LCD resolution a weird one...

Custom / CUSTOM
March 19, 2009 at 23:42:33
Specs: Windows XP, athlon fx 4400/ 2gb
I bought this cheap westinghouse lcd...it's 19inch that supposedly only does 1680x1050 natively. So I played around with the settings and got it near my old crt's resolution of 1920x1200 (old crt did 1900x1400 or something close to that). The problem is the picture ghosts horizontally not so much that it's that's noticeable but enough to bug me at times. So I bought a DVI cable thinking that would help but unfortunately it keeps me stuck at the "native" resolution of 1680x1050, and yes at that resolution all problems go away but I got used to having more "space" on my desktop. The nvidia driver I use has settings for custom resolutions you create which is how i was able to get the 1920x1200 one, but i haven't the slightest clue as to what most of those settings do.

So is there anyway to get rid of the ghosting? I don't mean like motion ghosting but a good example is the borders on a window show like three more lines next to it that are dimmer, move the window the "ghost" lines move with it.

The larger resolution only works with the analog vga cable.

Truth can become lie, but if lies become truth we're in trouble.


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#1
March 20, 2009 at 05:41:29
"So is there anyway to get rid of the ghosting?"

Yes, run at the native resolution. Anything other than that & the display will be distorted. If you're not happy with it, return/exchange the monitor. The vast majority of LCDs' are widescreen, either 16:9 or 16:10, but there are still some 4:3 LCD's available. For example, the monitor I have at work is a 20" Dell 2007FPb with a native resolution of 1600 x 1200.


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#2
March 23, 2009 at 22:40:26
I got used to the bigger resolution...yes the image quality degrades hence me trying to figure out a way to get rid of the ghosting. On another note it wont even let me scale it up in vista I don't even care about the ghosting I just want 1920x1200

Truth can become lie, but if lies become truth we're in trouble.


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