Laptop Password removal BIOS flash error

Acer Aspire 7540-1317 notebook - athlon...
August 30, 2010 at 07:31:06
Specs: Windows 7 Professional, 32-bit, Debian 5.0 Lenny 32-bit dual boot, 2.0 GHz, 3.00 GB RAM
Hello, I have an Acer Aspire 7540 notebook. I knowingly set a password on my BIOS along time ago. I noted the password down on a piece of paper somewhere in my room but I cannot find it, although I know it is in here. I know you can remove a BIOS password by flashing it, however I have been given warnings that it can destroy your computer if it goes wrong. I have no option but to flash the BIOS to remove the password if I really cannot find the written password. So I went to the website of my manufacturer, www.acer.co.uk and went to support and drivers and downloaded the BIOS update (my PC has an outdated BIOS). When I run the flash program (winflash) to flash the BIOS an error message pops up saying "Model ID check error!" and then the program terminates without help/advice. It happens every time I run it with no notification of how to solve it. Is anybody else having the same issue? It says there is a BAT file which will flash the BIOS in a pure DOS/X86_64 environment but I don't want to touch that file in case it destroys my computer. Anybody in the same boat?
Help gladly appreciated.

See More: Laptop Password removal BIOS flash error

Report •

#1
August 30, 2010 at 08:52:25
I know you can remove a BIOS password by flashing it

That's very interesting .... from your perspective. If that was true it's a shame to realize that all big name computer manufacturers are dummies after all.

i_Xp/Vista/W7User


Report •

#2
August 30, 2010 at 09:13:55
Its their software that is the problem. OK they provided me a way of flashing the BIOS but I would appreciate it if it actually worked, like on my other computer where it flashed the BIOS with no warnings, no errors, and the BIOS was upgraded perfectly. They are not dummies, they are just lazy and don't really want to make software which just does what it is meant to do without causing you trouble. So I do blame the computer manufacturers for the software issues. I have heard of many acer customers having BIOS problems so they are clearly at fault here.
And yes, it was my fault I lost the BIOS password.

Report •

#3
August 30, 2010 at 09:21:36
Call Acer and demand elevated technical support help. They know better than any of us because they closely-guard the information you need from the public.

i_Xp/Vista/W7User


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
August 30, 2010 at 09:36:06
Thanks for the suggestion. If I cannot find the BIOS password or I cannot flash the stupid thing I will do that.

Report •

#5
August 30, 2010 at 09:47:17
Modern laptops are very well protected because it's easy to steal them.

You would be much better off if you could figure out what the password you used was, if in fact that's the truth. You're supposed to use a password you can easily remember.

I / we have seen hundreds of posts where someone claims they or the former user don't / doesn't remember a system access, bios access, or hard drive password for a laptop, and in the vast majority of those cases, especially if it's a system access or hard drive password which would have to be known every time the computer was used, I / we suspect it's actually someone who knowingly or unknowing has a stolen laptop, or is trying to access someone else's laptop they shouldn't have the right to access.

The password info on modern laptops (those newer than ten years old or possibly a bit older) is NOT stored on the bios chip - it's stored on another chip that cannot have it's user data contents erased by removing the power to it.
If the password is for hard drive access, the password info is stored both on that chip that you can't erase, and on the hard drive in an area that is not accessible by using any normally available program.
Flashing the bios won't remove the password info on that chip.

If you can't boot the computer from a bootable disk in it's present passworded protected state, you can't flash the bios in any case.

If your only problem is the Boot Order or similar settings are not set right, e.g. you can't boot from a CD or DVD, on a laptop , you usually have the option of pressing a key while a certain line is displayed on the screen, that pops up a list of drives or devices you can boot from - you choose one of them, and you will be able to boot from that if it's bootable, despite the fact the Boot Order or similar settings are not set right. However, if the password you can't remember is the system access password, you probably won't be able to do that.

There are a small number number of experts that can remove passwords, but, of course, that will cost you money.

E.g.

A company in the UK that can remove hard drive passwords from certain laptop hard drives for 49 pounds, or any other laptop hard drive for 149 pounds. The drive must be shipped to them. It appears that the rate does not include shipping charges.

See Response 3
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...


Report •

#6
August 30, 2010 at 10:02:33
Flashing the BIOS will NOT remove the password. If it were that easy, everyone would do it.

Why did you setup a password in the 1st place? Is this a shared laptop & you were concerned someone else might tinker with the settings? If no one else has access, it seems stupid that you'd setup a password. You *may* be able to clear it if you crack open the case & remove the CMOS battery for a few seconds, but as Tubes pointed out, newer laptops have that info stored in a special security chip.

Your best bet would be to search for that piece of paper with the password on it, if "said paper" actually exists.


Report •

#7
August 30, 2010 at 10:16:00
"I knowingly set a password on my BIOS along time ago."
It appears that model may only be a year or so old.

"my PC has an outdated BIOS"
I can't think of any reason you would need to flash the BIOS on a laptop.


Report •

#8
August 30, 2010 at 14:43:50
Thanks for the replies all. Fortunately I have now found the darn BIOS password paper and I have deleted the stupid thing. It was a boot order problem. I wanted to be able to boot from a USB flash drive to complete my triple boot, thanks for the replies.
Problem is now gone. Better remind myself to keep laptop safe or with me at all times and not do that again.

Cheers all


Report •

#9
August 30, 2010 at 14:58:05
As I said in response # 5:

"If your only problem is the Boot Order or similar settings are not set right, e.g. you can't boot from a CD or DVD, on a laptop , you usually have the option of pressing a key while a certain line is displayed on the screen,"...while booting... " that pops up a list of drives or devices you can boot from - you choose one of them, and you will be able to boot from that if it's bootable, despite the fact the Boot Order or similar settings are not set right."


Report •

#10
September 1, 2010 at 08:14:03
That is interesting, as I thought that the only way to be able to change those kind of settings would be having access to the BIOS. Thanks for the response.

Report •

Ask Question