insulated wires? That
has made a difference in many situations.

> With modern low impedance equipment it is not so severe but it
> still happens.

Not really knowing anything about it, I'd think lower impedence
would mean higher sensitivity, thus greater susceptibility to
interference from extraneous sources. Apparently not?

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#13
March 1, 2017 at 14:07:45
Firstly I must be careful with my use of the word grounding. In this content I am referring to the common connection to which any shielding is connected. It does not necessarily mean a connection to "true ground" - many electronic devices these days are not connected to ground itself at all.

When you touch this common connection it is effectively causing your body to be at zero potential (Volts) compared to the so called "live" input signal connection. You therefore convey little or nothing to the device - so no hum. The chassis is usually part of this "common connection" so touching that would do the same. Touching insulated wires should only cause hum to be induced if the wires are unscreened, or the screening is faulty.

The impedance thing is all a matter of relativity (and I don't mean that Einstein's stuff LOL). Your body has quite a high impedance compared to the input characteristics of modern electronic devices, which partly nullifies your body's pickup capabilities. The low input impedance partially "shorts out your body". By contrast when you touch a high impedance input it causes less change to the overall impedance situation so more interference can get through.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#14
March 1, 2017 at 20:52:07
I was thinking also that the plugging in and out repeatedly may have burnished the contact surfaces on the plug and jack reducing resistance and interference.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#15
March 2, 2017 at 03:36:29
Jeff Root
One more thing:
"I'd think lower impedance would mean higher sensitivity"
The impedance is not something between the input socket and the outside world (in series), it is "across" the input connections (in parallel). The combination of the input impedance and someone touching the signal wire will therefore be less than the lowest of the two. Low impedance will result in a greater voltage drop to the interference.

Fingers
Yes, I've also run into what you describe in #14 but the symptoms given in the link are the classical manifestation of mains hum.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#16
March 2, 2017 at 18:13:34
Derek
I only mentioned it since he found that unplugging and replugging it on the second machine improved it and then it worked better in the original machine.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#17
March 2, 2017 at 18:27:26
Yes Fingers - understood. Burnishing the connection to the shield could be a possible fix.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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