identify mobo

Ms-6777 / MSI
February 6, 2009 at 11:00:52
Specs: Windows XP, 1.9ghz/512 sdram
hello everyone,

I have another socket A mobo i can't really get around to identify. From what I've been able to gather so far, it's a Jetway. the inscription by the agp slot says 3902a568 and there's a paper sticker by the 2 ram slots that reads 830CH. it has onboard audio. the bios chip is a winbond, and has an orange see-thru stamp on it that reads '60' or '09' depending on how it's viewed :) there's also a phoenixbios sticker on the cnr slot, it reads d686 bios 093143402

i'm hoping the info i provided is enough. i need this baby's manual and drivers, as well as a bios update+utility if possible. your help is as always appreciated

rob

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#1
February 6, 2009 at 11:54:09

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#2
February 6, 2009 at 12:21:54
830CH

Manual
http://www.fatblokeracing.org/pdfs/...
Picture, description
http://computing.kelkoo.co.uk/ps_39...

Several versions 830CNR (very similar) here:
http://www.elhvb.com/mobokive/Archi...
You may need to look at one that is the same version or revision, if the above manual is not the version or revision you have.

bios update files 830CH here:
http://www.elhvb.com/mobokive/Archi...

DO NOT update your bios unless you MUST.

There is probably NO bios update that will enable the bios to recognize a hard drive larger than 128GB (137GB manufacturer's size), because the main chipset is probably not capable of that.
If you want to use a hard drive larger than that, or if whatever bios version the mboard has, has bugs and won't recognize the size of drive you want to use, or up to 128GB drives (it might have a >32gb bug or a >64gb bug), get yourself a PCI drive controller card and connect the drive to that - you must be able to select SCSI in the boot order in your bios Setup and use that as well in order to be able to boot from a drive connected to the card.
If you want to connect optical drives to the card, the card's chipset must support ATAPI, and/or the description must say it supports optical drives (e.g. Silicom Image ones do [SIxxxxx] ; Promise ones usually do not).

I have found that the drive controller board often runs drives no faster than the main chipset will let it on many older mboards. E.g. for an IDE card, if the mboard main chipset is limited to UDMA66, so is the controller card, though the card itself is usually capable of UDMA133


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#3
February 6, 2009 at 12:31:05
1stepbeyond, YES that is it man. :)

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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Related Solutions

#4
February 6, 2009 at 12:37:47
tubesandwires, thank you so much you're a lifesaver:) that's the right manual, i'm so glad to finally have it. maybe you guys can teach this old dog new tricks :) how did you find it?

i intend to use a duron 1200 and a 80gb hd on there, so it looks like a bios update isn't even needed. did you look at the manual though? jetway had liveupdate bios back then, it's a surprise to me. there's still plenty of mobos out there today that don't, and floppies are used :)

i just finished changing 12 capacitors on it, they were swollen and leaking, those old GSC bad caps :) I threw some Fujicom caps on it and it's up and running. (it ran before too but i couldn't leave those caps on there)

again, thank you guys so much.

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#5
February 6, 2009 at 12:44:06
Crappy chipset = crappy board.

I'm curious, what did it cost you to have the caps replaced?


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#6
February 6, 2009 at 14:09:57
":) how did you find it? "

I use Yahoo rather than Google. It's optimized differently - it's better for looking for mboard info, and most other computer related info. The first manual was at or near the top of the list on the first page when I searched for 830CH.

The other site is one that has info about mboards that are mostly older than 2001 or so - mboards of that age or older do not have bioses or chipsets that support recognizing drives larger than 128/137gb. The guy (Nick or Nic) who originally made the mobokive site could no longer pay for the site or had the time to take care of it, so the elhvb guy rescued it from oblivion by making a mirror of it on his own site.

99% of the time, anything you find on the bios chip is useless - at best it has the original specific bios version code, which almost always doesn't help regarding finding which model of mboard it is.


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#7
February 6, 2009 at 14:31:49
"..intend to use a duron 1200 and a 80gb hd"

The bios version MAY have the >64gb bug - if it does, the bios subtracts 64gb from the size of the drive if it's larger than 64gb.

