Message: USB Device Can Perform Faster?

Acer / Aspire 5542
August 7, 2011 at 16:39:10
Specs: Windows 7, 2.2 GHz / 3838 MB


Hi there, I;m new to the forums (this being my first post) and hoping you can help me. So please bear with me, I've written quite abit in detail about my question (hehe, that's an understatement) and I appreciate your patience as I'm not much of a techie.

I have an Acer Aspire 5542-5462 laptop (◦CPU/Ram: 2.2 GHz / 3838 MB) w/ Windows 7 and the product details indicates I have four 2.0 USB ports (2 on the right side, 2 on the left). Today I connected my 1TB external "SimpleDrive" hard drive in order to do a backup which I'd done previously but my last one was afew months ago and this time got the same "This Device Can Perform Faster - Your USB Mass Storage Device can perform faster if plugged into a hi-speed port" message as others have. This is the first time I've received this message.

Below that is a window with the heading "The hubs shown in BOLD type have free ports that can support the HI-SPEED USB device." and in the window it shows 2 separate "Standard Enhanced PCI to USB Host Controller" and under each it shows a sub-heading "USB Root Hub #6 ports# in BOLD TYPE. Under the 1st USB Root Hub it reflects all 6 as being "Unused Port" and under the 2nd USB Root Hub it reflects all but the 5th of 6 as being "Unused Port" and the 5th as "USB Composite Device".

I went online to find out about the USB "This Device Can Perform Faster" message and what it meant, along with solutions. I've tried the following:


-Went into the "Device Manager" window and the "Universal Serial Bus controllers" sub-menu which reflects, in order, 2 "Standard Enhanced PCI to USB Host Controller", 4 "Standard OpenHCD USB Host Controller", 2 "USB Composite Device", 1 "USB Mass Storage Device" and finally 6 "USB Root Hub".

Per online instructions I right-clicked on each one and used the "Update Driver Software" #via a "Search online for updates" option# and received a "The best driver software for your device is already installed; Windows has determined the driver software for your device is up to date" for each and every one.

-Secondly per online suggestions I checked each USB Root Hub and all reflected as running at "full-speed" instead of the optimum "hi-speed" #which was indicated as to what should be showing if using a true 2.0 USB port#.

So basically what I'm asking is if I have the current drivers already installed and my laptop's 4 USB ports are all supposed to support 2.0, then why aren't those USB Root Hubs running at HI-SPEED instead of the slower full-speed? Is there something I've missed? Or is there nothing wrong at all? My previous backups have taken upwards of 12+ hours to complete and I want to make sure that I'm using the fastest means possible. Thanks very much in advance for any help! Best regards,

Kurt


See More: Message: USB Device Can Perform Faster?

Report •

#1
August 7, 2011 at 16:53:39
One thing that is possible is that the external drive you bought was an USB 3.0. They do make flash drives and such that run on USB 3.0. I don't think anything is wrong, because USB 2.0's speed is only about 36 Megabits per second, or known also as 512 Kilobytes per second, explaining your slow speed.

Ask and Answer. The way of learning.
But first ask the right way.


Report •

#2
August 7, 2011 at 17:32:22
Thanks for the quick response, much appreciated :D As for my external drive I purchased it in January of last year and the product description is "Hitachi SimpleDrive 1TB Turbo USB 2.0 External Hard Drive", so I don't think it's a USB 3.0 (unlesss Hitachi was real sneaky and upgraded it without telling..haha..). Thanks for taking the time to post, I just wish my laptop was giving me less confusing & contradicting info..LOL.. Best,

Kurt


Report •

#3
August 7, 2011 at 18:19:12
List all other USB devices that are shown in Device Manager.

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
August 7, 2011 at 18:26:34
""This Device Can Perform Faster - Your USB Mass Storage Device can perform faster if plugged into a hi-speed port" message ..."

You only get that or a similar message
- if the USB device does indicate to Windows that it performs better if plugged into a hi-speed USB port (you'll never get that message when you plug in something that is not required for, such as a keyboard or a corded mouse)
- and if the mboard DOES support USB 2.0 or greater specs, if Windows has not been informed that the mboard's main chipset supports at least USB 2.0 specs.

If you have installed Windows from scratch, the main chipset drivers for the mboard must be installed after Setup has finished in order for Windows to be informed that the mboard's main chipset supports at least USB 2.0 specs and for Windows to install that USB 2.0 or greater support. Windows 7 and Vista does not necessarily detect that automatically with what's built into them; XP (SP1 or greater is required to support USB 2.0 devices) and 2000 (SP4 or greater is required to support USB 2.0 devices) never detect that automatically with what's built into them.

"List all other USB devices that are shown in Device Manager."

If Windows has installed that USB 2.0 or greater support, that's shown in Device Manager under USB controllers as one or more Enhanced controller or similar, and at least one Root Hub will have more than 3 USB port connections in total.

(e.g. click on Computer, select System Properties in the top bar, a Device Manager button is on the left on the resulting screen.)

