I just installed my new graphics card, now my pc keeps freez

August 20, 2013 at 02:12:25
Specs: Windows 8 64bit, i7 3770 16GB
I just installed my new graphics card,GeForece 650 ti BOOST 2GB and a new power supply to go with the more power needed, Corsair HX750. How when i start to play a game my pc freezes. Please Help

See More: I just installed my new graphics card, now my pc keeps freez

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#1
August 20, 2013 at 02:16:01
Hi Boneyear1,

Did you install latest driver from Manufacturers website?
Did you update the BIOS of the system board before installing the new video card?
Is it happening with a particular game or all the games?

Thanks & Regards
Manshu S
#iworkfordell


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#2
August 20, 2013 at 09:55:37
Post your computer hardware specs. Particularly the motherboard and RAM.

What graphics were you previously using?


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#3
August 20, 2013 at 12:13:48
Manufacturer: ZT Systems
Processor: Intel Core i7-3770 CPU @ 3.40GHz 3.90GHz
This is my mother board: GIGABYTE GA-B75M-D3H
16GB Ram
1 SSD
2tb Hard Drive

Yes, i installed the latest drivers
I did not update any BIOS before installing my GPU
It crashes with all games
i was preveously using a GeForce 630

message edited by Boneyear1


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Related Solutions

#4
August 20, 2013 at 12:34:05
Your motherboard link is broken. Post the model or a good link.

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#5
August 20, 2013 at 12:57:14
I have replaced it

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#6
August 20, 2013 at 15:08:28
Page 8 of your motherboard user manual explains which PCI graphics slot to use when installing only 1 card. See the link if you do NOT have this manual.

http://download.gigabyte.us/FileLis...


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#7
August 20, 2013 at 16:17:58
Did you connect the 6Pin PCIe connector to the card? I know that this might be obvious (I do not mean to insult), but your old graphics card did not require this connector so I just wanted to cover all possibilities.

Note (unrelated): Unless you plan on possibly running a pair of these cards in the future, the Corsair 600W version of your power supply would have been plenty. Just a friendly note.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
August 21, 2013 at 20:58:42
Yes,i plugged in the pin connector

I have narrowed down my problem to my PSU overheating.

My computer runs around 55-60 degrees Celcuis, is this to hot?
What temp should i be aiming for?


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#9
August 22, 2013 at 05:00:43
Which temperature are you quoting and how are you measuring it (BIOS, program, what program)?

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#10
August 22, 2013 at 14:03:46
i am quoting my CPU Tempreture i got the measurment using my motherboards BIOS

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#11
August 22, 2013 at 15:39:52
What makes you think the Power Supply Unit is overheating?

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#12
August 22, 2013 at 15:58:02
Because my power supply is only rated to 50 celcuis, and my computer runs around 55-60 celcius

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#13
August 22, 2013 at 19:57:30
Your BIOS shows multiple temps, which one(s) are you referring to?
Install HWMonitor and report ALL temperatures. HWMonitor has the advantage of showing current, minimum, and maximum temps so that you can tell us the peaks after an hour of use as well as the idle temps. Also, the peak temps for gaming would be much higher than for browsing and general office work.
Then tell us all of your system specs so we will know the significance of these numbers to you.
For example, if the temperature is for your CPU or northbridge and it is right after gaming, an elevated temperature of 50-60C might not be too bad, depending on your CPU/chipset. Do not assume that a temperature reading of one component on your motherboard is hot, that translates to your entire tower being hot, it probably is not. With all of the numbers, we can tell where the problem if, if it really is a problem, and if the problem can be solved with something as simple as replacing, upgrading, or adding a case fan, or something possibly more involved. Please list all components, all temps, and all fan speeds.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.

message edited by Fingers


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#14
August 22, 2013 at 20:09:17
CPU temperatures always run higher then the system temperature, which is the inside of the case.

Install and run HWMonitor in the tray. You can then monitor in real time. Get HWMonitor from the link below.

http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmo...

The second link below is to the specs for your PSU. The 50c refers to rated output at that temperature. That doesn't mean the PSU can't get any hotter. If you look at all the specs it mentions components rated at 105c.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...


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#15
August 24, 2013 at 19:02:24
OK, well then i might not be overheating. I figured that once my system does freeze it will automatically restart itself.
Here is what HWmoniter says:
These are while idling and not under any load
http://s1051.photobucket.com/user/b...

What do these mean?

Also, what can cause my PC to crash and automatically restart itself?
My pc will freeze from either long idling times or when i play games such as Borderlands 2 on Max settings.