Keep in mind the manufacturer's decimal size is always larger than the binary size the bios and Windows uses, so the bios will see about 74gb rather than 80. Same number of bytes - just a different way of specifying.

"Crappy chipset = crappy board"

SiS chipsets are the bottom of the pile.
Some of their older chipsets could not reach 100mhz - they could only get to about 90mhz - yet they were marketed as being able to do that.


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#8
February 6, 2009 at 16:58:48
jam jam :) stop knockin SiS man I got it free and took the caps from an Epox mobo I have laying around (the one with the nforce2 chipset, remember?) broken.

this board actually has a 133 fsb jumper, but as I don't have any cpu's that run at 266/133, i'll settle.

best regards

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#9
February 7, 2009 at 08:00:58
hi
robpetrache caps galore
jam avert your eyes now, (for precaution im wearing a welders mask)

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/4-Jetway-V2DP...

fill your boots ;)

hehe


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#10
February 7, 2009 at 08:04:19
mine does post though :)

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#11
February 7, 2009 at 08:26:21

mine did,, once!, and only once about, 2 mins after buying it, a Jetway 866AS Ultra
i remember the box had a spaceship on the front, it went faster when i drop kicked it

Nasa are still tracking it

gl & hf


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#12
February 7, 2009 at 08:38:35
:))))))))))

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#13
February 7, 2009 at 11:25:32
I did some research into this subject when one of my mboards developed leaking caps (Gigabyte 7ZMMH, also a socket A).

- You should at least replace all the caps that are the same brand as any that have failed, not just the ones that have already failed.

These two things put me off even attempting replacing the capacitors:

- If you manage to replace the caps before their failing has damaged something else, that works fine, but if there is other damage, replacing them will be a wasted effort.
If the mboard no longer boots, which was my case, there might be other damage.
- I read that some cap leads go through a tube and you have to very careful as to keeping that in place while unsoldering and soldering, and not get solder near or on the tube in the wrong place, otherwise you will still have a dead mboard when you have finished installing the caps.

Buying all the caps I needed locally would have been way too expensive, even from an electronics parts specialist - this was/is a much more suitable solution:

Links on left to economical available premade or custom capacitor kits, and/or you can ship the mboard to him and he will replace the capacitors for a flat fee (including the capacitors) plus shipping (North America only).
http://www.badcaps.net/


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#14
February 7, 2009 at 12:16:27
well, in order not to affect the caps` inner tubes, the main requirement is a hi-performance iron for one thing. what i mean is, high wattage without a lot of heat dissipation. when you touch the soldering tip to the solder on the board, it should not take more than 2 seconds for it to melt thus being able to remove the cap. also, if handy, it's better to have a wider soldering tip, so you can melt both solder points simultaneously. it takes me 3 seconds overall to take a cap off the mobo. hence not enough time for heat to travel thru integrated circuits, or when soldering back the new cap, to reach its insides and damage something. i've been taught by someone who fixes mobos for a living, a true pro. i've watched this guy hotblow off a gigabit marvell chip, and hotblow ON a new one, all in under a minute i'm not joking. so i'm assuming any advice coming from him is to be taken positively.

i'll mention that he's also taught me to fix psu's that are faulty or ones that are NOT faulty (preventively), in the way of capacitor checking and replacement. i've had working psu's that were installed on good systems, that when i opened up i found 2-3-4 swollen/leaked caps, and replaced them. think of the damage they could do if it came to it that those caps became fully unfunctional. a capacitor cuts off the peaks of current sinewaves, and when a capacitor in the psu stops doing that, then the mobos caps take the extra peak load, and when they fail.. guess what, one of those current peaks will do the right job and burn out a southbridge or whatnot. off-topic but i felt i should talk about it :) so thanks for letting me share

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#15
February 7, 2009 at 12:35:07
robpetrache

What in the world are you doing with all these systems you seem to be assembling.

When this thread was fresh I started to post a negative comment about the Jetway board, which in itself is bad enough, but also has a SIS chip set but decided that wouldn't deter you from messing with it. Hope these systems are finding good deserving homes.


