Solved HP Photosmart C7280 All-in-One Printer ink system failure

Hewlett-packard Photosmart c7280 multifu...
May 20, 2014 at 06:10:31
Specs: windows 8
My photosmart printer has suffered an ink system failure. The error message reads: 0xc18ca0001
I have tried the troubleshooting advice from the HP support page but to no avail (fixed printer head). Because the printer is 2008 the HP tech department won't even look at it ('end of sales' or some such reason) so I was wondering if there is any place that would consider repairing it without it costing £100s or should I admit defeat and buy a new one?

See More: HP Photosmart C7280 All-in-One Printer ink system failure

Report •


#1
May 20, 2014 at 08:29:11
✔ Best Answer
These days one can buy a decent multi-function unit for not a lot... Depending on how much you actually use it - I wouldn't rush out and spend a fortune.. I have a Canon mp620r which is a few years old now. works fine (touches wooden head) and does al I ned. Hasn't got a sheet feeder for scanning - but I can live without that luxury (and I do a fair bit of scanning at times).

Is this for an office (heavy-ish) use or simply for home use. In 208 multifunction units weren't as "cheap" as now for a given spec. And you may find an HP or Canon (I'd opt to Canon) for a lot less than you paid in 2008. Also Brother have a reasonable range too - with a sheet feeder for scanning. Main cost overall is the ink... Canon are reasonable (I get mine on-line and a lot cheaper than the "big high street stores" and use only Canon product). HP somewhat similar I suspect; and likely Brother too. Avoid Epson as they are expensive to run (re' ink...) and have a poor reputation overall for reliability; and also allegedly say the ink has run out, and stop printing from that colour - when there's actually quite a bit left...


Report •

#2
May 20, 2014 at 08:42:48
Hi, and thank you. The printer would be for home office use. I just feel it is such a shame that nowadays it's a case of throw it out because it's cheaper to get new one rather than repair the old one. So much waste! Anyway, I suppose I'd better start looking around - I have been very happy with the HP so would probably stay similar. I did think I would expect to spend between £50 - £100 for a new one so will see what's out there.

Report •

#3
May 20, 2014 at 09:13:33
I agree re the throw away culture; I'm of the vintage that likes to maintain, repair and retain kit if possible...

Certainly you ought to find something that will do nicely for a reasonable sum. (HP will be fine - my chums in USA have HP kit that is similar to my Canon and they happy with it...)

PCWorld often have deals going (especially if you play the business account routine); and also via Amazon.co.uk one can find a decent deal - after first researching the product "elsewhere..."

Ebuyer.co.uk is another possible source...; possibly play.com too (I've dealt with them in the past and found them ok - but not for anything major); and I'm sure you're familiar with other similar sources...

I'm presuming you're in the UK as you referred to £££ rather than$$$ in your earlier posts... Whereabout are you?


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
May 20, 2014 at 09:20:07
Just dun a kwik google trawl and found this - amongst other assorted hits...

http://h30434.www3.hp.com/t5/Other-...

It may be of interest?

I used the search term/string:

HP (Hewlett-Packard): Photosmart C7200 C7280 print head assembly

and it coughed up a whole slew of "stuff"... Possibly if you do a similar trawl you may find a replacement head assembly for not much cash; and also a how to take it (the printer - or at least the head assembly) to pieces out there too... Likely there will be Youtube video somewhere - as they seem to be about for almost anything these days. A google trawl filtered for videos may help in that regard as well as a general google trawl?


Report •

#5
May 20, 2014 at 10:06:23
Hampshire. And have just chosen a Canon Pixma! lol

Report •

#6
May 20, 2014 at 10:18:17
walmcin

I suggest you check for some reviews on the Canon Pixma. Depending on model the ink may be expensive relative to other printers.


Report •

#7
May 20, 2014 at 10:34:24
As for the old printer,
HP has a recycle program, here's a link

http://www8.hp.com/uk/en/hp-informa...

as do Staples (not sure you have those in the UK),
so you don't have to chuck it into a land fill.

MIKE

http://www.skeptic.com/


Report •

#8
May 20, 2014 at 10:49:25
I have done nothing but check thru various printer comparisons! My eyes are failing me now.....
When I have to buy refills I will look into the compatible ink options.

