Solved Memtest86 somehow burnt out my psu? bear with me.

Corsair Hx series hx750 gold modular pow...
November 27, 2013 at 23:38:51
Specs: Windows 7 64, phenom ii x6
ok - I'm posting this off my phone so pardon any typos.. such as the title (bare). I know this might sound nuts, but my computer was having a lot of random issues - blue screens, graphics issues, etc. I suspected bad psu but wanted to run a memor memtest. 5 minutes into the test and my computer shuts off, smells like burning, and won't turn on anymore. " Well, seems like I was right!" And I order a corsair hx750.

everything starts up fine with the corsair and I think I'm all set when I get another bsod after two days or so. " hmm, that's kinda weird, I guess I'm having a slew of problems, maybe bad mobo." I run memtest again and go to the bathroom and go figure, my computer is turned off and once again bricked. it ain't turn on at all, smells like burning. fans won't run. sometimes it clicks and mobo lights up for a sec before failing. did I get unlucky? That's too much of a coincidence, no? what could be making my psu die during memest? i admittedly didn't test if my old psu still worked standalone .. is my psu actually alive and this was a coincidence?


specs as follows:

-amd phenom ii x6 1090
-msi 870a-g55 mobo
-gtx 470
-seagate 2tb hdd
-corsair 2 4 gb mem sticks ( forget exact specs but it's correct for the mobo)
-4 fans, 2 on sides, 1 intake in front bot, 1 outtake back top

message edited by foxfoot


See More: Memtest86 somehow burnt out my psu? bear with me.

Report •


✔ Best Answer
November 29, 2013 at 15:59:48
Update: Successfully ran the paper clip test with two fans attached. It seems as though the corsair is still good, or at least has enough juice to power fans.

Starting to think the MOBO is more and more likely to be the actual culprit. I've looked around, didn't see any glaring issues such as burnt out capacitors or loose screws, but I'll dissassemble it a little later and see if there might be something I missed.

edit: disassembled it, everything looks fine, no loose screws or likely culprits for a short circuit. tried running it without video card, without memory, etc. still nothing.

Also, I actually have a really good quality surge protector, for those who thought that might be the issue. It's a couple years old now, but it's not one of those cheap $20 ones.

message edited by foxfoot



#1
November 28, 2013 at 04:54:09
At this point, your best bet would be to pull out a voltmeter and test the new PSU. I'd suspect it was effectively DOA.

If it is bad, and your next PSU dies less than a week later, look into better surge suppression.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

#2
November 28, 2013 at 06:50:18
right. assuming it's actually dead, you think both of them dying that way was effectively a coincidence?

surge suppression? Other than a surge protector, what's that entail?


Report •

#3
November 28, 2013 at 09:36:00
The fact that two PSU's burnt might be coincidence but it certainly makes you wonder if there is something else at play - capacitor on mobo shorting or something.

I don't think memtest itself was the culprit. If it has anything to do with it then it was simply because it was giving the PSU a bit of work to do. It wouldn't wreck a good PSU.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
November 28, 2013 at 18:25:48
Right - I don't think Memtest was the problem really either. I'm just trying to figure out why a brand new PSU that's apparently of a very good make would fail in the exact same way. Whether it's' Memtest or not, when I get a new PSU, I'd rather it not fail under pressure because of something else in the computer.

Is it possibly it's ultimately my MOBO that's gone bad and it's causing problems with the PSU? Because of the holidays I haven't had the chance to test the PSU but I'm pretty confident it's fried.


Report •

#5
November 28, 2013 at 19:03:40
It is possible but unusual. A PSU has circuitry intended to minimise the likelihood of it being zapped in the event of unfavourable external conditions:
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/prin...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#6
November 28, 2013 at 19:09:12
Test the power from your outlet with a plug in tester to be sure ground, neutral, and hot lines are correct.
Using a strong light, examine the motherboard carefully for signs of problems. These can be popped, leaky, or bulging capacitors, burnt or discolored parts of the circuit board itself or components on the motherboard.
Carefully examine to make sure that all of the motherboard's stand offs and attachment screws are still firmly attached and there are no loose screws lying around inside the case or under the board.
Make sure that there are no sharp edges that might have cut through the insulation on both power supply's wires.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#7
November 29, 2013 at 04:00:29
Consider a new surge protector. That cheap $20 thing you picked up at WalMart years ago probably isn't protecting your system anymore.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

#8
November 29, 2013 at 15:59:48
✔ Best Answer
Update: Successfully ran the paper clip test with two fans attached. It seems as though the corsair is still good, or at least has enough juice to power fans.

Starting to think the MOBO is more and more likely to be the actual culprit. I've looked around, didn't see any glaring issues such as burnt out capacitors or loose screws, but I'll dissassemble it a little later and see if there might be something I missed.

edit: disassembled it, everything looks fine, no loose screws or likely culprits for a short circuit. tried running it without video card, without memory, etc. still nothing.

Also, I actually have a really good quality surge protector, for those who thought that might be the issue. It's a couple years old now, but it's not one of those cheap $20 ones.

message edited by foxfoot


Report •


Ask Question