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#16
February 7, 2009 at 12:42:18
well man, yes, indeed there are people who will be glad to have this running in their homes for free, believe me. i'm not trying to be transcendent or anything but, as long as i keep my lil hobby satisfied and end up getting some people to enjoy having a pc of any kind, i fell i'm doing the right thing. peace

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#17
February 7, 2009 at 12:49:55
"i've been taught by someone who fixes mobos for a living, a true pro."

That makes a lot of difference - if I knew someone like that I'd like to take a look at how he does things too.
I took an electronics course over 3 years in high school, so I have soldering experience, but that was back when integrated circuits of any sort were a very new thing, and if you chose to be an electronics technician you were mostly fixing things with relatively large discrete components and that had vaccuum tubes in them.

"i've had working psu's that were installed on good systems, that when i opened up i found 2-3-4 swollen/leaked caps, and replaced them.'

Those are easier to fix, if you catch them soon enough.
A friend had one that had one cap that expoded in his PS and I happened to be there to hear that when it did - it was like hearing a 22 rifle go off in the next room - the PS never worked again. It was one that used to be mine. It was included in a generic case, and was about 4 years old. It turned out it was a PINE (embossed into the metal) with another vendor's label slapped on it - and they have a reputation for failing more often than average.
Previous to that, the same friend asked me to set up an AT system he had that he hadn't used in a while (he was disabled - muscular dystrophy - he has died since - he was a year older than me). It turned out the PS in it's fan had seized (two sleeve bearings), had cooked itself since, previous to me fiddling with the system, and it was no longer producing any 5v. It still booted fine, and the hard drives worked fine, but after I replaced the PS, I found the floppy drive and cd drive were fried, and the video card and the dial-up modem card were damaged too and no longer worked properly. The mboard, a Gigabyte model, the SIMM ram, the keyboard, and the serial mouse were not damaged, and the system still works (he gave it to me). I concluded the 5v must have gone too high at some point while the original PS was failing.
More recently, I was working on someone elses's computer and I could hear a faint soundwhen thecomputer was not running, like the sound a kettle with deposits in it sometimes makes as the water in it warms up, or water running in a metal pipe in the distance.
It is a 300 watt Sparkle, maybe 5 years old. I opened it up - at least three caps are leaking, and one is producing the sound. That one I caught in time.

When I buy a PS locally, I usually get an Enermax, which are cheaper than Antec where I am, and they have been flawless. I have noted AOpen and Startech PSs last along time too.


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#18
February 7, 2009 at 13:49:06
Sometimes I (and you, apparently) do things not because it's actually worth spending the time and effort, but because I CAN do it and it's a bit of challenge to do it; another problem to solve.

Most of my computer experience has been solving problems.

I have been able to fix nearly all of my own problems that I've tackled - computers, cars, plumbing, electrical, whatever.


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#19
February 7, 2009 at 16:08:12
well then, taking this to a whole 'nother level' first off sorry about losing a friend that's got to be humbling and painful. as far as what I (and you too) are doing.. it's like this for me: I'm a njit graduate, was living in ny and doing a daily drive to the njit campus for most of my college careeer. only during the first year i actually lived on campus. on our first day of college we all were given pc's being that we were gonna become comp. engineers. so i got my Hyundai 386sx33, fiddled with doss hell for a bit, then during sophomore year i bought my first pc, it was a 486dx266 i believe. that was back in 94 if i recall correctly. anyway so to make this short, i graduated as a comp engineer though i can't honestly say i learned anything besides lots of pascal and fortran, and some calculus. i quickly put that degree into some far away drawer, went and got an associate's degree in business management at LIU in ny, made a ton of money between 1998-2001 by selling real estate in queens, ny, closed up the real estate agency, and moved to romania, the place where i was born and lived in until the age of 14. i had left here with my parents after the revolution. . so as i was saying, came back here in 2001, took my ton of money and invested it in real estate, and bought my wife a toy store because she wanted to have an occupation. and me.. i just linger:). lingering isn't too cool for a dude used to doing something all the time, so i got into real estate transactions again, since it was my skill. then, come 2008, financial crisis became inevitable, and real estate transactions stopped dead. so now, wt_f was I to do :) and i figured why not star tmessing with pc's, since it had been a long forgotten vocation for me. luckily, upon beginning, i stumbled over people like jam, skip, othehill, which i am NOT sure to this day, either work 'here' or are somehow hired by these forums holders, or are just goodwilled people who have the knowledge and are willing to share it. nevertheless, i've been doing this since november, and by now, 3+ months later, i've fixed, built, rebuilt, flashed bioses, fixed stuff as dumb as old keyboards and mice, pc speakers, etc. at one point, i was actually seeing myself spending some family money on this hobby, so i decided that the best systems i build for free will be sold, and the money used to buy other (likely weaker) systems, which I will keep giving away for free.

