Solved I was never born

November 18, 2016 at 14:00:43
Specs: several
When I started up a brand-new HP notebook computer for the
first time, I hit the escape key to enter the UEFI / BIOS thingy.
The System Information screen there says:

Born On Date : 00/00/0000

Apparently the computer, or the BIOS, or something, ... was
never born. Does this date get filled in later? Will it stay all
zeros forever?

Also, I notice that the font on this screen doesn't distinguish
between the capital letter 'O' and the numeral '0'.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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✔ Best Answer
November 26, 2016 at 11:05:40
Probably to accurately determine actual warranty period down to the 1/100th of a second.

"sorry but you are out of warranty by 2.83 seconds" ;)



#1
November 18, 2016 at 14:28:49
When I continue on into the BIOS setup program, the
"Born On Date" is all zeros, there, too.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#2
November 18, 2016 at 16:07:42
Is there an actual problem or are you just concerned about the date?

http://h30434.www3.hp.com/t5/Window...


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#3
November 18, 2016 at 21:08:35
Just postulating here but it is possible that the Born On Date is the first day it is fully used, when the date is first set either in BIOS but more likely when it is set during the Windows Set Up. Since you entered the BIOS set up directly, it may be set later after you boot through the Windows new machine welcome screen.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#4
November 19, 2016 at 02:34:16
I was speculating that it would be something along those
lines, but it doesn't quite make sense to me. Why would a
date in the BIOS depend on when the operating system first
runs? So far I've booted it exactly once, and spent I dunno
how many hours poking around in various settings. I did
change the time by about 2 minutes in BIOS, assuming the
hour was correct UTC (it looked about right), but when I got
into Windows and changed the time zone from Pacific to
Central (two hours), I found that the time was hours off.
So I changed the time there, too. Next time I start it the
first thing I'm gonna do is see what the time is in the BIOS,
and find out if the thing has been born yet.

I would have expected a birthdate for the BIOS itself. None.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#5
November 19, 2016 at 07:21:18
Because the BIOS is now closely tied to the OS. Before, the BIOS was totally independent.

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#6
November 19, 2016 at 16:42:55
The birthdate DID get set! It is today's date rather than
yesterday's, so I can't tell whether it was set by Windows
or by the BIOS / UEFI. It might have been today CST or
just today UTC.

-- Jeff, Root


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#7
November 19, 2016 at 20:34:27
I guess we all learned something (though most of us would not have noticed it before). Apparently the machine is able to be stored unused in a store or warehouse and becomes born when it is really booted for the first time so the customer feels they are getting a new machine. It is most likely that the Windows Welcome/set up process is what sets this date in the BIOS.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
November 26, 2016 at 11:05:40
✔ Best Answer
Probably to accurately determine actual warranty period down to the 1/100th of a second.

"sorry but you are out of warranty by 2.83 seconds" ;)


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