Report •

#9
May 20, 2014 at 10:52:53
Very good news. Thank you. I have just tried to follow a youtube video on dismantling the thing but my attempts to follow the not-very-clear instructions weren't working. And then another site that showed how to got the system maintenance menu. Got a bit excited when I could print a page out but then the whole error thing came back again! All very interesting and educational anyway.

Report •

#10
May 20, 2014 at 11:12:32
I've generally found Canon printers good. With the new printer are you now getting exactly the same error message and symptoms as given in your original post?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

#11
May 20, 2014 at 13:17:28
No, the new printer has only just been ordered and should arrive within 3-10 days. It was the old printer I tried again to 'fix' but not. Lordy, I hope the new one doesn't show any error messages for at least 5-10 years. Optimistic, that's me. ;-)

Report •

#12
May 20, 2014 at 13:29:14
Yeah, I hope so too. These threads stay open for months so let us know if you
new printer works OK - I think it will.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#13
May 20, 2014 at 15:21:45
I used to buy my Canon (genuine branded) refills from http://www.oyyy.co.uk/

but they have now "merged" with another "larger"? outfit; see details at the above link.

Their prices were OK compared to the big high street stores etc. However I recently found that a trawl around Amazon/co.uk would bring up even better prices...; and I now go there - until i find even better prices elsewhere.

Haven't ever used copycat/substitute refills, nor refilled my own cartridges. Generally don't wish to go down the path of a possible screwed up or whatever set of print heads... And often the price for "allegedly decent" substitutes isn't too far from some of the best deals for the genuine article.

edited to correct spelkink mystakes...

message edited by trvlr


Report •

#14
May 20, 2014 at 15:45:09
trvlr

I agree. I've found that using the manufacturers' cartridges ensure photos have minimal fade in sunlight too.

As for ink blocking, I can leave my ancient iP4000 Canon printer for months without any issue when I then ask it to print. It then does a rather long clean, which uses ink of-course, but if that's what it takes then I wouldn't argue. It still produces first class results (better than I've seen with some modern printers). I don't do so much printing these days so running costs are less important.

If you are not worried about fade, quality and ink clogging then maybe substitutes have their place - but I'm no longer prepared to use them.

Years ago I messed with manual refilling, got covered with ink and produced rubbish prints - never again.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


Report •

#15
May 21, 2014 at 11:10:51
Ok, I will try not to go down the route of substitute inks if I can find the real thing for a decent price. Manual refills sounds like a disaster waiting to happen - there's a potential for spillage, I will spill it!

Report •

#16
May 21, 2014 at 14:15:15
And with some cartridges - depends on the make etc. (and not sure if it applies to any/all Canon) there is also a chip reset (within the cartridge) to attend to. There are websites that discuss and tell how to do it; but for my part I don't think it's worth the pain etc...

Report •

#17
May 21, 2014 at 15:28:10
The problem with generic ink is that the particle size must be larger than the OEM ink. This causes blockage of the print head.

Even the OEM stuff will do that if the ink tanks are past the use date.

I have older Canon BJC printers and the ink is really expensive now so I am trying generic.

Is the print head easily removed on the new Canon you ordered?


Report •

#18
May 21, 2014 at 15:51:07
Not sure if this is still the norm but my old Canon printer has the print heads built into the cartridges. This means new cartridges = new print heads (disposable), which is probably why it has proved so reliable. Cartridges for old printers are expensive but at present I regard it as worth it.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


Report •

#19
May 21, 2014 at 15:59:10
There are some colour laser about now that aren't too expensive overall; and can compare favourably against inkjet - in terms of cost per page. Although lasers are often more expensive to buy initially (even at the bottom end) than a typical inkjet, they are OK for general colour use; but not (unless one goes really up market price-wise) as good as inkjet for photo work.

Brother have a couple of multi-functions units (inkjet) that almost match laser toner prices/page...; and allegedly almost inkjet quality for photos.. Though I'm not totally sold on that latter aspect, from my own brief look-see...

Overall I still use an elderly Epson black toner laser printer (circa 1995...) for general use; and my Canon Pixma (colour) inkjet only when I "need" colour documents; and of course photo work. All too easy to get sucked into everything must be in full colour and thus into inkjets etc., when a black toner laser copy will do fine in many situations.


Report •


Ask Question