Don't picture me walking around Bucharest with pc's in my arms handing them out, it's more like knowing neighbors, friends, relatives, kids of friends, kids of realtives, etc, that would like a pc. and i go and hook them up.

what else am I gonna do man? i have two daughters i do spend time with, but there still remains a ton of time to be used up. so i build pc's. now the funny thing is, some of my closer, better-off financially friends, have noticed what i'm doing. and then they just began bringing me all types of hardware components and leaving them here for me to use. so i'm just going along with it. it's fun, productive, meaningful, and an occupation. cheers

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#20
February 7, 2009 at 16:11:11
Good for you. Seems to be a noble avocation.

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#21
February 7, 2009 at 16:14:47
i'm 34 yrs old man, people in romania don't play basketball, nor pool, and it's like the best thing i found for me to do. feels good as hell too. you still haven't cleared me.. do any of you dudes work for computing.net ? or like have ranks/status ?

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#22
February 7, 2009 at 17:11:04
We are all just volunteers here. We like to help folks too. As far as rank goes I can lay claim to be one of the oldest regulars here at just under 65. That is why I am OtheHill.

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#23
February 7, 2009 at 17:13:39
way to go then, man. more power to you.

I always say it's best to doublecheck.


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#24
February 7, 2009 at 21:33:12
I've been fiddling with computers since 88 or 89, starting out occaisionally, now that and answering questions can take up much of my time, nearly every day. My Dad got a Sanyo 286 12mhz then and the first time he had a major problem he took it to where he bought it and they charged him what he thought was too much to fix it. The next time something went wrong, since he prefers to not spend money when he can, he asked me if I could figure it out, and that was my start with computers. Dos 3.2, 1mb of ram, 5 1/4" floppy drive, 32 mb MFM hard drive. We had to pay extra to get a 1.44mb floppy drive installed (over $100 for that), which was a fairly new thing. Roland Raven 24 pin dot matrix printer (like a Panasonic but with different programming; over $200 for that; I still have it). It was maybe a year before we got our first sound card - Soundblaster 2.0, the second generation of SB cards. We upgraded to Dos 3.3 shortly after we got it, then later on 5, then 6, then Win 3.1, then 6.2. I have 6.22 and Win 3.11 (Windows for Workgroups) too but haven't tried them.

Dad wanted to write a novel, so he bought a computer so he could use word processing software - those typewriters/word processors were not on the market at that time yet. He bought Q&A Write, rather than Word or WordPerfect, which were much more expensive. Q&A Write was a pretty good simpler to use word proceesing program and data base, made by a little company called Symantec. It was good enough that some up to mid sized corporations used it (e.g. Continental Can in the US). It had unique "intelligent assistant" (or similar) features no other program had at the time. Peter Norton was so impressed with that "intelligent assistant" software, he bought the Symantec company in order to get the rights for the software, and shortly after that he changed his own company name to Symantec. Peter's Symantec supported Q&A Write for a few more years, but by 2001 or so it was gone. It was a Dos program, but it worked well with Win 3.1 too.

