Is IDE HDD compatible for Win7 X64 install?

Microsoft Windows 7 ultimate 64-bit
January 31, 2010 at 07:37:40
Specs: Windows 7 Ult
Being an experienced PC builder and repairer I'm stumped with the following, hopeing you can help me. I started installing Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit onto a IDE HDD, but when the PC restarted as part of the installation it refused to boot past the page that states what drives are fitted with the Smart ok, etc. I've tried to enter the SETUP and BOOT FROM mode and although the selections show as being choseen nothing happens. I have tried the HDD as a Master and also a Slave to seperate working Masters (XP & 7), but the PC will not go past the aforementioned page. It seems my PC is only for 32 Bit programs so I suspect my 64 Bit installation has caused the trouble I'm experiencing. How can I get my PC to accept the IDE HDD with the first stage of Windows 7 Ult 64 Bit?
I'm running with a Pentium 4 CPU & 2Gb RAM.

See More: Is IDE HDD compatible for Win7 X64 install?

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#1
January 31, 2010 at 07:52:12
An experienced builder would know you can't run a 64-bit OS with a 32-bit CPU.

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#2
January 31, 2010 at 07:59:59
I didn't know it was a 32 bit CPU. And your answer doesn't help. I also should have added my PC still works as normal with other HDD's. It's just this one HDD that will not allow the PC to fully boot.

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#3
January 31, 2010 at 08:12:55
the regular old 478 P4? If so thats why, you can't run 64 bit OS's
on a 32 bit chip. thats why your drive isn't booting, can't run 64
bit code through a 32 bit only chip.

Format the drive and install a 32 bit version of windows.


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Related Solutions

#4
January 31, 2010 at 08:21:36
I wish I could, but the HDD stops the PC booting beyond the status page, both as a Master and as a Slave. I cannot do anything to format or whatever. I'm wondering if I maybe tried fitting it into a PC that would work with a 64 bit OS, that I might be able to get the thing formatted. What do you think?

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#5
January 31, 2010 at 10:34:07
I thought you were experienced? You don't have to boot to the HDD to format it. You need to boot off a disc (XP CD, HDD manufacturer's CD, Ultimate Boot CD, Hiren's Boot CD, etc) to wipe out all partitioning, then repartition & reformat. You could even run FDISK from a WinME boot floppy to wipe out the partitioning.

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#6
February 1, 2010 at 04:01:01
I think you've missed the point I have been making, and that is... the PC will do absolutely nothing, zilch, bugg*r-all, zero, with this HDD connected as a slave or master. When it is connected the PC will not read disks, it will not boot up beyond the status page, it will not do anything at all. I cannot get a disk or anything else to work because the PC freezes solid. I thought that was made clear. I am experienced, although since moving to Morocco, a 3rd world country that I would say is approx 50 years behind, I guess my experience is probably a bit lacking to the more modern hardware that's now available. I hope my problem is a bit clearer. Thanks for your reply but it hasn't helped much.

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#7
February 1, 2010 at 04:19:23
If you can't get the PC to POST and it did POST before then my guess would be the jumpers on the IDE drives are not set correctly.

The content on the hard drive doesn't matter until you get to the boot stage. Sounds like you may not be getting that far.

When using TWO drives on one cable you must have one set as Master and one set as Slave. Or you could set both to CS (cable select). When using Master/slave settings either drive can be connected to either connector. When using CS the drive on the end of the cable will be the Master.

You don't appear to be very experienced with computer hardware. These rules have been in effect for some time now.

Set the jumpers correctly then boot to a 32 bit Windows disk and install.


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#8
February 1, 2010 at 06:36:10
Once again, that answer has already been tried. And you incorrectly assume I do not know anything about jumpers. The only thing I didn't know was the P4 CPU was a 32 bit unit. I have tried absolutely everything that can be tried and I was hoping there might be an answer to why a HDD that has been partially loaded with an 64 bit OS that doesn't match the PC's system could be made to work or at least formatted when the boot-stage cannot be reached by any means. All the answers I have received have been previously tried and I thought I had made that perfectly clear. However, I am only too aware that many tend to read what they expect to see and can miss out on all the valid and present information. It's a human flaw. I do wish I hadn't studied psychology, it can be trying. Anyway, I've given up asking as I now believe my previous idea is all that will work and no one has experienced this sort of situation before. In addition to this, I suppose I was relying on Windows 7 to carry out a pre-loading/installation test as part of the installation, informing me if my PC was or wasn't compatable. I reckon that would be a handy addition for any new software; please take note, Microsoft.
I would like to thank everyone who answered, spending their valuable time to help me. Now I'll try and find someone nearby in Morocco, where I live, someone who may have a 64 bit PC, but I have my doubts if such a thing has arrived here. We've only just reached the SATA stage, would you believe.
:-) Sigh.

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#9
February 1, 2010 at 06:48:47
I will state once more. The data on a hard drive has absolutely NO bearing on weather of not the hard drive will be identified in the BIOS. You obviously have something set wrong.

Are you trying to boot to the Windows disk? If so, do you have the boot order set for the CD/DVD drive before the hard drive?

Watch for a message to hit any key to boot from the CD drive. If you don't get that message then you either have the boot order wrong, the drives configured wrong, or have a bad disk.

Watch the post screens at start up. If all your drives are not identified there then you either have defective drives, or more likely they are not properly configured.

Trying to insult our intelligence gets you no where. You may be the one that doesn't understand.


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#10
February 6, 2010 at 07:00:57
OK, guys'n gals. This is how I finally managed to repair the HDD. To begin with, if all that I have written was understood everyone should have been aware that my computer would only Boot so far before freezing, which meant I COULDN'T USE ANY KIND OF DISK TO FORMAT, Etc, MY FAULTY HDD. And even though I was inundated with the same info, more or less, there was nothing that could be done. However, my theory of the HDD with a partial 64 bit Windows 7 Ultimate being installed on the HDD meant it was looking for a 64 bit computer. I guess this has never happened before because no-one seemed to understand what the problem was, even though I went to great lengths to inform them. Anyway, I found someone with a 64 bit PC & OS, a computer that was accepted by the HDD. It formatted easily and is now refitted into my 32 bit PC with a 32 bit Windows 7 Ult installed. I'm actually using the new system to write this. So, everyone, like sitting an exam, you should always read the question/info at least twice before writing an answer that might be completely bollocks. 'Nough said, except thanks to all for trying to help me. :-)

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#11
February 6, 2010 at 08:24:42
You are clueless scotty.

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