If that IS correct in Device Manager, then you may need to plug the external drive into a different USB port, or use a better USB cable between the external drive and the USB port.
Also, sometimes, more likely with the USB ports built into a laptop, you must use a USB Y cable between the external drive and the computer such that you're plugging into TWO USB ports on the computer end.

Troubleshooting USB device problems including for flash drives, external drives, memory cards.
See Response 1:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...


Report •

#5
August 7, 2011 at 20:50:34
Thanks for the 2nd response :D Here's some info for the questions you asked:

1) Windows 7 was pre-installed when I bought the laptop in January 2010. I've also gone back to the individual USB Root Hub properties and found that the last 2 (of the 6 total indicated) now do show them as running in High Speed. The first 4 show only running in Full Speed.

So my next question is: How do I know which 2 of the 4 physical USB ports on my laptop (2 are on the left, 2 on the right side) are the ones that are running in the High Speed instead of the Full Speed? Best,

Kurt


Report •

#6
August 8, 2011 at 06:46:08
You cannot tell except by experimenting unless the factory can tell you or you open and trace back the wires to the numbers on the port connector on the motherboard.
See if high speed USB in set correctly in BIOS.
Manually download the motherboard drivers from the manufacturer's website for your model and operating system. If this does not help by it self then uninstall USB controller in Device Manager and restart the machine. They will be detected by Windows as new hardware and will load the newer drivers.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#7
August 8, 2011 at 08:47:30
Where it says USB 2.0 in the following, in most cases, the same applies to USB 3.0 support.
USB 3.0 controllers and devices are backward compatible with USB 1.x and USB 2.0 devices and specs. USB 2.0 controllers and devices are backward compatible with USB 1.x devices and specs.

The main chipset drivers would have been installed in the original brand name software installation, and the USB 2.0 support would have been loaded in Windows.
However, if you have re-loaded just Windows from scratch since, you must install the main chipset drivers in order for Windows to install the USB 2.0 support.

When the mboard has one or more USB 2.0 controllers, if the Windows USB 2.0 support has been installed in Windows, in Device Manager - USB controllers, the lines shown there
- are for support for both USB 1.1 (USB 1.x; USB 1.0 and USB 1.1) spec devices and USB 2.0 spec devices
- if the USB 2.0 support has been loaded, one or more USB controllers are listed as Enhanced controllers or similar - all the rest of the USB controllers listed are for USB 1.1 (USB 1.1 or USB 1.0) support
- most of the Root Hub listings are for the USB 1.x support - they usually have two USB ports per hub, but may have 1 or 3 in some cases
- one or more of the Root Hub listings are for the USB 2.0 support - they always have MORE than 3 USB ports per hub.
- the total number of USB ports for the Root Hubs for USB 1.1 (1.x) support = the total number of USB ports for the Root Hubs for USB 2.0 support - they are the same number of available USB ports, each USB port can be used to support either USB 1.x or USB 2.0 devices.

To find the total number of USB ports supported by a Root Hub, double click on a Root Hub line, click on the Power tab.
It's the total number available, or the total number still available plus the total number of any USB devices listed that are using a USB port., or if all the USB ports on the hub are being used, the total number of USB devices listed that are using a USB port.

Same number of available USB ports = the physical ports that are built into the mboard plus the number of USB port connections available by connecting wiring to (a) USB header(s) on the mboard.
E.g. a laptop or netbook often has a memory card reader that connects to one USB port connection on a header on the mboard.
A desktop computer usually has one or more USB header(s) - often the front ports lower down on the case are each connected to the pins for one USB port on a USB header. The desktop case may also have a memory card reader installed on the front of the case that connects to a connection for one USB port on a header.

The early mboards that had USB 2.0 controllers often had USB 1.1 only controllers as well - in that case certain USB ports supported only USB 1.1 or USB 1.0 devices, you would get the same message you're getting, or a similar message, if you plugged in device that informs Windows it would work better if plugged into a port that supports a faster speed, other USB ports supported both USB 1.x devices and USB 2.0 devices, you would never get the message you're getting, or similar, unless the wiring from a mboard USB header was inadequate to the port, but that was a brief situation, and newer mboards that have USB 2.0 controllers always support both USB 1.x devices and USB 2.0 devices for all USB ports.
........

If it's ONLY the external drive you get this message with when you plug it into a USB port that's built into the laptop, or if the external drive is NOT plugged into a USB port that's built into the laptop, see the last part of response 4 !
........

I don't have any computer that has a USB 3.0 controller, so, I don't know if there are listings in Device Manger - USB controllers
- for both USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 devices / support
- for separate Root Hubs for USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 support. If they are listed separatey , it's probable that the total number of USB ports for the Root Hubs for USB 1.1 (1.x) support = the total number of USB ports for the Root Hubs for USB 2.0 = the total number of USB ports for the Root Hubs for USB 3.0 support.
.....

If you're not sure if bios settings are set to enable the highest speed of all USB ports, load bios defaults in the bios Setup, Save settings - that always enables the hardware support for the highest speed of all USB ports.


Report •

#8
August 8, 2011 at 14:11:29
The card reader may slow the 2 USB ports connected to the same USB controller.

If you look at the properties listing for each port you will find which IRQ is in use for that port.


Report •

Ask Question