We didn't get on the web until about 97 - internal Motorola 28.8K dial-up; later on in 99? a Zoom 56K dual mode external modem. High speed ADSL (1500kbps) since early 2000. Went from MsDos 6.2 and Win 3.1 to Win 98SE at the beggining of 2000 - I'm still using it. Didn't have XP (Home) until about 2006.
We had a couple hand-me-down computers after the Sanyo - a generic 386DX-33 (never did find out who made the mboard; Chips and Technology chips; a garage sale buy), P-Bell 486SX-33, formerly my brother's - upgraded it later to DX2-66, 4mb of ram. Built my first computer from all new pieces Dec. 1999 - I did a lot of research before I bought anything - Epox MVP3-G5 SS7, K6-III 450, 64mb of PC125 SDram (not a typo - PC125 was briefly a standard), UDMA66 (many mboards were UDMA33 at the time), 2mb L2 cache (many mboards had less at the time - caches up to 512mb of ram), 5 PCI, 2 IDE, one PCI/ISA shared (I've never had 6 slots occupied - not enough IRQs, in Win 98SE anyway), ISA SB16 PNP soundcard (has a configurable IDE port IRQ - I can install 5 IDE drives, 4 on the mboard plus that), ATI Rage Fury video (the best of the original 128 bit cards; made in Canada; the first video chipset line to have hardware DVD playback acceleration support) 32mb AGP 2X; Canon BJC-4400 printer, IS22 scanner cartridge for it. I'm still using the computer, printer, and it's scanner cartridge, except now it has Sapphire Radeon 7000 64mb video (running at 2X) and either 128mb or 256mb of PC133 SDram, and I only use black ink for the printer (I have refilled the cartridges many times).
I have one newer computer (since the 7ZMMH died), which I use often and has XP Home on it (Asus A7V600, 2.x ghz), one about the same age, and several other older ones.
I have fixed up and given away several others or their mboards, all newer than the Epox system (and Canon BJ-xxx and BJC-xxxx printers). Three of those, and a newer empty case, I retrieved from an apartment garbage bin. I occaisionally assemble new systems for others for little or no labour cost for those who have little money and need a hand, including a few disabled people I first met when I visited my friend, who can't do that themselves. I occaisionally re-load computers for a resident's computer room 5 computer network and take care of other computer related problems as they occur at a local extended care center, where my friend once lived, and take care of other computer problems residents have as they occur there and at another one where some of the residents (the ones who require a ventilator machine to breathe at night or all the time) have moved to since.

I have 13 years of school - the last year 1/2 days - (Electronics and more than enough to qualify for taking Science at a university). Two years of university, but was taking pre-med and wasn't doing well enough (marks had to be really high to get into Medicine - mine were not)- never went back. Eventually I became a Journeyman Carpenter, and a jack of some other trades (residential plumbing, electrical, asphalt shingling). My back can't take it anymore and I've kind of retired from doing that, the last few years, but I do odd jobs of all sorts on request (ONLY). I'm poor as a church mouse, but I make do.

I've been answering questions and digging up info on the web since about Oct of 2004?, first at a site called Constructor's Corner that was attached to site for a little computer shop in SE Australia, Lanyon Computers, then later here, since about 2007?.

I started doing that when I had been searching for info about an old mboard and found there was too many places on the web where answers were incorrect or where they did not go into enough detail, especially if one didn't know enough background info about computers - Constructor's Corner was the first place I found that had people who answered my questions about that mboard in detail, and the first place that pointed me to where I could find something similar to the manual (the original Total Hardware 99 site, which was still up at that time). Gigabyte did not have the manual anymore - they had only a bios update for it. I decided to post all the other info I had dug up about that mboard there, and about my experience replacing the RTC module on it, and I started helping out answering questions and digging up info for others. Unlike Computing.net, Constructor's Corner specialized in answering questions about older mboards, and would respond to any question about any post already on the site no matter how old it was. Eventually those who answered dwindled down to myself (I was Mike there), a guy Alan (Greaves) who lives near Lanyon Computers in Australia, and somtimes Mal, the the guy who took care of Lanyon's server. Then the two or three guys who ran Lanyon Computers decided to close their shop and move on to something else, and their Lanyon Computers web site and attached Constructor's Corner ceased to exist not long after that when the lease for the web site expired. They saved the database, but I don't know if anyone has since bothered to make a mirror of it. Alan now helps out on another web site - he's about 5 years older than myself - he was an early computer support person, and at one time worked for Compaq in Australia, but retired early for health reasons.

Some days I spend way too much time on the computer answering questions, etc., especially in the winter, but I enjoy it when I get positive results.
I'll be 58 in August.


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