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#16
August 24, 2013 at 20:37:36
Your temps are not hot and your fans appear to be working fine. Your power supply is quality and sufficient. assuming you have the latest driver installed for your video card, it may be time to look elsewhere.
You might want to remove and reseat your graphics card again to make sure that it is seated fully and also look to make sure that everything is still plugged in correctly (and fully) and not disturbed from when you installed the graphics card.
After that, I would recommend booting to a CD you prepare with Memtest on it to test your memory for errors that might be causing your problem.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#17
August 24, 2013 at 21:52:56
I used the Windows Memory Diagnostics tool, and it said my mem was good (no errors)
I re-installed my Graphics Card it is plugged in correctly.

I have limited it down to heat, i would run the computer normally and use Msi Afterburner to simulate the computer underload and it froze in under 10 seconds.
Then i ran the computer again, but this time i took off the side panels and place 1 huge fan right next to it to suck out all the air, this time it completed the Msi afterburner test several times and didn't crash for about 10 mins

I also looked at my chipset and my heat sink, and the thermal paste was almost not there, could this be the problem?

My GPU and CPU are only 1 inch away from each other, could my GPU be giving heat to my CPU and causing the crashes?


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#18
August 25, 2013 at 05:25:17
You are going about it the hard way. Just watch HWMonitor in real time. If the temperatures are spiking you will see that. Check the BIOS settings for a low shut down point.

Windows memory test is not a good indicator.

Run memtast86+ from a boot device. Run it overnight.

Before you bother with that, re-seat all the cables and cards. Snap each stick of RAM in and out 4 or 5 times to burnish the contacts.

Post your case model, if you know it. Do you have a top or bottom mounted power supply?


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#19
August 25, 2013 at 16:54:49
"I also looked at my chipset and my heat sink, and the thermal paste was almost not there, could this be the problem?"

If you were able to actually look at your thermal material then you removed the heat sinks and NOW, you will need to completely remove ALL of the thermal compound and replace it correctly with the correct amount of thermal compound. Please look here:
http://www.arcticsilver.com/intel_a...
The method for applying to your CPU/heat sink if listed, for your other heat sinks (chipset, etc.) use the 'middle dot' method they list for some of the older CPU's. NEVER apply too much, it will tend to become an insulator if you apply too much and/or squeeze out all over the place. Never spread the compound since you will get air bubbles which will have insulating properties.
NEVER reinstall a heat sink without removing the old compound and reapplying by the correct method.

Your posted temperatures you showed on the link, were not hot, so unless you have an updated link showing something different from before you removed your heat sinks, that was not your problem (but might be now).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#20
August 25, 2013 at 17:26:25
This is HWMonitor after about 12 hours of continues idling
http://s1051.photobucket.com/user/b...

Is the thermal compound that necessary?

How do i get memtest86+ and run/download it?

I have a top mounted PSU, but i dont know the case model: my CPU was a pre-built, and its manufacturer is ZT systems


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#21
August 26, 2013 at 05:56:39
The temps are not that high, but idle temps are only half of the picture.

Replacing thermal compound is essential once you break the seal between the two components.

http://www.memtest86.com/download.htm
Creating a bootable CD or flash drive from the download and then booting to it.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#22
August 26, 2013 at 15:53:36
I ran memtest, it said everything was normal

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#23
August 26, 2013 at 19:17:16
How many passes did you let it run?

I asked about the case because some cases with all these side and top fans that do nothing but create turbulence. Do you have fans as described?

The fact that when you used an external fan to blow into the case you experienced different results. Describe the case fan setup.

Below is a link to memtest86+. Google is your friend.

http://www.memtest.org/


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#24
August 26, 2013 at 21:26:56
OK, so i ran memtest, and it only got to about 7% completion.

then my computer restarted, as in black screen really fast and smooth restart.??
What does this mean?

i have 1 case fan, i have no idea what or who it is


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#25
August 27, 2013 at 04:58:52
Did you try snapping the RAM sticks in and out 4 or 5 times as suggested?

Are you running Memtest86 or 86+?

Are you running it from within Windows or from a bootable device?


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#26
August 27, 2013 at 05:43:44
Also, If you get a freeze or restart when running Memtest, it still could be memory related, removing memory and leaving only one stick of memory and retesting to see if it will complete, then switching the memory and even the memory slots may confirm this. For example, if it runs through completely with one stick but not the other, that would mean that the one stick is definitely bad. Note that when replacing memory in a modern system, replace them as pairs to maintain the dual channel performance.

In addition, if you can report the exact memory you have (from the label on the memory) and also the BIOS listings for the running memory (speed, voltage, and timings), we may be able to tel if your system is running them at the correct settings.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#27
August 27, 2013 at 14:37:22
I ran memtest68, it said i pass with no errors. it took 1hour and 4 mins to complete.

My memory is 4sticks DDR3 4GB 2RX8 each,
I dont know who makes it but i can describe their logo:
It is a capital M with a circle around it and the circle is at a angle.

This was also on the ram, but i don't know what it means
MT16JTF51264AZ-1G6M1
PC3-12800U-11-11-B!


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