MBs for AMD Athlon 64 3000+

Micro-star international / Ms-7260
September 12, 2010 at 08:06:17
Specs: Microsoft Windows XP Professional, 1.809 GHz / 2047 MB
Only recently have I discovered that my motherboard might be dying, and I'd like to replace it as soon as possible. Problem is, I don't know which is compatible for my AMD Athlon 64 3000+ processor. Intel and AMD MBs come to my mind, but are there anything else?

See More: MBs for AMD Athlon 64 3000+

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#1
September 12, 2010 at 08:28:29
What makes you think your board is dying? Make sure the board is the problem before you needlessly replace the wrong hardware component.

You have an AMD CPU therefore you need a board that supports AMD CPUs. Intel does NOT support AMD CPUs, AMD does NOT support Intel CPUs.

The A64 3000+ came in several different socket types, 754, 939, AM2. So the 1st thing you need to deteremine is which one you have. Then you need to decide which features (onboard video, memory type, number of memory slots, etc) you want in your motherboard & which chipset (VIA, SIS, nVidia, or AMD) you'd prefer. Then you can begin shopping for a board.

Understand that Windows will have to be reinstaled after the board swap.


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#2
September 12, 2010 at 08:28:38
disregard this, Jam nailed it first.

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#3
September 12, 2010 at 08:31:39
Wow, 9 seconds difference!

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Related Solutions

#4
September 12, 2010 at 19:28:57
@jam: I've been having computer freezes when I run memory-intensive applications. I've already ruled out the graphics card and the RAM through some tests (the graphics card still works when I used it on another computer and memtest doesn't show any errors after some runs). Recently, I tried switching out the PSU in hopes of the problem lying in an underpowered PSU, to no avail.

I'm pretty much down to my motherboard and my processor. I brought my friend along to check, and he noted some capacitors "bulging" in the mobo. I've always thought the mobo might be responsible for my problems, and that revelation just strengthened it.

Anyway, I'm using a very old AMD Athlon 64, which is a Socket AM2 processor. Thanks for the answer, though. I think I have a slightly clearer thought on what to consider.


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#5
September 12, 2010 at 19:49:54
"I'm using a very old AMD Athlon 64, which is a Socket AM2 processor"

That's not "very old". A socket 754 board is "very old".

"he noted some capacitors "bulging" in the mobo"

Did you also see these bulging caps? It was a semi-common problem many years ago when an unfinished electrolyte formula was stolen & used for the production of caps. The problem is not very common these days but I've read there are still some of these bad caps in circulation. Wikipedia has a lot of good pics:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...

CPUs generally work or they don't. The only possible problem *may* be overheating. Check your temp reading in the BIOS. RAM is another possibility. Make sure the voltage is set as per the RAM manufacturer's specs...do NOT use AUTO settings. You provided no info on either the power supply (PSU) or video card. Just because you swapped the PSU doesn't mean you got a good one. And wattage is NOT how to judge whether a PSU can handle the load or not. It must be a reputable brand name unit & the amperage specs MUST be adequate.


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#6
September 29, 2010 at 22:51:08
Video card: NVIDIA 7300GT
PSU: Cooler Master eXtreme Power Plus 550W

Sorry I can't provide clear information on this. I'm not exactly knowledgeable in troubleshooting computer problems, especially hardware.

"Make sure the voltage is set as per the RAM manufacturer's specs...do NOT use AUTO settings."

Is there a way for me to figure out how much voltage I need for my RAM? My brother bought this for me, so I'm not sure what he actually placed. I can open the case and check, but I don't know where to look.


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