Is it worth trying to fix my 2-yr. old failed desktop?

Emachines T5088 desktop
October 18, 2012 at 10:31:44
Specs: Windows 7 Home Premium, Athlon II X2 4GB DDR3
I have a pretty nice 2-year old desktop system that recently failed, so I picked up a new one. At the time I bought it, it was a nice computer and ran great up to the day it stopped working. I would love to get it running again for other uses, but not sure if it is worth it or how difficult it would be. I bought it on Newegg and it shows up as discontinued now. It still powers up and the indicator lights come on, but nothing shows up on the screen. I am fairly certain it is either the motherboard or processor b/c I tested the video card, power supply, RAM, HD, & secured all the connections, but still the same result. I have enough computer knowledge to be dangerous (can change out components & install OS), but I am definitely not an expert.

So I guess my question is: Assuming it is the motherboard or processor, do you think it is worth replacing (money & time investment) to get this thing running again considering that I could probably get a comp. machine for a few hundred bucks? I've never replaced a motherboard or processor before, so I'm not sure how big of a deal it is. Will it take many hours doing it for the 1st time? Will it be more investment than it is worth?

Here is more info about the computer:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

AMD Athlon II X2 250(3.0GHz)
64 bit Dual Core Processor
2 x 1MB L2 Cache
Memory
4GB DDR3 1333
Hard Drive
500GB SATA II
Optical Drive 1
24X DL DVD+/-RW Drive
Graphics
ATI Radeon HD 5450 1GB
Motherboard Chipset
AMD 770

Thanks!


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#1
October 18, 2012 at 10:57:02
Could also be corrupt RAM.

Anyway.

If you can't say for sure, what component is corrupt, it makes no sense to buy things like motherboard, RAM or Processor.

Further, if you've never change a mainboard, I suggest, don't try.

I would suggest to bring it to a repair shop, to get an estimate of cost.


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#2
October 18, 2012 at 10:59:26
"do you think it is worth replacing (money & time investment) to get this thing running again"

If you think you can get it going for less than about $50 (roughly what it'd be worth) or learn something significant in the process, I'd say go for it...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#3
October 18, 2012 at 10:59:28
Don't begin by assuming you have a motherboard or processor problem. Can we assume you tested the video card and hdd in another machine?

If the power supply boots another machine, do not assume it is good. Try a different psu or two and see if anything changes.

Any odd stuff happen before this rig failed to boot?

Skip
Audares Juvo


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Related Solutions

#4
October 18, 2012 at 11:01:17
I am fairly certain it is either the motherboard or processor b/c I tested the video card, power supply, RAM, HD, & secured all the connections, but still the same result.
U forgot to swap the PSU. If failed to start swap the video card.

Edit:
U guys are fast.

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.


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#5
October 18, 2012 at 15:11:27
"Any odd stuff happen before this rig failed to boot?"

Good point - I meant to also mention this - I live in San Francisco where nobody has air conditioning b/c you don't need it - around the time it failed we had a heat wave where it got very hot inside my house and I could hear the fan working harder than usual - so it very well may have overheated something.

Regarding the other suggestions, I did test w/ 1 other PSU & another video card w/ no success & also tested w/ different RAM.

Thanks for the replies!


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#6
October 18, 2012 at 15:40:09
Don't think your "heatwave" is the problem. I live about 150 miles SE of you and it's 90° here today.

If heat was the problem, it's likely the machine would try to boot then shut down later on. Immediate shutdown would probably mean the machine has taken a hard enough knock to dislodge the heatsink.

A visual inspection and quick wiggle of the heatsink/fan should confirm if it's loose or not.

Skip
Audares Juvo


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#7
October 18, 2012 at 19:57:22
In addition to all of the above, take a strong light and examine carefully all components and all parts of the motherboard. Look for loose connections, loose components, burnt/brown/bulging components on your motherboard, or even a screw or other part floating around in the computer's case.
Post results.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.
---- Save Big Bird -----


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#8
October 18, 2012 at 21:45:30
I did a thorough inspection of all the components & parts - did not find any loose connections or anything out of the ordinary. I will try another PSU, but it is sounding like it may not be worth trying to troubleshoot this further. My concern about taking it in to a repair place is that it may end up costing almost as much as getting a new rig. Nothing in San Francisco is cheap!

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#9
October 18, 2012 at 22:21:54
but it is sounding like it may not be worth trying to troubleshoot this further.
If u gonna let a good system collecting dust better ship the entire system to me, i will be grateful.

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.


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